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Proper Beer for Chili

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hey all ;)

I have been playing around for months now with my chili recipe (turkey chili) and trying to find a beer that would go well in it. I cannot find anything that seems to leave a flavor behind :(

Can anyone recommend a beer that would go well in turkey chili and leave a bit of that "beer" taste behind?

Thank you in advance
Kam
post #2 of 21
Try something a little darker, with a bit more maltiness to it. I think Negro Modelo, from Mexico, makes a good addition to chili, though there are many others out there also.
post #3 of 21
Have you tried a Belgian beer? Do you have access to them where you are (Sam's Club carries them i know). The best is a trappist beer made by monks, like Chimay, but you could even try Leffe which should be widely available.
post #4 of 21
Guiness or Bass has always worked well for me. Just depends on the depth of flavor and what ratio of spices you're using for the particular style. A good merlot or cabernet is a unique flavor for chili also.:D


Chameleon, unfortunately I can't agree with you on that (not that it really matters hehehe) It's way to difficult to find some of those ales here, especially the Latrappes/Konegshoven (sp?), Korsendunks, etc and in good supply so... Atleast when I do get them they get shelved for aging and drunk for enjoyment.:beer: :beer: :)
post #5 of 21
I use Negro Modelo or Guinness, whichever I can get.
post #6 of 21
We've been known to make a little chili around here.
Darks from Mexico are used but the overall beer used in chili around here is Shiner Bock. For chili, you need to buy it warm and add it warm.
I've heard there are some people who put beans in their chili:eek: Steep some episoto in the bock before adding. and, never salt beans untill fully cooked:beer: :bounce: :look:
actually this is for barracho beans also.
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post #7 of 21
I don't know that I would use a Belgian, just like I wouldn't use a Grand Cru Bourdeaux for cooking. Belgians are great beers, but a lot of their wonderful, subtle flavors will be lost in the cooking proccess. Though you don't want to use crap beer or wine in cooking, I feel it is not neccessary to use the "top shelf" stuff either.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thank you!! That gives me some other options as well!! I have been using dark Irish ales the past few times, but I think it's time to move on and try some listed!

Thanks for the info!!
post #9 of 21
I'm thinking Chameleon suggested those beers because she is in Belgium.
Here in the US I think those are good choices to drink while the chili is cooking:beer: :beer:
The chefs around here clock there chili's and smokes by beer.
6 pak chili --yuck! spices still pretty raw
12 pak---better

The ultimate is a two case smoke:bounce: :beer:
The hardest thing about a 2 case smoke is remembering the ribs and vegies at 1 1/2 cs:D
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post #10 of 21
Anchor Steam. Body, flavor, color. Hmmm.

Oh. Nicko, I'm sure, would want me to point out =>

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post #11 of 21
NO BEANS!



I mean it.
post #12 of 21
I don't know if you have any microbrews in your area, and especially one that does this, but.........

If you can find it, use an ancho chile beer. So delicious!
post #13 of 21
I'd also say stick with the darker beers. Even though the Irish Ales I'd go to the Stouts (Stouts, Flavored Stout, Imperial Stout, Oatmeal Stout and some Porters...or whatever you have in your area).

The above types may give you a good depth of charactor while trying to escape the finish your trying to evade. (Could it possibly be some of the more bitter hops your tasting?) The Irish Ales are usually low in hops...but perhaps this could be what your tasting...dunno:confused: What specific Irish Ales have you tried...Maybe some of us could find them and give'em a try.

While I'd agree that the beer could add a good deal of flavor, what are you after by using the beer. You could get a nice depth of flavor by using one of the leaner ground beefs and going with a long simmer time. The longer you cook it, the more the flavor deepens.

If it were me...I'd skip some of the condiments (sour cream, cheese) for the use of the leaner ground beef. But then again...I'm not a huge fan of sour cream or cheese in my chilli. So it's easy for me to give up ;)


cheers:beer:

dan
post #14 of 21
Well, sure I'm biased because I live in Belgium and that's what I drink :beer: ....but on the other hand, I have a lot of experience cooking with Belgian beer, and I can tell you that they do lend a LOT of taste to stews. The version of beef stew made with beer (carbonnades) has lots of subtle flavor from the beer, depending on what you use. I prefer Chimay Rouge myself, which is spicy and not too sweet.

Anyways, assuming beef stew is similar enough to chili, it's worth a shot. If you can get it where you are....ask your wine/liquor store for some Belgian beer - or email me and I'll send you a few bottles to try!

cheers
chameleon
post #15 of 21
""Anyways, assuming beef stew is similar enough to chili, it's worth a shot. If you can get it where you are....ask your wine/liquor store for some Belgian beer - or email me and I'll send you a few bottles to try!""

WHAT??!!!!!:eek:
You send me a couple of bottles and I'll send you some chili, or at least the spices so you can make some. Beef Stew?:eek: :eek: :smoking: :beer: :beer: :talk: :D ;)
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post #16 of 21
Why not? You take some meat (beef or turkey), cook garlic & onions in some oil or butter, add spices and a tomato base, some alcohol (wine or beer), and voila - similar enough in my book. So the principles of taste should be roughly similar, no?

Email me and I'll ship you some beers - my husband is sitting here next to me and he wants to defend the honor of the Belgian beer ;-) He is the "grandmaster" of a Belgian brotherhood devoted to beer, so he knows what he's talking about. I promise you'll like it, even if it's just to drink while it's cooking :lol:
post #17 of 21
wait!!!!!!!!!
I said nothing about Belgium beers. In fact I quite fond of them. They are a treat over here, that is why I said I'd rather drink them then cook with them.
Lord knows, I don't want to mess with the "Grandmaster" for the brotherhood devoted to drinking beer. Hail, Hail

I will have you know that I am in contact quite frequently, with the Grand Poobah for the consumption of cheap beers.Hail, Hail!! Lone Star, Pearl, Pabst, Iron City,Ballantine, Olde English, etc.:beer: :beer: :beer: :lol:

as soon as I get home I'm fixin you a care pkg. of spices and a recipe for chili. We don't put nothin that flies in our chili and we add a little hog.
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post #18 of 21
:bounce: :beer: :bounce: :beer: :smiles: :roll: You've got mail.
post #19 of 21
Chameleon, I don't think anyone here is dissing belgian beers, just the opposite, most of us who are beer fans think of many belgian beers as the high point of the brewers art. But, here in the states, they can be pretty expensive and thus I think, when cooking, it is better to find less expensive alternatives. In chili, which is cooked for a long time, and usually has considerable heat from chile peppers the nuances of great beers is lost and you are left with the more basic components, malt, hops, yeasty flavors and a few others. The wonderful esters that compose great belgians get lost in the proccess. That is why I think it is better to drink them than waste them in a chili.
post #20 of 21
I just posted a great chili recipe in the Recipes forum so check it out.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 

beer I have tried

[QUOTE]gonefishin: Sorry it's been a while since I've logged onto this forum -- we have a 6mo baby and been running running running lately :)
But we have tried Warsteiner (German Beer) and Smithwicks (Irish Ale) as of late, but neither of those two gave us what we were looking for either. But after reading through the numerous posts I have other options to try now. So thank you all for your suggestions. We will definitely have fun with them!!;)
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