ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Salt - Which to Use
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Salt - Which to Use

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi Gang,

In some recipes, the cook can "salt to taste." In other recipes it seems that a certain amount of salt is required in order for the recipe to work properly. So, when a recipe of this type calls for salt, which salt do you use, kosher salt (and, if so, which one as the different kosher salts contain different amounts of sodium), table salt, sea salt, etc.?

Shel
post #2 of 19
Well,over here in the UK,I only have Maldon sea salt in my kitchen.I find standard table salt a bit harsh.When i'm in the US,I tend to use Kosher salt but I prefer Maldon,I just can't find it over there!:)

As for how much,I just keep tasting,adding in small quantities(you can add more but not take it out)as i'm sure you know!
post #3 of 19
I, too, only use Maldon salt - have done so for over 20 years.

As for the 'to taste' thingy..... well, my taste requires very little salt... but my husband invariably adds a little more (via a good salt mill - Peugeot brand) when the meal is served!

I've never used kosher salt - but then the whole kosher area of my local supermarkets are a mystery to me!
post #4 of 19
Hey Ishbel,I don't suppose you know where I can get tinned San Marzano tomatoes online in the UK?Last time I had to send off to Italy and the postage was just as much as the toms!:o
post #5 of 19
No, I'm sorry, I don't! I use Waitrose own-brand organic plum tomatoes - they are the best ones I've tried.

I'll certainly check in Valvona and Crolla when I'm next in there - you might try looking at their site - the postage from Edinburgh to Wales shouldn't be too prohibitive! They are a veritable treasure-trove of Italian foodstuffs http://www.valvonacrolla.co.uk/
post #6 of 19
Wow!That's an excellent site,it's going to cost me big time looking at all those goodies!Thanks.:bounce:
post #7 of 19
You ain't seen nuthin yet! If you like cheese - have a look at Ian Mellis' site. He now has four or five places spread around the city. I use his shop on Victoria Street

http://www.ijmellischeesemonger.com/

He also sells wonderful oatcakes to go with the cheese. Not as good as mine, of course, but not bad for a commercially made biscuit!
post #8 of 19
Oops, sorry, Shel. Didn't mean to hijack your salt thread.:)
post #9 of 19
I'm sorry as well Shel!:blush:


*Whispers to Ishbel*Have ordered 24 tins.Postage £9:eek: but still half the price of getting them from Italy.Thanks again.Unfortunately I am one of those weird people who don't like cheese.Except Parmesan.I NEED Parm on my Italian grub!
post #10 of 19
Hi :)

During cooking I usually use Kosher salt. But for topping nearly all my meals I use Fleur De Sel. I've tried a good number of different salts and for taste and texture...I do prefer Fleur De Sel.

It may be expensive when looked at the per pound price. But I don't buy it that way. It's $7.49 for a 3.5oz jar...which lasts me nearly a year. To me...that's not a bad price to pay.

take care,
dan
post #11 of 19
Kosher salt for rubs, to season before broiling steaks etc., and finer-grained sea salt for soups and in my salt shakers.

I have fleur du sel on the table to use as a seasoning.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #12 of 19
Kosher and sea salt as described above.

Locally, there's a "sea" salt brand called Real Salt. It's mined from leftovers of one of the many prehisotoric seas that covered the area. It's a bit pink in color and quite good.

Arches National Park is the result of the geologically "quick" dissolving of such a salt dome.

Morton's runs an industrial salt evaporation facility at the Great Salt Lake, but its product from that facility is not for table use.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #13 of 19
For some great insights, y'all need to read Mark Kurlansky's "Salt: A World History."

It is a history of the world as told through the search for and use of the only rock we eat.

It's worth reading the book for his commentary on fleur de sel alone---which may actually be the oldest form of manufactured salt in the world.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #14 of 19
I am not a salt expert and don't use a lot at home for health reasons. I don't like the taste of iodized salt.
Now, pro chefs don't laugh, but I have switched to the Spice Island brand of Mediterranean Sea Salt. I buy it at Sams and the nice thing about this product is that it is in a large container which has a built in grinder. This enables me to keep it coarse or grind it depending on what I'm preparing.
It's a 13.5 ox bottle with disposable grinder.
Just wanted to add.
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #15 of 19
I pick up a supply of fleur de sel when I visit France - but in the main only use Maldon. It is a really great tasting salt - even in small quantities.
post #16 of 19
I read about salt from Trapani in Corriher's Cookwise. Then i happened to find it in a whole food store around here. I had imagined another of those grey dirty-looking organic unwashed sea salt, which, i have to say, never impressed me for the taste. Instead it was white, but it was very tasty. I don;t use anything else any more. Don;t know where you can find it out of italy, though.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #17 of 19
I use kosher salt for all purpose, and grey salt and fleur del sel for finishing
post #18 of 19
Hawaiian sea salt. It is the least expensive around here, and has a nice texture.
post #19 of 19
For most recipes, basic iodized table salt works well. For meat marinades and things to put in the smoker, I use non-iodized table salt. For rubs or in some recipes (when called for) a course sea salt works well (or to sprinkle over certain appetizers).
Bon Vive' !
Reply
Bon Vive' !
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Salt - Which to Use