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If you do pulled sugar read this!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Found this article while surfing thought it was rather interesting:

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi...ournalCode=bjd

Rgds Rook
post #2 of 14
Hmmmm,

I really think there was an agenda for this article.
I understand the perspiration, I also encounter that. As we all know you cannot work with isomalt without gloves. The moisture from the hands has a horrible effect on the finished product.
I tried the cream with no reduction in perspiring. I found that cotton gloves under the gloves works best with the hotter sugar. I did develope an allergy to latex while working with sugar.
I'm not so sure that these may not be allergies from raw products. I know plenty of pastry chefs who cannot come in contact with raw material. Certain sugars, flours, yeasts, grains, etc.
pan
I say agenda because the participants must have been given the cream or told to use it. No?
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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
That was kind of my assumption too but I wanted to see if anyone else read into it what I did. I know I do not have an aversion for latex I can wear it all day have to in my current job. I just wonder how hard it would be to be a chef and have a allergy to things like nuts and such as to be frustrating for the chef especially. I guess food borne allergies are just something you have to deal with.

Rgds Rook
post #4 of 14
I'm not sure I see much of a point in that. They studied 50 people out of how many thousands of people world wide that work with sugar. Out of those 50 only 30 responded and out of those 30, 26 reported no problems :confused: so 4 people sweated too much and the rest of them their hands got hot and red. This is scientific?!?:crazy: Ehh anyway it does sound like a thinly and poorly veiled attempt to push a potential product.

From my experience I have seen that there are those whose palms sweat and those who don't. Ewald was one who didn't and he always worked without gloves and his hands were dry as a bone. Mine were somewhat in the middle. I found that if I was blowing and shaping items that keeping my hands near the fan helped keep them dry. I was also able to feel the product better without them. But my hands didn't have enough expereince to be able to go too long without gloves.
Oddly though when I saw Ewald recently on tv, he was wearing gloves. I did wonder why about that.
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Interesting observation Ch. I guess I did not see the point in it either but wanted to get some other views on it.

Rgds Rook
post #6 of 14

Something I learned many decades ago ...

Sugar is an irritant. People working in sugar processing mills (or plants or whatever they call them) had a high level of skin problems of the hands and lungs from inhaling the dust.

My mom was sort of a Ralph Nader type 50 years ago. (vitamins, holistic/alternative medicine and herbal remedies, etc) Seems that everything that people thought she was a kook for complaining about is now widely touted as true.

I'm certain working conditions are vastly improved now but it would seem that the same irritant effect of sugar wouldn't change.

April
post #7 of 14
Interesting point. I wonder though that inhaling is different in the fact that sugar though water soluable is still crystalline in nature and inhaling it in larger quantities would be akin to inhaling thousands of tiny little knives. Anyone who works in any sort of factory that produces dust, especially ones of mineral like qualities would have problems. I'm not sure I see the relate though to that and pulled sugar which is a "liquid" form and therefore would not have the sharp edges as it would in the factory. I am not disagreeing with you April, as I said you have an interesting point on it. I just question the relationship between the two in this particular case.
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #8 of 14
I did an apprenticeship 75 yrs. ago with a master baker who used to make me hand rub the bread,clear, and rye flour. I rubbed sometimes till raw. I caloused and rubbed till crack etc.
I can't even get close to the stuff today. I think if you abuse any part of your body, internally or externally you reduce the tolerance for the product your abusing.
I'm of the impression that you must always use gloves with isomalt because it's more sensitive to moisture then sugar. Anyone know?
pan
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post #9 of 14
Er... yes. It's called sampling and it underpins just about all research in the physical and social sciences.

You're actually not interpreting the abstract (summary) correctly: it does not state that 26 reported no problems, it states that 26 did not have a chronic (i.e. long-term) skin disorder. In fact, as the abstract states very clearly, two-thirds of the respondents reported some skin problems - including sweating, erythema (inflammation) and blistering - when doing hot sugar work.

In this article, two doctors are trying to find a solution to painful skin problems that thousands of hot sugar workers experience; they think they've identified a preparation (cheap, and already available from pharmacists as a remedy for excessive bodily perspiration) that helps in some cases; they've tested it on a sample of participants; and have published their research in one of the world's most prestigious medical journals.

What's the problem?

Personally speaking, I think any research that concentrates on the occupational health of kitchen workers should be encouraged and supported. I'm not clear why some of the responses to this thread are couched in such negative terms.

It did make me remember, though, the children's writer Alison Uttley's description of a woman making pulled sugar sweets at a fair in England in the late 19th century: hanging the mass of melted sugar from a hook and greasing her hands thoroughly with spit before beginning to pull the sugar!
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Pan I have worked Isomalt without gloves and it did not seem to effect it. But then agian isomalt is more tolerant to hygroscopidty than regular granulated. I believe long term exposure to anything given enough time in that enviroment can have an effect on human health to an extent. Now thats not saying that its all detrimental to human health just that some effects are worse than others.

Rgds Rook
post #11 of 14
We have to understand that I am really hot blooded. but when I simplied touched a piece of blown isomalt, it lost it's luster right away. Even left fingerprints.
When I spent time with Ewald a few months ago, I had forgot by non latex gloves and was using my hands. He said it was a must to use gloves, but I'm not sure exactly what the meaning was. That type of thing could stem from something like his liability ins.
With regular sugar back in the Chrose age, you could actually get a little luster by rubbing a piece in your palms.
pan
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post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Pan you speak of Ch as if he toiled in the Ancient days of sugar art. Ch you weren't around during the days of Ancient Egypt were you? Actually Pan I used one of the granulated sugar recipes from well you know where and it worked rather well. I was a little skeptical of the sugar to water ratio at first but it did well. My man Ewald knows his stuff don't he?

Rgds Rook
post #13 of 14
yea, do a little testing with your fingers to see what you come up with.
BTW I was not referring to Egyptian time, just right after the FlintStones:lol:
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post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOuch!

Rgds Rook
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