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Crepe Maker Recommendation - Page 2

post #31 of 49

2 good 8 or 10 inch frying pans.  No electric needed 2 portable butane burners.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #32 of 49

Chefedb forgot to mention the needed " knowhow " to go along with the frying pansredface.gif

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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post #33 of 49

If one can't learn to make a crepe after  10 minutes, of practice  then something is wrong.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #34 of 49

Interesting thread.

 

Evidently I am one of the few people in the Western Hemisphere who is not planning to open a crepe stand. wink.gif

 

I'm going to check in on this thread from time to time to see how all you aspiring entrepreneurs are making out. I hope you all will keep us up to date.  I've started a couple businesses in my time (one still operating after 30 years, now tended by my son) so I have a deep appreciation for your hopes. I wish you all  the greatest success.

 

Ummm... on the other hand, if you ALL make it big, we may well find ourselves up to our a**** in crepes! rolleyes.gif

 

Mike  

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #35 of 49

Hi,

 

I am trying to calculate the cost of running a crepe stand at my farmer market, I really appreciate if someone can share how much propane can I expect to spend on a weekend (9 hours total) for one griddle. 

Thanks a lot for your help

post #36 of 49
Hi Dean,

I'm in the early stages of starting a crepe van/trailer. I have read a lot of your tips and comments to others. Do you have a book that gives further advice on starting up, and if so what's the process of getting a copy?

Regards, Chris
post #37 of 49

Hi ,

I am also in the initial stages of looking at equipment to get a crepe operation going. Did anyone get a guide on how to start it up? I see many posts about it. Please let me know. Also,is everyone else using a commercial kitchen to prepare the batter. Any advise on that?

Milena

post #38 of 49

Just was wondering how your business is going.  Was interested in starting a crepe business....any advise? 

Would love any help or advise you can give.   Did you go to a cooking school to get your experience making crepes? 

Look forward to hearing from you.

Ellen

post #39 of 49

hi my name is Raul figueroa I have a lot experience making crepes with different types of batter( whole wheat, buckwheat, chickpea flour, rice flour, glutten free and vegan), to make the batter you can use Hobart mixer, immersion blender or whisk,

post #40 of 49

Does anyone know of a cooking school for crepes?   Does anyone have a crepe truck doing business?  If so would love to talk with you. 559.269.8900  Ellen

post #41 of 49

See?!!  I was right- everybody but me is fixing to get into the crepe business.

 

Look at this and... eat your hearts out!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJ5BU225P3A

 

Mike  :D

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #42 of 49

RAMPANT HEDONISM...  :bounce:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eL0TMHjwHE

 

This has got to stop!

 

Mike

 

She is having WAY too much fun!

 

On the other hand, if there's a lot of this going around, you guys may be on to something...

 

And, that's some pretty impressive wrist action there by the crepeista (or whatever the  term for the professional is.)

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #43 of 49

How do you do to clean your hands if the crepe cart doesn't have a sink?

post #44 of 49

Moist Towelettes?

post #45 of 49

Your local health department will have the answer---I believe a sink is mandatory in this area---

post #46 of 49
[BHello Everyone[/B]
I need tips on making crepes using an electric crepe maker. I would eventually get a propane one, im in the early stages of adding crepes to my menu. I can not make a perfectly round one. I been practicing. I have used the tool that came with the crepe maker as well as a wooden one, however they keep ripping in the middle. I would greatly appreciate any tips on how to keep this from happening.
Thank YOU in advance!
post #47 of 49

we run a cart and opened a tiny crêpe cafe 6 days a week so i don't get here too often 

 

If they rip in the middle then you may be  

    1) dragging the crêpe trowel

    2) going too slow so the batter starts cooking on the inner end of the trower

    3) not holding the trowel level so that end digs into the crêpe

    4 letting the trowel drag - you may need to hold it up and glide along the top of the batter

 

As we often tell our customers, the first 1,000 are the hardest :)

 

Richard

post #48 of 49

I would NOT use an electric crepe maker. People do not expect to see a cheap little electric gadget that they can buy for 20 bucks. Part of eating a crepe is the experience of watching it being made or knowing that it took a little care and creativity if you're just sitting at your table gazing into your loved ones eyes.

Someone mentioned one burner. This is unworkable. People will not will not wait in line that long. Having multiple pans going is more cost efficient and makes for a better "show". Even a halfway decent cook can have two going simultaneously.

 I would have at least two probably five GOOD pans. Of course TONS spatulas, trowels and offset spatulas. Several GOOD balloon wisks. You will need a lot to avoid cross contamination and because of accidental drops. In the olden days, they would need to be "red handled" but modern days I think most cities now allow silicone. Refrigeration/ice chests. Several instant read thermometers and ONE infrared non-contact thermometer. Several Sani-buckets, towels and the associated chemicals and test strips. If you're selling at a street fair, I'd buy an anti-fatigue mat that you can hose down. Gloves. Shade and seating if outdoors. Trash recepticles. Napkins and utensils for the customers. Signage.

(A Hobart/kitchen aid for home) All your sanitation materials. Wet nap/ moist towelettess are NOT permissible in most cities. I cannot believe anyone said that! Neither is sqirt bottles of purel. Even if you go to an open market/art fair/street fair, the health department WILL visit. I have done chef demonstrations at fairs and the health department always shows up.

I'd also try add on sales of coffee/hot chocolate/tea/chai at the very least. Probably some croissant, cro-nuts, muffins or rice crispy treats, cookies also at a minimum.

I think you might have some issues with butane/propane in terms of liability and in terms of local fire ordinances. Butane will also be pretty expensive. IF I went gas, I'd convert to propane
Personally I'd go electric induction with 3-4 Max burton NSF RATED 1800 watt burners. This is enough to get the job done, pass rental agreement, local ordinances, pass insurance company and possible liability issues. Do NOT buy those cheap infomercial induction stoves. It's only just a very few dollars more to get a max burton and you'll have much higher wattage, reliability and durability. The infomercial ones are only 1300 watts.
Thos would allow you to have 2 burners for the crepes. One to keep water tat temp for sanitation if you do not have plumbing. And one in case of breakdowns. Add one more if you want water for tea/chai/French press coffee.

Someone mentioned using a Hobart/kitchen aid. That might work for the "big batch" which would be broken down into workable sizes for food safety purposes (kept at proper temp) and because hand wisking is part of the show. It would be completely crazy to try to mix enough for one day with an immersion blender.

You do not need to go to culinary school to make crepes. But education doesn't hurt in preparing your business plan. In learning sourcing, buying strategies, and food safety and in learning profitability, business growth. And your business lan will be much cheaper if you have gone to school. Liability insurance will be less if you've gone to school.
I do not own a crepe making business and have no intention of owning one, but wish you the best of luck!


Edited by harrisonh - 8/18/14 at 11:32pm
post #49 of 49
My wife and I are looking to start a crepe business on a very small scale such as at craft shows or up in Ann Arbor michigan during football season and only on weekends. We are both teachers and would like some advice. Do you find krampouz the best in terms of relaibility or are there equivalents out there that are not as expensive. In addition over in France the Bretagne region, they use electric and not gas- why one would be better than the other. We don't want to over do it but keep it simple. Other question is there a great recipe for gallettes because we have some difficulty mimicking how they are made in France.
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