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A Question About Egg Whites

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Often I find myself with lots of extra and left over egg whites because of a special diet I feed my cats. I hate just dumping the whites down the drain - I don't make egg dishes too often so incorporating the whites into omelettes, etc., would be a rare occurance. But, what about adding egg whites into recipes that call for whole eggs? If a recipe calls for X-number of whole eggs, could I use less whole eggs and supplement their number with whites? I'm sure it depends on what's cooking, but I wonder if there might be a formula or technique that will provide an appropriate conversion. Any comments?

Thanks,

Shel
post #2 of 19
maybe instead of incorperating them into other recipes you can amke things with the egg whites, omlettes, meringues, etc.
pan
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post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for jumping in ... I hate egg white omelettes, although I don't mind adding extra egg white on the rare ocassions when I do make omelettes. Never cared for meringue either.

I suppose since i don't care much for things made with only egg whites, I've never really fully explored the possibilities, but my dislike for egg whites goes back to early childhood ...

Shel
post #4 of 19
First of all, buy medium or small eggs. The whites of smaller eggs contain less water so, whatever you decide to use them for, they'll be more dense.
You could use them for a facial (if you're into that kind of thing) or you could use them in an Angel Food Cake (they take lots of egg whites - and the whites from the smaller eggs will stiffen up better because of the reduced water content).
How about making a Meringue to top your favorite pie?
There are many uses for left over egg whites.
You can freeze egg whites. Try freezing them in individual containers (like large ice cube trays) and then store them in a closed container. I thaw mine in the refrigerator, never at room temperature. I treat them like raw poultry for safety's sake.
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My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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post #5 of 19
S**t....when life gives you whites make meringues.....so many types....vanilla, chocolate, raspberry, spiced, floral, citrus....you name it. Also you can bake cakes or lighten up your pancakes or even make souffles. Possibilities are endless.
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post #6 of 19
Use them for breading fried items instead of whole eggs. They'd be fine for the coating for chile rellenos.

You could do a souffle still, it would just be paler and less rich.

Brush various breads and pastries. Seal egg rolls, pot stickers, empanadas and so on.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 19
If you substitute egg whites for whole eggs in recipes, it will have the following effects:
  1. The finished item will be less rich, because yolks contain fat.
  2. An emulsified sauce might not hold together as well, because yolks act as emulsifiers (I'm guessing about this one).
  3. The finished item will be drier.
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post #8 of 19

Best source of protein...

I don't know what your lifestyle is... But egg whites are one of the best complete proteins around. They are used by athletes and bodybuilders to supplement their diet etc.

I use them in protein shakes in the mornings with milk and fruit. 3 or 4 egg whites, a banana, cup or so of milk and any other flavor you like (chocolate syrup, instant coffee etc) in a blender for a minute.

Add any sort of carb if you eat them and its a great quick breakfast.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for your thoughts and suggestions.

Shel
post #10 of 19
always good for a raft
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post #11 of 19
I have recipes for brewing coffee using a raft!!!:bounce:

Make some butter cream with swiss meringue and freeze until it's birthday cake time!
bake first, ask questions later.
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #12 of 19
As Lewis Black would say wa wa wa wa what??????????
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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
LB is a funny guy. What's a "raft?"

Shel
post #14 of 19
Not an expert here, but basically its used for clarifying liquids such as stocks for consomme etc. I believe you mix the whites with ground beef and some other stuff and it floats then sinks in the stock and leaves it very clear and yummy :-)

Feel free to elaborate anyone with a better explanation...

Jason
post #15 of 19
Jason,
pretty spot on, but how do you do this with coffee. It's freezing here and I want to try
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #16 of 19
I think I will try to make a coffee consomme....might be tricky but do you think if I use whites, some fruit and maybe an avocado it could work for a raft?
All perfections have imperfections.
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All perfections have imperfections.
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post #17 of 19
Shel,

I'm curious about the special diet your cats are on and how the yolks are incorporated into it and what health benefits the cats can gain from eating yolks.

Would you mind elaborating a little?

thanks,
h.
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Sure ... Talking about my cats is one of my favorite past times :lol:

First of all, the cats are on a raw food diet which consists of meat such as turkey or chicken thighs, ostrich, duck thighs or legs, lamb, and other meats - not all at the same time, however. Each meal consists of a single meat element. The meat is usually provided in chunks large enough that they have to chew on ‘em a bit in order to exercise their jaws and provide some resistance and abrasiveness to help reduce tarter on their teeth.

Along with the meat they get chicken or turkey liver, or some liver from whatever species of meat they’re eating if I can find it. Chicken hearts are also added to the mix when appropriate. The liver and hearts are an excellent source of taurine, which is important for their health.

In addition, they get some amendments, such as calcium to balance out the potassium in the raw meat, plus some salmon oil, vitamin E, vitamin B complex. I also add some wheat bran for "roughage."

At times they get pieces of raw chicken necks, which they love, and which really helps keep their teeth clean and free from tartar build up and prevents gingivitis. The necks are perfect treats, providing an excellent balance of potassium and calcium, and the bones are easily chewed and quite digestible. My boy Buddy is almost nine years old and has never needed any dental work or to have his teeth cleaned.

Every few days (when being fed poultry), and especially when I’m out of liver, they get a raw egg yolk added to the mixture, although some days they’ll get liver and egg yolk - I like to vary their meals to keep ‘em coming back for more <LOL>. Yolks provide excellent nutrition and are easily digestible, and also make a nice little snack for them just by themselves every now and then.

I’d be happy to answer any more questions you may have. You can go here http://www.felinefuture.com/ to find out more about what I’m doing and why.

Shel
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Whoops! Wherever I wrote potassium I meant phosphorous. Sorry. I often get them confused.

Shel
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