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What to do with old knives?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have a cleaver that has reached the point of no return (at least not worth anymore effort from me). What should I do with it? Do you have any unique ideas for keeping knives with sentimental value?

This was my first knive and I kinda feel torn about just tossing it out even though I will never use it again. And I can't really pass it along since it won't take an edge anymore.

The long version of my story: When I was a young'un (about 13yo), I bought my first knive...it was a cleaver. Nothing special...it was maybe $15 and had a hollow plastic handle and a tenderizing tip.

Anyways, here I am 18 years later and I still have it. I don't remember the last time I used it. BUUUUUUT I do remember sharpening it last year...and since then I have used it MAYBE once.

Anyways, I pulled it out this weekend and the edge was completely gone. In fact, I worked it for almost an hour on a course sharpening stone and mid-grit stone...and NOTHING. It just would not sharpen (yes, I was doing it correctly...not a novice at sharpening).

What are your thoughts?
post #2 of 10
Take it to a professional and have them try to grind a whole new edge on and buff it up real nice... then put it on a wall in the kitchen with a plaque:

"Method of punishment for those who do not follow the rules"
post #3 of 10
Donate to an artist! :D
post #4 of 10
We put old knives in our tool collection to use on those occasions when you need a knife but you don't want to use the good kitchen ones.
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
Reply
post #5 of 10
Want to know where most used, beat up Chef's knives end up?
-They get violently and drastically reground to a new shape, then sharpened up

What kind of a shape?

Boning knife

The meat packing and poultry places eat up these knives, a boning knife won't last more than few weeks there, then it finally gets tossed out.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #6 of 10
You could pretty it up a bit and put it in a shadow box for display.
post #7 of 10
I would definately keep the cleaver... Polish it and use it for a cheese/bread presentation tray :confused: always a good story goes with it, or some type of plaque. Then again I am a pack rat....
Just my .02 worth.
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
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Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
post #8 of 10
Guess you could use it to crack lobster claws? It'd be perfect, all dull and stuff. Don't have to figure out which side to use.

That or use it to precision pare down firewood for kindling.
post #9 of 10

Clear resin Cheese plate?

I might have someone create a clear plate around the knife. I know that places have bars with stuff floating in them and that you can buy your own resin for projects, there must be someone who can do it somewhere online. It is just a way to create a new use, a new memory of, your knife.
post #10 of 10
Nice idea, Im going to check it out
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