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Princess cake

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 




Can any one tell me how to get the marzipan smooth on the top of this cake, the dome is cream, ;-))) thank you. qahtan
post #2 of 16
I would try rolling out like any other rolled icing, roll it onto your arm or rolling pin where you can start in the middle and gently set it into place, beginning in the middle. Then smooth the sides. The soft cream dome should allow any air to naturally escape if you go slowly...or maybe there is more to it that I don't realize...?
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

princess cake

Unfortunately is is not quite that simple, as right underneath the marzipan is whipped cream. :-(((( thanks any way... qahtan
post #4 of 16
I broke down when I made a wedding princess cake and used a layer of butter cream between the marzipan and wc. WC will make the marzipan melt.
:lol:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #5 of 16
Just a thought from a non-pro: can you assemble it upside down in a bowl? Line the bowl with the marzipan sheet and smooth it. Then add the "top" layer of whipped cream or buttercream, and smooth it to a flat surface. Build the cake layers and filling on top of that. Fill in the space between the marzipan and the cake with the filling/frosting. Trim the marzipan and invert the whole thing onto the platter.

But this is what Gale Gand said about it on Food TV.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #6 of 16

What about using stabilized extra heavy cream...

I'd use it for certain pastries that had to hold up for a buffet.

It's a little heavier than non, but it might work.

Seems like an awful lot of whipped cream...

(sorry but I had a bad experience when I was a child involving banana splits and running out of ice cream...) :blush:

April
post #7 of 16
Here are the assembly directions from a website that includes the exact photo you posted.

"To Assemble the Princess Cake:
1. Using a long serrated knife, level the top(s) of the cakes. If you used a 9 x 2-inch pan, cut the cake into three even layers; if you used two 9 x 1 1/2-inch pans, cut the thicker layer into two even layers. Place the top layer of the cake, cut side down, on a 9-inch cake cardboard. Brush it lightly with soaking solution, being careful not to oversoak it. Spread the cake with a thin layer of the raspberry jam. (You should almost be able to see through it.) Spread a 1/4-inch-thick layer of the whipped cream over the raspberry jam. Set the middle layer of the cake on the whipped cream. Brush it with soaking solution and then spread it with a 3/8-inch-thick layer of pastry cream. Place the remaining cake layer, cut side down, on the top of the pastry cream. Brush it with soaking solution.

2. Using a metal icing spatula, coat the side of the cake with a 1/8-inch-thick coat of whipped cream. There should be just enough whipped cream to seal in all the crumbs and to prevent the marzipan from resting directly on the cake.

3. Mound the remaining whipped cream on the top of the cake and, using a metal icing spatula, spread into a dome so that the cake almost looks like an upside-down bowl. Soften the edge where the top of the genoise ends and the dome begins by beveling it with the flat part of the spatula.

4. Bring the marzipan to room temperature at least 1 hour before assembling the cake. Before attempting to cover a cake with marzipan for the first time, practice covering an inverted 8- or 9-inch bowl. Once you are comfortable with this technique, gather up the marzipan, knead it into a ball and reroll to cover the cake.

5. Lightly dust the work surface with confectioners' sugar. Place the marzipan on the surface and, using an 18-inch-wide rolling pin, roll out the marzipan as you would pie dough, into a 16-inch circle, 1/8 inch thick. Frequently dust the marzipan with plenty of confectioners' sugar and turn the circle to make sure the marzipan is not sticking to the work surface. Using your hand, brush off the excess confectioners' sugar. Don't worry if a lot of confectioners' sugar clings to the marzipan; it will be absorbed.

6. Set the cake near the rolled out marzipan, about 6 inches away from the edge of the work surface, so that you can see and reach around the entire cake. Loosely roll the marzipan onto the rolling pin, starting at the back and rolling toward you.

7. Lift the rolling pin with the marzipan rolled around it. Unroll the marzipan over the cake, starting at the front and unrolling toward the back, while making sure to cover the entire cake and cardboard. When finished, some marzipan should drape onto the work surface all around the cake.

8. At this point, the dome of the cake will be smoothly covered, but there will be folds or creases on the sides. To remove the folds and creases, lift the outside edge of the marzipan with a hand on either side of a fold and, without tearing or stretching, gently pull the marzipan out and down until the fold disappears.

9. Work your way around the cake. Once all the folds are eliminated, rub the palm of your hand around the sides of the cake to further smooth it and eliminate air pockets.

10. With a rolling pizza cutter or small, sharp knife, carefully cut off the excess marzipan along the bottom edge of the cake cardboard. (The cardboard should not show.) Reserve for making leaves.

11. Slide the icing spatula under the cake cardboard and tilt the cake up enough to get the palm of your other hand underneath to lift it without touching the sides. Turn the cake, checking to make sure the cake and cardboard are completely covered with the marzipan. If not, gently push the marzipan down, using the palm of your other hand.

12. Set the cake down and sift a fine dusting of confectioners' sugar over it. Transfer to a serving platter.

13. Cut three elongated ovals about 3 inches long by 1 inch wide out of the remaining marzipan to make three leaf shapes. Lightly score the top of the leaves with a knife to create veins. Gently blend each leaf into a leaflike curve. Place the marzipan leaves, spaced evenly apart, on the center of the domed cake top with the steam ends touching. Gently press the stem ends into the dome to secure the leaves to the top of the cake.

14. Cut the rose stem 2 inches below the flower. Lift the sepals so they will set over the marzipan leaves and insert the rose into the center of the dome.

15. The finished princess cake may be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days, but it is best the day it is made. Remove the cake from the refrigerator 30 [minutes before serving?]"

Source: Birthday Cakes: Recipes and Memories from Celebrated Bakers by Kathryn Kleinman, Text by Carolyn Miller

I've never done one of these, so I can't offer any personal advise, but I hope that this helps.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

Princess cake

Thanks every one for trying to help me with this cake, or should I say with applying the marzipan to the cake.

April, yes I do stabilize cream often so that it will stand a while longer.

Also I have also thought of putting the whole together in a bowl.

And I notice the recipe and method from TV Food network they have an extra skirt??? round the base, does that hide a multitude of pleats etc.

I noticed also that at the cream at it's highest point is 1 1/2 inches.

Thanks again, qahtan
post #9 of 16
I couldn't read through all the wonderful methods, I do want to mention that the marzipan is much easier to apply if your main cake is elevated a couple of inches of the working surface. If you have a 10" cake put a 3" high by 6" diameter under the cake to elevate it.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

Princess Cake, I think i've got it.

Wow you know I think I have solved a way to do this Princess cake, I should have thought of this before.
For special occasions I some times make a brandy cream roll, where the whole of the centre of the genoese jelly roll is whipped cream.
Why don't I make the cream for the Princess cake the same way.I think it might work.... qahtan
GLORY'S BRANDY CREAM ROLL
This is my own cake. I thought you might like this for a some special time. Over the winter I do prepare the decoration in case I want to do this cake.

I will cover the underside of small leaves with a thin layer of melted chocolate, leave to cool and set, and carefully peel off the leaf, and store the "choc leaves" between wax paper until required, not in the fridge.

I make a genoise sponge, 6 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1/2 cup melted butter, and 1 cup flour, I make this in a large bakers sheet about 18 x 12 x 1-1/2, When comes from the oven I roll it as jelly roll long way, let cool.

Then I make the brandy cream, dissolve 1 level teaspoon plain gelatine in 1 tablespoon of water, not easy to dissolve, you may have to warm it.

1 cup heavy cream, 2 tablespoons sugar, beat cream and sugar to begin to stiffen, add gelatine and beat to quite thick and stiff.

Slowly add 4 tablespoon brandy or your choice, and mix that into cream.

Unroll jelly roll, now cold, remove the centre so that it would roll up but the centre hollow, fill with ALL brandy cream, roll up, place seam side down on long plate/board, then make a quick choc icing, icing/confectioners sugar with enough boiling water to make a nice spreading texture icing, add some cocoa (not choc powder) mix well, be fairly quick as this icing will form a skin, spread over roll, decorate with choc leaves, place in fridge at let rest and set over night.

DO NOT KEEP IT TOO LONG, else the choc icing will go yucky.

Best cut on the diagonal. Enjoy.
post #11 of 16
Um, uh, er.....why has no one mentioned freezing the cake? I do this all the time. Whipped cream freezes fine (as long as it's whipped). I'd just assemble the cake, spread the whipped cream on and dome it. Then freeze. Then cover cake with marzipan, just like I would with fondant. I've done this dozens (no, make that hundreds) of times.......:confused:
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Freezing the Princess cake....

Thank you, I think it was a case of not seeing the forest for the trees, yes of course that is a good idea,, thank you. qahtan
post #13 of 16

melting marzipan....

The only issue I have had with that is the marzipan melting off the cake from the moisture in the wc. I had an over night test and it ran.
so I froze the wc, iced it with butter cream, let that set and covered with rolled marzipan for a full evening drip free pf greem marzipan goodness. :bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #14 of 16
No kidding? Wow. I can see how buttercream would solve the problem.
Are you back east? I've talked to other cake people who've had to deal with major humidity woes out there.....I've heard of melting fondant and marzipan, etc........
post #15 of 16

east meets west!

yes i am. love your site btw.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #16 of 16
When you freeze cakes with rolled icings, you get a sweaty, gooey mess from the condensation.

At school we also did this cake with scraps. We cubed the cakes scraps, added a hint of the filling and then German Butter cream and mounded it on the top.

It' s not a true "Princess" cake , but a great way to use up some cake scraps??
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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