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Variations of hollandaise

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Wha are some good flavor combinations to make variations of hollandaise to go with various protiens??
post #2 of 19
there ar endless amounts, of compound sauces from hollandaise,
invest in a copy of le repetoire, i think thats the spelling, its a little tough to understand but they will have all the classic derivetives listed from a basic sauce.
post #3 of 19
Bernaise goes good with pretty much anything imho
post #4 of 19
Maltaise is another popular one.

Add some mole into your hollandaise. Goes good with barbacoa and eggs. :)
post #5 of 19

'asian' is a good idea? maybe

try some finely chopped / grated ginger. wasabi mustard. thick indonesian 'kecap manis'. it is very thick you need only a few drops.
variations are indeed endless, but keep in mind 'hollandaise' is the MAIN sauce, the rest is here to flavor and enhanceand to make it more interesting.
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post #6 of 19
Im a big fan of foyot, which is a hollandaise with the addition of a brown sauce

Truffles are obviously great

We are using Bacon and bacon fat this menu cycle, "bacon and eggs" yah know...

Just think about anything thats natural with eggs... Probably will work very well. Possibilities are endless
post #7 of 19
Uh... Foyot should be with glace de viande. Choron is with saute'd tomato paste. Seen everything from lemon (zest and juice) to grapefruit, to pesto.
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post #8 of 19
Agree here. If you're mixing in liquids make sure they're reduced to glace stage.

Anyone here ever try the various "benedict" variations at breakfast places, uh, like Perkins?
post #9 of 19
interestingly enough I was at the grocery store and noticed packaged hollandaise/bernaise powder in the spice section. The idea of instant hollandaise turned me of, but I think Im gonna pick it up next time to see how it compares
post #10 of 19
Don't waste your money or your time.
post #11 of 19
The above suggestions have mainly been on creating other sauces that use hollandaise as a component. There are legions of those.

You may also wish to explore using different components to the hollandaise itself. For instance, substituting another citrus for lemon juice. Orange hollandaise? Lime hollandaise? Yuzu hollandaise? Or different kinds of vinegars or other acids.

Take it from here and see where you can go.
post #12 of 19
The book "le répertoire de la cuisine" by August Lescofier is a book that could help you. It takes all the classic preparastions and show you all the variations. you will pay 20$ top.
post #13 of 19

just practice making it over an open flame, and also bringing back a broken sauce with an ice cold bowl with a touch of ice water. forget the knorrswiss, it's garbage.

post #14 of 19

Hollandaise made with dark brown butter is delicious. Substituting another fat for some of the butter can be good too, think duck fat or bacon fat. 

 

I also like to make my hollandaise with whole melted butter, not clarified (at least, when I am making a "regular" holly). I think if you can incorporate some of the milk solids and whatnots, it gives it a much richer, fuller, rounder butter flavor than just clarified. 

post #15 of 19
We do a smoked tomato hollandaise with some in house made smoked tomato reduction, terragon reduction, a little dales, tabasco & lemon juice
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefInTraining View Post

Wha are some good flavor combinations to make variations of hollandaise to go with various protiens??


Maltaise- blood orange juice and zest

Choron- Tomato puree

Bearnaise- Tarragon, peppercorn and shallot in acid reduction, chervil and tarragon after it's been put through the chinois

Mousseline- Whipped cream folded in

Noisette- Beurre noisette instead of whole or clarified butter

Paloise- Mint in the acid reduction and again after the chinois straining

 

 

These are just some classic derivatives I can think of off the top of my head. An old school text like Larousse Gastronomique would be a good starting point. Really hollandaise can become anything you want it to be by altering the components to your liking. As the fat component think about nut oils, duck fat, pumpkin seed oil, confit oils like garlic and thyme, specialty butters like sheep's or goats or even some high quality butters like Insigny from France or a nice cultuted butter from Vermont. As the acid reduction think about various citruses like lime or yuzu, fine vinegars like champagne or px sherry or a sweet wine like vin santo or an apple cider. Aromatics could be anything you can think of from truffles, ginger, calabrian chili, scallions, lemongrass etc. Sometimes different sauces are combined with hollandaise such as glaces or veloutes, stocks like reduced fumet and wine for fish dishes, mustards, creme fraiche etc. You can even alter the egg component with duck, pheasant or goose eggs.

post #17 of 19
We did a duck Benedict with confit thigh, duck eggs and used foie fat to make the hollandaise.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post

We did a duck Benedict with confit thigh, duck eggs and used foie fat to make the hollandaise.


Oh man, that sounds right up my alley. Me likes! Did did you use as a bread component?

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post #19 of 19
A fluffy buttermilk biscuit split in half, it was rich but amazing.
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