or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Good shoes for the home cook?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Good shoes for the home cook?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
My kids and I have to eat gluten-free, so I have to make all my convenience foods from scratch. For example, if my kids want chicken nuggets, I first have to bake the bread so I can grind it down for breadcrumbs. I spend a lot of time in the kitchen by suburban housewife standards, but not anything near what anyone here does. I enjoy cooking but it's been really hard on my back and feet. I have tile floors and just regular sneakers.

I'm wondering if anyone has a recommendation on either a good supportive brand of sneakers, or a relatively inexpensive professional shoe.

Thanks,

Nancy
Loving my gluten-free life.
Reply
Loving my gluten-free life.
Reply
post #2 of 13
Good question there Nantzie , I often cook in bear feet and then regret it later. From a totally unprofessional enthusiast point of view , I like to cook in a good light weight pair of running shoes (puma atm) . Lots of shock absorbtion and very comfortable. I am sure the local "Foot locker" has plenty to choose from . Buy a supersceded model that is marked down. Look for soft and light.

Anything designed for long distance running must also work for standing in a home kitchen I would think. Where you don't have the safety/durability issues of a commercial kitchen.
post #3 of 13
Nancy,
Purchasing a couple of anti-fatigue mats are certainly in order especially where you do most of your standing/prep. I don't allow tennies in the kitchen, not only are most not slip resistant but there is just not the support you need for standing.
I don't encourage professional shoes at home because they seem to take to long to break in. I always make an annual trip to a good shoe store and inquire what the surgeons are wearing. In my neck of the woods they are still wearing a pro style Rockport which is what I wear in my home kitchen.
I hope more persons will pop on for this is a GREAT question.
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #4 of 13
FWIW I still love my Doc Marten's in a style I believe is known as "70's-punk-red." Lace up those bad boys and you could stand at attention for a week.

That said, I think I might have to vote for some of the 3/4 top trainers with leather uppers. Good ankle support plus a leather body for a little safety.

And coming from someone with back and shoulder problems- STRETCH BEFORE YOU COOK. You don't have to be running a marathon or pumping iron for stretching to do you some good; just limber up with 10 minutes of back and shoulder stretching before taking on the exercise of the kitchen. May sound silly, but I swear it isn't.
post #5 of 13
I have seen the ads for the anti-fatigue, gel mats- anyone personally familiar with them? I often end up on my feet processing game meats in my kitchen, I have really comfy pair of Lacoste shoes that I love, but last time I had 2 wild pigs to cut, I ended folding up a towel an standing on it (I have very textured tile on my kitchen floor that is murder on my feet, but a remodel isn't happening now)- it was 6 hours standing in one place, so I can sympathize. One of those mats might be the answer (I think they run about $70)
Bon Vive' !
Reply
Bon Vive' !
Reply
post #6 of 13

Croc's Definitely

On many yachts most crew don't wear shoes inside. That being said the floor surfaces are either wood (and it seems like extra-hard wood) or marble. This does a real doosie on the back and feet and legs....etc. Some boats I worked on allowed inside shoes for chefs. I have always worn crocs. You can get them online or if you live in a big city they might have a store. Don't buy the generic ones though, they're not as good.
post #7 of 13

Oops...I forgot...

And the crocs only cost about twenty bucks
post #8 of 13
I swear by my Crocs, which I wear **** near anytime I'm wearing any sort of shoes.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I really appreciate it. I might start off with the anti-fatigue mats. Where would I get them?

But I have to say to bludogz I just absolutely LOVE the idea of the red Doc's. I never had Doc's myself, but now that you mention it I do remember friends saying how comfortable they were.

Gotta stir up the suburban housewife crowd somehow...

:cool:

Nancy
Loving my gluten-free life.
Reply
Loving my gluten-free life.
Reply
post #10 of 13
I wore docs when working in a professional kitchen and I have to say they killed me b/c they are so flat. But it might also just be my feet or the shape of my spine, who knows, its different for everyone. I do love clogs, because the weight of your body is taken off the heels, my feet haven't hurt in over 5 years. I've never had knee or back problems either, and this is me standing for 50 hours per week, not to mention the walking arond everywhere in NYC. Lots of my co-workers love birkenstocks, or even just cushy orthopedic type shoes. I know shoes like these can get really expensive, but I figure its a lot more expensive to get back or knee surgery. I never go cheap when it comes to kitchen shoes...
post #11 of 13
I didn't like Doc Marten's in the kitchen. My favorite all time shoes are Danskos. Danskos all the way. Wear them in and out of the kitchen.
post #12 of 13

good shoes for the home cook

Well I always waer clogs I have had the same two for 5 years and around $60 for one not bad starting to wear out now.When on your feet a lot you need a heal. If standing in one place a olot you need wooded ones.
post #13 of 13
Docs, hands down. They make a pair of retro tennis shoe-like shoes that are very, very good for cooking. All leather is good, the sole resists grease and oil, and it's full of air to boot (no pun intended). I've worn Docs for almost 10 years now.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Good shoes for the home cook?