or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Scaling Recipes

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
G'day All...

I'm coming from a restaurant with few tables, and brining recipes to a substantially larger volume, and I need to scale my recipes ALOT higher.

Any advice on the best way to scale to a much higher volume? I'm banging my head trying to go through each one....

THANKS in advance for your help!
post #2 of 4
It's tough. You may be able to scale it 2x or even 4x, but eventually the small inconsequential things will multiply. So a small cake can tolerate a little variance in baking soda. Multiply that 20x and it may turn into a problem. Second, production methods will have to change. You can't just mix the batter in your old 5qt trusty old Kitchenaid anymore.

If it were me, I'd convert all to metric and go from there.
post #3 of 4
One of my first culinary instructors was a former Army cook. He could prepare a scrumptious meal whether there were five guests or five hundred guests. His advice for scaling recipes was to prepare the necessary quantity of food by simply multiplying the ingredients to fit the scale and let your taste tell you what needs to be adjusted. That did not, of course, apply to baking issues. I've never prepared a meal for five hundred, but I have prepared them for 200 or more and his advice has never failed me.
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
Reply
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
Reply
post #4 of 4

Large format recipes

Try using cooking school text. They are all setup for 25 plus serviing and can be adjusted. Many of them have most standard recipes for stock, soups and etc... coved and you can use them to size up your recipes. I have also found that some recipe software have scaling features. Menu Magic from the USPCA (United States Personal Chef ) has this feature.

Good Luck

Slate
Failure is the key to success;
Each mistake teaches us something.
- Morihei Ueshiba
Reply
Failure is the key to success;
Each mistake teaches us something.
- Morihei Ueshiba
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking