New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

chocolate thermometer???

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
When tempering chocolate do I really NEED a "chocolate" thermometer? Or can I just use my instant read thermometers?
post #2 of 13
Instant read themometes aren't all that accurate, and you need accuarcy for tempering chocolate. If you're out by 2 or 3 degrees, you'll be wishing you had used a choc. thermometrer.

But you don't need a "special" thermometer. Body temp. is just about the right temp for tempering, right? So you trot off to the drugstore and get one of those $3.00 digital thermometers and you're all set.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 13
Like that idea Foodpump, hmmmmmmmm.

Rgds Rook
post #4 of 13
Ideally, iggygirl, you'll temper without the aid of a thermometer. It's not hard or mysterious at all and you're better able to cope with variables. Use the thermometer once or twice so you know what you're looking for and then chuck it.

Besides, even if you don't temper very often what do you do when the thermometer breaks (because they inevitably do if they're not already lost, stolen or borrowed)? You can't tell your chef or your client that they can't have the product, so you'll end up tempering by eye/feel anyway.
post #5 of 13
I would suggest also to use a thermometer for a while and then you will either learn to temper by touch or sight...but without starting with a thermometer you can't know what temp you are looking at or touching...(by the way....right under your bottom lip is the most sensitive spot to heat on the body....chocolatiers will get the chocolate on their finger and touch it to that spot to tell the temp).....

-Robert
chocolateguild
post #6 of 13
Even after tempering and after using a thermometer you should still run some new tempered chocolate onto the bench to check it sets before using it for production.;)
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
post #7 of 13

Agree.....

yup,... I agree with felix the dog that what ever you used for tempering (thermometer, felling, instinct, etc) you should chek it first especially for enrobes, decoration, moulding.
post #8 of 13

temper temper temper

there are many ways to temper, even as an old dog I learn new tricks.
Use a thermometer, get a feel for chocolate, remember that no two batches are alike or two brands are alike. The look, the temperature, the viscosity....all need to be considered.
Once you know how to temper, its always good to check your work!:bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #9 of 13
BTW, I don't actually have a "chocolate thermometer" I use a standard lollypop thermometer which is regularly callibrated. It gets bulldog clipped to the bain insert. Work fine:) .
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
post #10 of 13

tempering

Aguynamedrobert is right. Put a drop of chocolate just below your lower lip with your finger and it should feel slightly cool. If it feels warm, the chocolate is too hot, if it feels cold, the chocolate is too cold. I use digital thermometers, but always do the "chin check".
post #11 of 13
I use a test strip: tear of a small piece of parchment paper and dip one side in the chocolate and let it set. When it sets (if it sets) note how long it took, how the chocolate looks (shiny or not, streaky or not), check out the "snap" when you break it. The "chin check" is not something I can personally advocate, but really whatever works for you works!
post #12 of 13
Well the bottom lip test is to test temperature...not if it's tempered...it can be a great tool...but I would suggest using a piece of parchement like mentioned or a spoon or just put a thin strip on your marble(if you have it)...just make sure you test it before you use it...then you know it is tempered before you use it...all these recomendations are great ones!

Merry Christmas,
Robert
www.chocolateguild.com
post #13 of 13

thermometer

I always use an infrared thermometer. Even though I can usually tell byfeel and look. I use the same thermometer every time and using it can "keep me posted" on how close I am. My job is usually very hectic so I have to do alot of multi-tasking. So I use the seeding method. I set the chocolate bowl on my work station and every 30 seconds to a minute or so I stir well and get a temp. This way I can guage about how much time I have. When it gets close to temp. I stop what Im doing and stir pretty much constantly. When it looks right I do a test on a small metal spatula.

We often dip cookies and coconut maccaroons in dark and milk chocolate. We keep plastic containers with choc. specifically for this. What I do when I need to dip cookies is pop the container in the micro for a minute or so (depending on how much chocolate there is) It will be completely melted in one or two spots. I stir well making a soupy mixture full of large lumps. I stir it continuously for just a very few minutes until it starts to look "right" then I test on a spatula to see if it is in temper. The whole process usually takes less than 10 minutes (including the test). No thermometer needed. Works like a charm. But it wont work for work that requires no lumps.

Eeyore
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Pastry Chefs