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Tempered Chocolate not Glossy

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
It was one of my new years resolutions this year to get truly comfortable with tempering chocolate and making decorations. I learned this in school, of coarse, but in the last five years have been focused on the savory side of the kitchen.

So I seem to be tempering right. I follow the temperatures, it hardenes, it snaps, it holds, no bloom etc... but it just isn't as shiny as the pictures make it seem. I cannot figure out where I might be going wrong. I am using Callebaut 54.5%.

One thing is I might be heating it to high in the beginning. Could this be a factor? Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks
S
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #2 of 13
Hi There!
What application are you using for your Chocolate? ie: Shelled, piping etc..
If you apply the Chocolate to a shiny surface such as acetate you will get a shiny surface in return, unless of course you are tempering incorrectly.
Hope that helped some, let me know, I am used to producing a fairly large volume of Chocolates of varying types.
Joan
1dessertdiva
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Actually I am putting it on parchment paper (waiting for acetate) but it seems that the non-contact side would be shiny anyway so it must be something I'm doing, or not. Question, if you don't mind, after spreading the tempered chocolate on the acetate, can I top with another piece so as to smooth out both sides? Sorry for the elemental questions but I am sort of out of touch with the trends and techniques. Do you have a book (professional level) that you would reccomend for refreasher?

Thanks again,
S
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #4 of 13
As 1dessertdiva says, even properly tempered chocolate will have a matte finish unless it was in contact with something that would make it shiny, like acetate, or a mold. Really. That's just the way it is.
post #5 of 13
I saw your reply to Breton Beats and I want to ask what may be a suupid question, but are chocolate tempering machine worth it (in your personal opinion) or should I just keep working on my tempering techniques? I have been thinking about buying one. I am just a home cook that takes pride in making good meals.
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #6 of 13
I'm not 1dessertdiva, so I hope you don't mind if I chime in with an answer.

Whether or not a tempering machine is a good idea for you depends on what you like to do with your tempered chocolate. The most affordable home tempering machines are the Revolation 1 and 2 from Chocovision, which run around $250-$400 depending on if they're new or from eBay. They are automated tempering machines and do all the work for you. But... they only do up to 1.5 lbs at a time. Which is probably enough if you're just doing the occasional round of dipped truffles or some chocolate decorations. If you're into molding, however, 1.5 lbs is about the minimum you need for 1 mold, so these machines quickly start to lose their efficiency gains over hand tempering.

The next step up in automated tempering machines gets very expensive - around $1300.

I've just started my own chocolate business, and I opted to get a Mol d'Art melter. I got it on eBay for around $400. It does not temper chocolate, but it melts it and holds it at a very stable temperature. All I need to do is set it to melt and walk away for a few hours. When I come back I temper using the seed method, and then the melter holds it at working temperature for me while I'm dipping and/or molding.
post #7 of 13
Hi Tammy,
Thank you for answering the questions, I have not been reading posts for awhile. I am in the process of opening a wholesale chocolate shop with a small retail outlet. Do you use the MyCryo method from Callebaut for your machine? I have found it saves a great deal of time and is very reliable.
Dirk "just a home cook" anyone who has a passion for the arts and has a consumer to enjoy it is more than just a home cook! And you should have any tools you want to help you truly enjoy your craft.
Breton, This site and the internet are great sources for chocolate information, also any of the Chocolate vendors generally provide information on tempering if asked, Chocolatier magazine is also a good source. The best way to go is to practice at every opportunity, there are many ways to temper, microwave, seeding, table tempering and mycryo. I hope I have answered everything.
Joan:lips:
post #8 of 13
Tammylc & 1dessertdiva, Thank you both for taking the time to answer me :)
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #9 of 13

reply to Breton on tempering

Hi Everyone...very new at posting on any web site...so bear with me!

Regarding your shine issue. I make bark and hav discovered 2 things.
You can get a shine if you make contact with a silicone baking pan.
I did not have success layering chocolate but let the first layer dry...I think it may have worked if if poured both warm.

Hope that is helpful,
I have a question but I guess I will post that seperately?
post #10 of 13
Dirk,
A good tempering machine will take some of the "labour" component out of your production. It is like having an apprentice who just stands there and continually stir the chocolate for you.
Having a tempering machine does not mean it will do everything for you, you should still have developed the skills to consistently and confidently handle chocolate. When "things" go wrong you cannot rely on the tempering machine to fix it.
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #11 of 13
Tammy - your chocolates look fantastic!!:)
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #12 of 13
Thanks, Felixe! I'm having fun with it.
post #13 of 13
I know of it, but have not tried it. Saving a great deal of time sounds like a big win to me! I shall have to order some and try it out!
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