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Maid Rite Recipe - Page 2

post #31 of 52

I've seen a few people mentioning very simple recipes involving beer now. This is how I was first introduced to them in the bar and grill I worked in, where they were a lunch special and wildly popular.

 

My experience with ingredients has been ground beef, beer, onion, mustard, and a little brown sugar. I've experimented with adding worcestershire sauce or a little tabasco with pretty good results as well.

post #32 of 52

Thank you Jessica.

I have never had Maid Rite, so I like the fact that your recipe is so simple.  I'll definintely try it.

What kind of bread is it served on?

DD

post #33 of 52

Mostly I see standard hamburger buns.

post #34 of 52

OK, I thought maybe since it was "soupy" it would need something more substantial.

 

The only thing in the food world that I really really dislike is soggy bread of any type.

D

post #35 of 52

Any hamburger buns would work.  I don't like to buy the store brand for Maid Rites though, I like something a bit thicker.  The maid rites aren't really soupy, just very loose meat, so you will have meat that falls out of sandwich.  We like to serve them with plain chips, my kids scoop the meat up with those.  SO good.  

Once you add the beer, you let it simmer for a good hour or longer, so the liquid evaporates out of the pan.  You can drain the extra liquid when you are ready to eat it so it isn't soupy.  You will still have the full flavor in the meat.  Sometimes when I am home in afternoon, I cook it in the crock pot.  Then you can simmer it on low for a few hours.   They really are a must try!  I serve them with ketchup, mustard and pickles.  Good luck! 

post #36 of 52

Forgive my ignorance, please.  When we're talking about a "Maid Rite," we're talking about something more generically known as a "loose meat sandwich?"  And that's a lot like a Sloppy Joe, but without all the ketchup/tomato sauce stuff to confuse the taste of the meat?

 

Yes?  No?  Kinda sorta?

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/23/11 at 8:38am
What were we talking about?
 
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #37 of 52

Yeah. Pretty much the same consistency, just less saucy. Maid Rites were originally a specific recipe served at a restaurant chain, and the term has since grown to encompass everyone's attempts to replicate or improve on them.

 

My favorite so far has been cooked in beer, onions, and yellow mustard.

 

 

post #38 of 52

I notice that some Iowans are here so I'd like to know if any of you might have a recipe that beats the Maid-Rite.

There used to be a place in Waterloo, Ia called the Wolf Den. Their loose meat sandwitch had the maide-rite beat by a mile.

Does anyone have it??

Thanks!!!

post #39 of 52

My mom is from Illinois and she made them with ground chuck, a can of french oinon soup, and flour.

post #40 of 52

I've lived in Arizona for a touch over 50 years so I've never even heard of a Maid-Rite, but I'm sure gonna try one of these recipes to see what I've been missing!

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by MithunChowdhury View Post

Maid Rite Recipe for you:

 

Ingredients
2 tablespoons dried chopped onions
3 tablespoons water
1 lb lean ground beef
1 1/2 cups chicken broth (I use Swanson's)
1/2 teaspoon salt (less if broth is salted)
1/2 teaspoon pepper
6 hamburger buns
mustard, to taste
chopped fresh onion, to taste
Directions
1 Soak the dried onions in the water.

2 Crumble ground beef into a hot skillet and cook over medium high heat.

3 When the soaked onions have begun to soften and expand, add it and any remaining water (if any) to the beef.

4 Stir frequently as the meat browns, using a wooden spoon to break the meat into small crumbles.

5 When the meat has browned, add the chicken broth, salt and pepper.

6 Cook until liquid is ALMOST gone, about 10 minutes.

7 Serve meat on buns with mustard and fresh chopped onions.

This is exactly correct in my opinion... believe it or not, the dried onions are a key element.  I add a splash of dill pickle juice as the broth is cooking down and also use white pepper to finish.  Otherwise, exactly the same.  Lived across the street from the "old school" 16th street Moline location for years; had my share of Maid-Rites.  BTW - Maid-Rite pizza's are very tasty!  Cheers - MH

post #42 of 52

In Scottsdale, Arizona is a shop called the Vermont Sandwich Company and I've seen them have this as a special every now & then. Not being from Iowa, so I cannot say how close they are, but I do love them now. Thank You Midwest for an awesome lunch. Maid-Rite made right. Not only this regional sandwich, but they do Beef on Wecks from Buffalo, NY; Muffaletta from NOLA; Cubano's from Ybor City, Fla; and an old new england Meatloaf sammie from Boston Mass. The Art of Sandwich Making is not dead, but revived in the Southwestern desert.

post #43 of 52

I was born and raised in Davenport, IA, and have eaten many, many maid-rites over the years.

 

The following recipe is one that we have used for years(since moving to FL and not having a Maid-Rite close) and is so very close if not spot on as far as taste goes.  It is a simple recipe that must be followed exactly.......

 

Ketchup is not to be found anywhere near a maid-rite...lol.  Chopped onion and yellow mustard are a must.  You can also add cheese for the famous Cheese-Rite.  *I only use 1/2 tsp of pepper now-a-days

 

I hope you enjoy :)

 

Maid-Rite Recipe

1 1/2 lbs ground beef

2 tbsp beef soup base (I use "Better Than Bouillon" brand, comes in a small jar)

1 tsp ground pepper

1 tsp onion powder

1 1/2 cups water

Place ground beef in unheated 2 qt saucepan with lid. Add the seasonings and water. Mash with a potato masher until blended.

Over high heat, continue to mash/stir the mixture until it changes color throughout.

Cover and reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 20-25 minutes or until water has reduced. Removing the lid during last the few minutes helps to reduce the liquid.

post #44 of 52

Hey my friend, the secret to the whole dang thing was he had a butcher shop downstairs ( yea I know it sounds crazy ) all farm raised, meaning corn fed, grass fed, natural ( this beef used to be outstanding in their field, sorry couldn't help myself to the pun )  it just tasted sweeter.  the thing is for every 2lbs of ground meat its 12oz of cola, 2 TBL Sugar. 2tsp Pepper. Thats what most are doing here in Iowa, up to you if you want to steam it or brown it.  Good Luck with it

post #45 of 52

I also worked at the Maid Rite for years and Yes the ingredients come in a brown bag,... is mixed with water and added to the meat as it cooked. There has never been coke, root beer or the such added. I must say they are not as good as they used to be( and I still live in Muscatine and occasionally have to have my maid rite fix ) I think they cheat on the amt of liquid they add now while cooking.  Plus they are totally over priced. The normal family could not afford to take their family and eat there anymore as in the old days. I can actually see why they have to charge so much tho. In the day a waitress would take the order, prepare the order and serve the order, as well as prepare the hamburger meat and make the root beer. Now it takes 10 people to do all this.... so much for lower prices !!

post #46 of 52

The "secret" ingredient is Pepsi/Coke syrup. If you can't find the syrup, just brown the meat in the soda.

post #47 of 52
Your recipe sounds like there's very little " juice". I'm looking for something to serve as real chili. Any ideas of what i could add to it, to give it more of a "soup" look? FYI. I will be using your recipe for chili burgers. Will let you know what my customers think.
post #48 of 52

To all of you, 

 

Muscatine may have been where the idee was instilled, but Marshalltown,  was was where the catsup went down. ;)

 

I am craving, thanks to you all. Marshalltown, IA, is where my family on my father's side, is from.  We grew up around that counter (the good stuff was cooked in the middle of that perimeter, as all of you "Marshallstonians" know.  I truly wish I could be there tmrw.

 

Who needs ketchup?  (I used to work for Chicago Northwestern Railroad, and I'm willing to bet that THEY know what I'm talkin about!

post #49 of 52

Come north into Minnesota and you brown hamburger with onion and black pepper, add tomato soup and a half soup can ketchup, 1/4 cup sugar(takes the bite out of all the tomato) simmer and serve over buns. Yes it sounds simple but it is actually very tasty, I used to bring it into work and we were a bunch of black pepper lovers so I would use 4 times the normal amount.

post #50 of 52

IOWA"S *Maid Rites!! Slow cooker loose meat sandwich.. 2 T. dried onions, 1 T. warm water, 3 lbs ground beef, 1 beef boullion cube, 1 chicken boullion cube, 1 1/2 c. water, 1 T. worchestershire sauce, 1 T. soy sauce, 2 T. cider vinegar, 2 T. brown sugar. KEEPER!

 

Yummy!

 

If you sprinkle a little flour over the meat before cooking, they'll hold together better, but most people don't mind them being loose.

post #51 of 52

The recipe looks so good

post #52 of 52

I like your sense of humor! ;)

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