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Steak drama

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone.

Hope you guys can help... theres so many forums and its hard to search the topic I need on a search engine. Anyhow im in steak drama. I don't know really anything about meats. Except that I like them medium rare, and I love baby back ribs haha.

So my question is, im looking for the perfect steak that can be used in a cheesesteak sub. A steak that can be cut finely, and "shreded" by my spatulas when cooking it. I was told rib eye would be the best, or top round sirloin. I was able to come up with this on my research, I believe its the order of meats in best to... not best.

Filet Mignon
Boneless Strip Steak/New York Steak
Ribeye Steak
T-Bone/Porterhouse
Top Sirloin
Skirt Steak

Hope you all can help. Thanks!
post #2 of 17
It appears to me that using any of the more expensive cuts of beef is an incredible waste of money when you're using it to make a cheesesteak. Especially a less flavourful cut like the tenderloin.

If you slice less tender cuts that have some fat across the grain and very thinly, they should cook up quite well and be very flavourful (note Korean-style beef short ribs/kalbi, sliced thinly, marinated and grilled).

Top round sirloin sounds like a cut that is less costly on the wallet and should do well under these cooking conditions, though I may want to try one with a bit more fat streaked across it. Rib-eye also sounds like a good idea, if somewhat more expensive.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Yes it is usually sirloin or ribeye, I think ribeye might be the better one because its a little fattier/juicier if im correct?
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Would anyone recommend a marinade or spices to add to the ribeye?

Perhaps, butter, garlic, salt/pepper.... not sure what else.
post #5 of 17
Dare I ask what in Gods name is Cheesesteak ??

You Americans and your obession putting cheese in the strangest places:crazy:
post #6 of 17
I like using a cheap steak like sirloin or rib-eye. Sometimes I use beef tenderloin if I have it lying around the house but you don't have to go crazy with expensive cuts. One time I heard of a 100 dollar cheesesteak. Barclay Prime's cheesesteak is made of sliced Kobe beef, melted Taleggio cheese, shaved truffles, sauteed foie gras, caramelized onions and heirloom shaved tomatoes on a homemade brioche roll brushed with truffle butter and squirted with homemade mustard. You don't need to go all out unless you're filthy stinking rich. :chef: I would eat those expensive cuts whole- they taste better that way. I used to add really expensive cuts to things like burgers and sandwiches, but then I learned that cheap cuts work best. Escpecially since I'm saving up for that tanning bed- just kidding. :D
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Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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post #7 of 17

The wonder that is cheesesteak (also known as a Philly Cheesesteak)

Oh, it's a glorious and humble sandwich consisting of a long, soft bun, thinly sliced beef cooked on a griddle/flat top and cheese. The most traditional of the sandwiches are served just with sauteed diced onion and either provolone or cheez whiz (yes, there is a certain charm to cheez whiz served on CERTAIN things). I personally also like some sauteed peppers and mushrooms on it, though I'd prefer the provolone.

I understand the rationale behind the expensive version (like the burger), but there's something just so appealing about the humble, no pretentions version of it (I had a lot of them during my college days).
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #8 of 17
I agree with blueicus. Except sometimes I really like to grill my meat instead of saute and sear. Escpecially in the summertime when its the perfect time to grill.
Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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post #9 of 17
I am vegetarian, so meat is not something I know. I once had a Mexican boyfriend, however, and he loved carne asada. He would get very thin cuts of meat from the local Mexican butcher (carnicerĂ­a). The meat was not expensive at all and he used to shred it with a spatula as you have described. I suggest a visit to a carnicerĂ­a and as the butcher there what the cut he uses for carne asada is. My 2c. :)
post #10 of 17
Ok, let's all be on the same page. The cut of meat is chilled almost frozen or not and then sliced very thin. Not sliced after the meat is prepared.
Most joints will use a top. Grill has to be pretty hot as not to draw water out and end up steaming the meat.
what I know
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #11 of 17
Exactly, then if you want you can chop up the shavings with your spatula as they cook. By the way, isn't it at this point that someone from Philly will say "don't even bother unless you get your bread from Philly".

Tony
post #12 of 17
I just watched an episode of Throwdown with Bobby Flay a few weeks ago where he went up against the guy who is considered to make the best cheese steak in Philly. I believe Flay lost the challenge. The guy he challenged used thin sliced rib-eye and a Cheese Whiz sauce. I don't think they even had onions on it as they usually don't. They also don't shred the meat with the spat, they just cook the slices very briefly on high heat.
post #13 of 17

Oh, heck...our favorites...

Get a nice inexpensive top sirloin roast. A major food chain here has them frequently for maybe 2.77 per lb.

The trick that I use for tender meat is this: I poke it. The squishier it is the more tender. Dumb, huh?

Slice thinly then place strips of meat between two strong pieces of parchment or plastic wrap and bash the dickens out of it with your flat basher of choice. (Not the nibby part of a meat tenderizer)

When it's paper thin, season, slap it in a hot oiled pan, and flip with a spatula after a couple of seconds. Then slice any way you like.

In Guatemala they prepare steak and chicken this way, seasoned simply with chili powder and salt.

Of course it's not Philly. For that I'd just use S&P, a processed swiss cheese, onion and bell peppers. No spices.

April
:beer:
post #14 of 17
An article you all might be interested regarding the origin of the cheesesteak:

The Philadelphia Cheesesteak Experience
post #15 of 17
'Bug-
That was a nice read.

Thanks,

Mike :bounce:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #16 of 17
That's only because we don't have Vegemite. ;)
post #17 of 17
Indeed. Thanks!

We've got a cheesesteak place near me (way downtown NYC), and maybe it's the way they do it, but it's not for me. Don't get me wrong, I am definitely NOT a food snob, but it's just eh. Maybe if they seasoned all the components better? This is one of the better uses of "process cheese sauce" ;) but only if everything works together. I'm sure I used to see "cheesesteak steak" in the freezer case at the supermarket; maybe I should try my own.
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