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Cornbeef And Cabbage Help!!!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
SO LISTEN!,
my grandmother is one of those who dont follow recipes and if you ask her soemthing she cant give exact amounts or times SO
I asked When do you add the Potatoes and the cabbage and how long do they cook together
PLEASE HELP ME!!
post #2 of 14
They don't cook well together as they don't cook for the same length of time. Here's a page I posted on another food forum last year, it's a professional resturant forum but it's still the way I've always done my corned beef and cabbage St. Pat's dinner.

The problem I see in your plan is the dish has the possiability of easily becoming a mushy mess. Our corned beef has a large following, in fact, it went on the menu last Thursday and will stay there thru St. Pat's. Here's what we do. Simmer the corned beef with the packets of spices, water (save the beer) barely covering, until tender. I do 10-12 at a time, working one day out. I set it off the stove and let the briskets cool in the brine, adding a couple scoops of ice after a awhile to bring the temperture down so I can set in the bottom of the cooler. I think chilling in the cooking liquid is one of the most important steps.

The next day, remove the corned beef (save some broth) maybe trim the fat up a little, set on a cookie sheet. I make a glaze of a little apricot jam, brown sugar, and lots of brown mustard, lightly coat the tops and bake at 350 till the glaze takes. Let this cool down and slice, and stage.

I cook a batch small whole onions in the broth and remove; cook my carrots, remove, and then russets cuts in half length wise, baby reds or fingerlings. I lay these all in a flat pan, and chill.

I keep a low flat skillet with a 1/2 to 1 inch of broth in it; the sliced corned beef, the veggies are heated to order. As I lift out and plate with a slotted spatula, I turn up the heat and throw in a handleful of thinly sliced cabbage for a quick saute` (I add a little caraway seed) The cabbage stays nice, doesn't look limp and soggy.

We drizzle a little parsley mustard sauce* on the corned beef and serve. Add a small ramkin of the hot broth to the plate. The parsley mustard sauce is a favorite, adds a lot of contrast to the plate visualy and to the taste.

Everything is crisp and clean looking, and the sauteed cabbage looks smart on the plate. Hits the menu at $16.00 with a salad. Now, drink the beer!

*Parsley Sauce: sauteed shallots or onions, add heavy cream, lots of djion mustard, salt, pepper cooked very thick then add a couple of tablespoons of fresh parsly)

Left over corned beef? Rubens!! We had a little bit of Hot Chile Garlic Sauce to the 1000 island dressing, adds a little kick to the sandwich.
post #3 of 14
I too cook my corned beef separate from the cabbage, carrots and potatos. In a separate pot I combine some beef broth and water and add the carrots and bring to a boil, then add the potatoes and cabbage cut into (depending on cabbage size) 1/4's. The cabbage requires the least amount of cooking time and the carrots the most. Ejoy!
post #4 of 14

Here, take this recipe

Hi, as others have posted, don't cook the potatoes with the meat. However, cook the potatoes in the water after the brisket has been boiled. Here, here's the recipe:
http://www.divinecaroline.com/articl...P=KNC-DC_YSM_6

Enjoy! Happy St. Patty's Day.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank You Everyone!
Its Soaking Now
Cant Wait!!
post #6 of 14
[quote=nowIamone;159021]Our corned beef has a large following [...] Simmer the corned beef with the packets of spices, water [quote]

What spices are in the packet, and where do you get a packet?

Shel
post #7 of 14
If you buy a commercial corned beef, it will come with a SMALL packet of spices and herbs. mustard seed and such. I usually add some more of the same spices out of my cupboard.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 14
Ahh, I now recall seeing such packets with the corned beef sold in supermarkets. I suspect these aren't the same spices one would use when making a "Jewish" style corned beef, using a brisket. Is the supermarket stuff even the same cut of meat?

From poking around the web and digging through some old recipes, my sense is that neither the meat nor the spices are the same, and what one would get in a Jewisj deli when ordering a corned beef sandwich would be quite a bit different than what one would get at O'Shaunessy's on St Patrick's day.
post #9 of 14
It's the brisket. Usually separated into the point cut and the flat cut.

We're a little short of Jewish delis out here...
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 14
Amazing how different corned beef is depending where you live.
Here, corned beef brisket comes in a heavy duty plastic bag, with the seasoned liquid marinade already added.. You just open it up and plop the whole lot into your pot and go from there.
post #11 of 14
Yep, that's the stuff. There's usually a small spice packet included with those.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 14
DivineCaroline has turned out to be one of my favorite sites! Thanks for the heads up!
post #13 of 14
Have never seen anything like a spice packet with corned beef here! It'll catch on in ten years or so :)

I just add an onion studded with 10 cloves, couple bay leaves, tsp black peppercorns, couple tbsp vinegar and also brown sugar, and a carrot roughly chopped.

I don't cook the veg in with the beef - just per normal. Might try it one day, but don't they all get too salty?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #14 of 14
When I buy fresh uncooked corned beef here, it's not all that salty. Not at all too salty to cook veges in the broth. Some brands of ham, on the other hand, are made too salty for me.
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