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WHAT!? Is the difference between gourmet and Home-style

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
WHAT!? Is the difference between gourmet and Home-style
I like home style Restaurants especially Italian
BUT
What is the Actual technical definition?
post #2 of 15
I'm no professional, but I always thought Homestyle was where the servings for each dish are for 4 or more people. Gourmet is regular style, where each entree serves one person.
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"Not all chemicals are bad. Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer." -Dave Barry
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post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
I thought it was like Gorumet was Marth, and Julia Child and Homestyle was like Paula Deen, and Patti LaBelle
post #4 of 15

Gourmet...

Smaller portions, fancier names, prettier and you can charge a s*load for it!

Homestyle:
Good ol' glop that makes you happy cuz your momma used to make it.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
April
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thats It
Perfect
Thank You!
post #6 of 15
Great Example:

Grits on a menu $ 2.99

Polenta on a menu $ 4.99

Jim
post #7 of 15
think good bread,veal chops nice wine list..now think dinner rolls,chicken parm. and a cold beer or sprite..bt the way both good!:D
post #8 of 15
"Home-style" is like mom (or grandma) used to make- good hearty food, comfortable atmosphere. Gourmet is a step up... more inventive, presentation, plusher atmosphere (and oh yeah, the higher bill at the end....LOL)
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
So there is no difference in actual cooking style?
Eg. Is gormuet more exact w/ measurements?
post #10 of 15
My defination would be the difference in the price and type of ingredients used. When i think of "gourmet" I think of being able to start with the best or highest quality ingredients I could find not predicated by price as much as quality. When I think of "homestyle" I think of trying to make the best, most nutritious food possible on a limited budget. Of course I guess that depends on the kind of home you grew up in...
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #11 of 15
I'm a home cook; I've never had any training I've paid for (not with money, anyway :D). When I make dishes I learned to cook from Mom, my grandmother. It's food a person would make in his/her own home and not as part of a business. It's cooking for daily sustenance.

Gourmet to me is tasting food purely for the enjoyment of the food- as an adventure or sensory experience, such as the time I had gnocchi with white truffled shaved on them. It was purely a food adventure for me. Now if your mom made her gnocchi with shavings from a cue-ball sized white truffle as a typical weeknight dish, that'd be homestyle to you I suppose! :eek:
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post #12 of 15
Mezz- If you find THAT mom- tell her I am willing to be adopted......LOL
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #13 of 15
Home cooking is "comfort food". It's the sort of cooking that fills you up and which you can rely upon for long lasting calories.

Gormet cooking (as has been said) is cooking for the sheer enjoyment of the senses. Gormet cooking uses rarer ingredients, more aromatic and gastronomic cues, and relies upon presentation as part of it's appeal. It's also part exploratory by the diner and that exploration is exciting given that people are hard wired to eat only "safe" foods (foods which they know to be safe because they've eaten them before and not sickened as a result). The "risk" of eating foods you've not eaten before is akin to an adrelin high to your basic instincts. This is part of the thrill of gormet dining.

There's also the art component as well as the perfectionism issue. People appreciate the fact that the chef did his best to prepare something special just for them. From presentation to taste it's the chef's best display of his talent.
post #14 of 15
Jayme, let's both look! We could be siblings. :lol:
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post #15 of 15
Well, if your family lived on a white truffle "farm", you might be having them shaved over pasta as a pretty typical family dinner :).

Although there is a relationship the mind typically draws between home-style and "gourmet" (I personally feel something can be both home-style and gourmet or neither in addition to being one or the other), in the greater scheme of restaurant labels it's as inaccurate as labeling a foodstuff as "natural".
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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