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Kitchen Terminology Glossary & Pronunciation Guide

post #1 of 34
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The ChefTalk Incomplete Guide to Kitchen Terminology & Pronunciation
as created by the contributors to the web's greatest food resource... ChefTalk!

Use this thread to post common (and not so common) references to kitchen terminology as well as the pronunciation of those terms.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #2 of 34
Mise en Place: Meez-ahn-plahs

EVOO: Eee-voh ;)

Mirepoix: Meer-pwah
post #3 of 34
kuan,

You got the pronunciation right but forgot to add the definition...

Mise en Place: The perfect goodness that satisfies the soul of any cook worth his salt that should never, under any circumstances, be touched by any person wearing all black and a bistro apron who has not first provided that cook with a stiff glass of bourbon whiskey.
post #4 of 34
Kuan- LOL
no- EVOO- eevee oh oh- but, after you say it in this manner, you owe Rachel Ray $1.00 in royalties (or is that Shel??)

Lets see, what are some I have looked up-
Charcuterie- shar-COO-tuhr-ree- the making of cold meat items such as pates, & galantines. As well as the preparation of sausages.

Arborio- ar-BOHR-eoh- small grained rice used to make risotto

Galatte- ga-LAHT- a tart pastry with either sweet or savory filling

ganache- ga-NOSH- a rich mixture of chocolate and heavy cream, usually used as a frosting

bechamel- bay-sha-MELL- a sauce made with milk and roux and seasonings, one of the classic mother sauces.
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #5 of 34
The Brigade - At a glance

Executive Chef: (ex-ec-u-tive shef) Depending on your kitchen... The guy/gal who does the least amount of work and makes the most money or the guy/gal who works harder/faster/better than everyone else and runs the whole damned thing in the kitchen.

Wikipedia Definition: The executive chef is in charge of everything related to the kitchen, including menu creation, personnel management and business aspects. The executive chef can also be referred to as the "head chef" or "chef". However, use of the word "chef" for cook or kitchen helper, or a fast food operator.They have the biggest responsibilites.

Chef De Cuisine: (shef day quiz een) This person is in charge of running the kitchen in the Executive Chef's absence which can be all the time, for extended periods of time etc. In a situation where an Executive Chef/Owner has multiple concepts or properties this is the guy'gal who runs the show all the time and gets none of the credit for the food because everyone still assumes it's really Todd English back there on the line just because his name is on the door.

Wikipedia Definition: The chef de cuisine's placement within the kitchen can vary depending on the individual restaurant's hierarchy. Generally, it is equivalent to an executive sous chef position.

Sous Chef: (soo shef) The guy/gal doing all the "heavy lifting" (hard work) and getting no kudos for it. Depending on your kitchen this person's job description might include cleaning up the Executive Chef's vomit and helping him/her to his/her car after the shift or dumping him/her in a cab.

Wikipedia Definition: The Sous Chef is the direct assistant of the executive chef.The sous chef often shares some duties with the executive chef, such as menu planning, costing and ordering. Larger kitchens often have more than one sous chef, with each covering a certain shift or having his or her own area of responsibility, such as the banquet sous chef, in charge of all banquets, or the executive sous chef, in charge of all other sous chefs.

Expeditor: (ex-pah-die-ter) Pain in the a** who makes things overly complicated attempting to placate waitresses with PMT/PMS every day of the month who might someday brush against him accidentally and make his day.

Wikipedia Definition: The expeditor - a role generally held by the sous chef - serves as the liaison between the customers in the dining room and the line cooks. With the help of proper coordination and timing, they make sure that the food gets to the wait staff in a timely fashion, so that everyone sitting at a particular table is served simultaneously.

Chef De Partie: (shef day partee) Not as fun as it sounds these chefs rarely end up doing any partying and are generally overworked and get sh** on by the higher level managing chefs.

Wikipedia Definition: A chef de partie, also known as a "station chef" or "line cook", is in charge of a particular area of production. In large kitchens, each station chef might have several cooks and/or assistants. In most kitchens however, the station chef is the only worker in that department. Line cooks are often divided into a hierarchy of their own, starting with "First Cook", then "Second Cook", and so on as needed.

Saucier: (saw-see-ay) That jag off who keeps burning the sauce.

Wikipedia Definition: Prepares sauces, stews, and hot hors d'oeuvres, and sautées foods to order. This is usually the highest position of all the stations.

Poissonier: (pwa-sohn-ee-ay) The expert cooker of all things fish.

Wikipedia Definition: Prepares fish dishes (this station may be handled by the saucier in some kitchens).

Entremetier: (on-trah-met-ee-ay) The guy/gal with the easiest cake walk of a job in the kitchen. These duties could be assigned to other people but since this kid is someone's nephew...

Wikipedia Definition: Prepares vegetables, soups, starches, and eggs. Large kitchens may divide these duties among the vegetable cook, the fry cook, and the soup cook.

Rotisseur: (ro-tee-sur) In a big kitchen is that guy/gal drenched in sweat who nobody notices is one of the most talented sumbit**es in the kitchen but he/she never gets the recognition he/she deserves.

Wikipedia Definition: Prepares roasted and braised meats and their gravies, and broils meats and other items to order. A large kitchen may have a separate broiler cook or grillardin (gree-yard-ahn) to handle the broiled items. The broiler cook may also prepare deep-fried meats and fish.

Garde Manger: (guard mahn-zhay) The guy in the kitchen who's job is of abjectly vital importance who has to be really good with lots of things. This person must understand what goes well in salads and what texture/color/flavor contrasts will work well with cheeses/salads/dressings/etc. Is THE most important job in the kitchen if you ask me. Or in my kitchen is that guy that gets really mad when I keep telling him Radicchio just doesn't go with everything and just because a cheese is artisanal doesn't make it taste good.

Wikipedia Definition: Is responsible for cold foods, including salads and dressings, pâtés, cold hors d'oeuvres, and buffet items.

Pâtissier: (pah-tiss-ee-ay) Makes pastries and desserts and is always covered in flour, chocolate or both. This poor soul is always sugary, sweaty and in need of a break.

Wikipedia Definition: Prepares pastries and desserts.

Tournant: (toor-nahnt) Knows how to do every job in the kitchen and is usually the first one looked at to become the new Sous Chef if the old one falls down some stairs or is gently pushed in front of a bus... by accident!

Wikipedia Definition: Replaces other station heads.
Mike

“If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.” -- Zaphod Beeblebrox
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Mike

“If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.” -- Zaphod Beeblebrox
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post #6 of 34
[

runs the show all the time and gets none of the credit for the food because everyone still assumes it's really Todd English back there on the line just because his name is on the door.


Mike- LOL OMG that is too funny- of course Todd IS there- well actually he's in Vegas now..... LOL
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #7 of 34
I am working on a french website that is actually a cooking dictionnary :
http://www.mondegourmet.com

I have actually never tought about putting the pronunciation, but would be a good idea.
If someone speaking both english english and french is interrested in helping me to translate some of the articles, it would also be nice.
post #8 of 34

Size of vegetable cutting

Brunoise = 2x2 mm
Macedoine = 4x4 mm
Julinne = 1or2 mm x 1or2 mm x 4-8 cm
Jadiniere = 4mm x 4mm x 3 cm
Paysanne = 5mm x 5mm x 1 mm ( for leek 1 cm long et 1 mm thickness)
post #9 of 34
Nice site, très beau :)
post #10 of 34
This is my favor site to learn french cuisine.

The Worldwide Gourmet

i love ro read about recipe and learn about products

What do you think????

"mon amour est là, la cuisine"
post #11 of 34
True Dat!!!!
post #12 of 34

Evoo

EVOO - Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Everytime Rachael Ray uses this [acro] she makes me crazy.


theCrackedApple.com
post #13 of 34
We need some spanish terms:

cuchillo- cu-chee-yo knife
cuchara- cu-char-a spoon also tablespoon
cucharadita- cu-char-a-dee-ta teaspoon
tazo- ta-so cup
bolsa- bol-sa bag
chingadera- ching-a-der-a "thing" you can also use cosa

ebullición- e-bu-yi-si-own boil or simmer
parrilla- pa-ri-ya grill
mezcla- mex-cla mix/blend

apio- a-PEE-o celery
pimiento- PI-mi-en-to pepper, usually black
perejil- pe-re-hil parsley
cumino- cu-mi

escoba- es-co-ba broom
jabon- ha-bon soap
piso- pi-so floor
post #14 of 34
My favorite:

risotto: rizz-OT-Toh - an Italian rice dish that can be served as a starter or main course. Risotto should never be served to Chef Gordon Ramsay unless the cook making it is absolutely certain that the dish is made correctly. [Some people] have an annoying tendency to pronounce the dish, incorrectly, as rizz-Owe-toe and need to get a clue. :lol:


(edited to remove incorrect generalization) :rolleyes:
"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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post #15 of 34
That would be an incorrect generalization.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #16 of 34
Fun read...
post #17 of 34
blanch - [blansh] - a process of food preparation wherein the food substance, usually a vegetable or fruit, is plunged into boiling water, removed after a brief, timed interval and finally plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water (shocked) to halt the cooking process.
post #18 of 34

More spanish ('cuz we all need it)

esto es caliente: what you yell just before you throw a hot sheet pan into the dish area

déme esa chingaderra: give me that thing at witch I'm pointing furiously at.

démelo papi: I'll be needing that right now!

mi manera o la carretera: How you explain that, that is just simply the way it is done.

más rápidamente pinche picasso : I'd like you to plate a little faster

just a few we use around the kitchen,
-ciao
mike
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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post #19 of 34

Kitchen Terminology : E'spuma

Dear Chefs,
i have come across this term, E'SPUMA / ESPUMA, several times in menus but i dont know what it is/where it comes from/what it tastes like etc.
please enlighten...
japvir
post #20 of 34
I believe it to mean- "to foam" or "froth" in Italian - I'm pretty sure it's the verb of "schiuma" wich is translated directly to "foam"
-ciao
mike
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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post #21 of 34
Translated from Spanish it means "it foams" probably more accurate.
Foams are nice but very overuesed.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #22 of 34

Spanish

for foam - "espuma", which I am sure is close to Italian if not the same.
post #23 of 34
Why OH WHY did this thread die? LMAO
Are we posting for the brand newbie? Or for the more experienced line/kitchen personnel?
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
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Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #24 of 34
I am posting this from another site...cause OMG it describes it is perfect detail...
I have included the link (to give credit to the author)...Tho i hope it doesnt get me booted!

9 Stages of Weededness : Chef 2 Chef Forums
9 Stages of Weededness

Stage 1: The Clubhouse
You're not busy at all. There is nothing happening. In fact, there is so little business that the few housekeeping things (like maintaining the water in the steam tables) get neglected.

Stage 2: The Fairway
You're now getting some tickets, but there's not enough to really make you focus. This is usually at the very beginning and very end of service. Thoughts of pints and flirting with the waitress fill your mind, while the burger overcooks.

Stage 3: The Green
Now you have plenty of tickets to keep you busy, but not feel rushed. You're in the zone. Meat temps are spot on, ticket modifications are all done, life is good. You feel strong, ready for more action.

Stage 4: The Rough
Your board is beginning to fill. There are no more thoughts of the waitress. You have an increasing number of pans on your stovetop, your grill is filling. You're in the flow, slinging some serious food, working up a good lather. Nothing can stop you.

Stage 5: The Tall Grass
You now have a full board and your tickets aren't getting pulled off the printer right away any more. Your grill, stovetop and friers are all full to capacity. You are now operating at peak efficiency. You're working up a good sweat, there are no wasted motions. You're feeling a little rushed, but that's Ok because you're on top of it. But if anything goes wrong, then that's it for you and you progress to...

Stage 6: The Weeds
Now you have more orders comming in than you are putting out. There is no more physical space to handle the load. You start employing certain "tricks" to get the food out faster. The stress level is building, the expo is getting louder and tickets are now 5 deep at the printer. Ticket times are getting longer. The most important part about this whole thing is that it's a mental thing as well. You start to feel a little panic in the back of your mind. Getting into and leaving the weeds can be in a matter of minutes and you can do it on your own.

Stage 7: The Forest
You're deep now. The printer is going nonstop. You've resorted to sandbagging food. You're mind is starting to move faster than your body, usually to the detriment of the food. Things get dropped, presentations are sloppy, sauces may start to break. Things start to burn. It's at this point that you realize you need help to get through the rush. You start to loose track of the levels of mise-an-place on your station and next thing you know, you gotta run to get something out of the walkin, putting you further behind. Ticket times are consistantly exceeding acceptible limits. Without help or a sudden stop in business, you spiral deeper into...

Stage 8: The Jungle
Nothing can save you now except for a stop in orders. You feel beset on all sides. The tickets are forming a 6-7 foot trail of paper and are curling on the floor. You swear you see pygmies out of the corner of your eye shooting blowdarts at you. Food is comming back at an alarming rate because you didn't get the mods right, the wrong sides went out, the food was over/undercooked. The world is crashing all around you. This stage is ofter occumpanied by, say, an oven going down, or the dishwasher breaking, or some other global event. Rarely is a cook on the line alone in the jungle. For the mentally tough, this is the final stage. This is rock bottom. A fried calamari app can take up to 45 minutes go out (should take 5). The strange thing, though, is that an eerie calm comes over you and the world turns in slow motion, and you start to laugh. There's nothing more you can do.

Stage 9: The Kelp Forest
You're now under water, and you can't breathe. Crabs are pinching your toes and seals are dropping rocks on your head. The only difference between this step and step 8 is purely mental. To get to the Kelp Forest, you experience a total mental break such that you cease to function. You are so overwhelmed that you're found muttering to yourself in a corner, or curled up in the bathroom crying. If you reach the Kelp Forest, you should not be in this line of work. And few people, after reaching the Kelp Forest, continue on in the work.

So there you have it, the 9 Stages of Weededness. I'll admit, in my beginnings in the biz, I did get to the Jungle several times, but I haven't been beyond the Weeds in years.
How do your worst moments measure on the scale?
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #25 of 34
Awesome thread :smoking:
post #26 of 34
ssnaking: snake king - staff/staffs that alwez gone missing when the chef is not around

wayang: y-ang - staff/staffs that pretending to be doing buzy when the chef/manager doing their rounds...

KK: K-K - chef that creates havoc or panicking in the kitchen juz of 1 order only...but the chef also doesnt know wat he's doing..

Chicago Chef: Che-Car-Go chef - staff/staffs/chef that making short cut cooking,exp;when out of roux he will simply thicken any sauce by using corn starch..

Item 86': - any thing in the kitchen or menu or even staff dat gone missing or did not turn up to work or dat is out of stock (unavailable)

well these r som terms dat r used in Malaysia hotel...
post #27 of 34

Many words, one food item

Here are some food items which have different names in Spanish, depending on the country you find them:

A china in Puerto Rico is a Naranja everywhere else. In English it's an orange.
A yautia in Puerto Rico is a malanga in Cuba. Yautia/Malanga is a root similar to a potato but with a lot more fiber and a stronger flavor.
A guineo in Puerto Rico is a banana everywhere else.
A papa in Puerto Rico is a patata in Spain, and in most every other country.
Puerto Ricans refer to mangoes as mangó, while others refer to it as mángo.

I shall return with more.
Spice is
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Spice is
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post #28 of 34
here is a .pdf of general and most common terms used in the kitchen along with a wine glossary:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=OE6K0KBI
post #29 of 34
Jayme,

Although your example of bechamel is not wrong and in respect is correct i dont bleive it to be the correct way of makeing a tradtional bechamel, below i have writes a little about a tradtional bechamel

Bechamel,


A white sauce made by the combining hot flavoured or seasoned milk with a roux (the original behamel sauce which owes its name to marquis of bechamel, was prepared by adding larage quantities pf fresh cream to a thick veloute,)
one of the basic sauces, the classic recipe calls for flavoured milk by heating it with a bay leaf a slice of onion and blade of mace or some nutmeg. celery, carrot, ham and/or mushroom peeleings may even be added to this then is left for about 30 mins to infuse,

The italian balsamella

sometimes infused with garlic, bay leaf, and/or onion is now a white sauce with nutmeg ,


bechamel commonly refers to a white sauce with simple seasoning
bechamel is widley used particulary for eggs, vegtables, and gratin dishes, and for filled scallop shells, it can be used as a basis for other sauces made by adding diffrent ingredients



Bechamel sauce recipe


Gently heat 500ml of milk with 1 bay leaf, a thick slice of onion and 1 blade of mace remove from the heat just as the milk boils, cover the pan and set aside for at least 30 mins, strain the milk and discard the flavourings. melt 40g butter over a low heat in a heavy based sauce pan(dont want the butter to burn) add 40g flour and stir briskly until the mixture is smooth, without changing colour graduakky stir in the milk and bring to the boil beating well to prevent any lumps forming. season and (according to its use) add a little grated nutmeg. simmer gently for 3-5 mins, stirring from time to time



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thanks guys just thought i would throw my 2cents in
post #30 of 34
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