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Foam sauce

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi,


i had read countless recipes that includes both milk n cream in a foam sauce and to blend it a high speed.

I would like to know is it the cream or milk that whips up the foam in a foamy sauce? Is the foam more stable wen hot or cold?
Cook not because we have to, but because we like to!!"
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Cook not because we have to, but because we like to!!"
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post #2 of 9
If you aerate any liquid you will get bubbles. The question is: how long will the bubble hold?? But I think fat keeps a stronger bubble, like soap.
(that's my theory anyway....) People also add gelatin to liquids to make bubbles last longer as well.

In regards to temperature, I don't know....
post #3 of 9

foam sauce

Known as Culinary foam created by the affable chef Ferran Aeral. Anyone know precisely how to do it and the recipe?
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #4 of 9

Foam sauce

Cream is the chemical party of hold the foam, you wont get that from milk. You can also mount your sauce with butter just before using the immersion blender to emulsify and spoon foam from top to make your "Air" garnish.
post #5 of 9
If you have an express machine maker, using the steamer , you can get a really good micro-foam (like a cappucino).
Sometimes I use 10% cream as well.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 9
When it comes to doing this, you'll get a better foam from the lower fat milks as the heat allows for more air as it doesn't heat as quick. If you use cream or high fat milks, they have a tendency to boil before they foam. As one who makes cappuccino every morning, I can attest to the better foam from non-fat milk...

I'd go the immersion blender route as suggested. I think you'll get the result you're after.
post #7 of 9
Ferran Adrià uses gelatin to make his foams in the following siphon.

You typically mix creme fraiche (35% fat), gelatin sheets and your puree, then place in the siphon with the gas cartridges.
post #8 of 9
I have tried every milk you can think of, and it all works for me. I have used and tried just about everything and like you , I use my machine 5 -8 everyday, and no matter what I use , I always get a great froth. I have at home, a Pasquini Livia 90 and I cannot see my life without it.

Sì, il latte è l'unico modo andare.

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 9
If you want to get away from dairy, use soy lethicin. A small amount in a liquid will suffice. Pour your "sauce" base into a container with relatively large surface area and add your lethicin. Aerate the mixture with a stick blender by skimming it across the top of the liquid, bubbles will start to form at the top. When you are satisfied with the texture you can spoon the foam off of the top. It will be quite stable for some time. In my experience this aeration will change the flavour profile, making it somewhat sweeter and "fattier" in mouth feel than your original sauce. Keep that in mind when seasoning.

--Al
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