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Crispy bits in aged cheeses  

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
In some aged cheeses there are crystalized bits, since not all aged cheeses have crunchies is there a whey (sorry :)) to create them? The technical terms are not forming this morning, hope the discription is enough.
cooking with all your senses.....
cooking with all your senses.....
post #2 of 9

No Whey

It is calcium Lactate....it naturally forms in our cow milk cheese at 3 to 4 years of age.....I like it and think that it adds character......With the aged goat cheese it comes at about 15 months and the sheep milk cheeses and mix milk cheeses at about 24 months......

Sid Cook
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
some aged cheeses seem to have more than others, would that just be luck?
cooking with all your senses.....
cooking with all your senses.....
post #4 of 9
I notice these crystalized bit particularly in aged goudas.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #5 of 9

10 yr Gouda

Like having savory toffee bits in the cheese. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.:bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
at 10 years I would expect the whole thing of aged gouda to be a crispy bit.....:)
Some of the English Cheddars...Montgomery have them in abundance.

I've got some 10 year cheddar from WI in my fridge....it's got crispies....Hooks from Mineral Point, WI....picked it up at Madison Farmer's Market. 10 year cheddar is pretty hard to find.

Some parmesans have it also.
cooking with all your senses.....
cooking with all your senses.....
post #7 of 9
This is interesting since Montgomery's does not age their cheddar more than two years. I wonder what would cause this crystallisation so early in theirs?

I've rarely tasted a good cheddar that was aged beyond 3-4 years. I think cheesemongers take advantage of the lack of regulation in cheddar ageing. They call anything past its prime "extra-old", or even lie and give it an age; I've witnessed this numerous times. I think a good 10 year old cheddar is actually a five year old with a serious bite. That said, I hope to try Sid's award winning 8 year old. I'm sure with Sid's expertise, it can be done! Too bad it's not available north of the border...

BTW: "crunchy bits" = grana. :)
post #8 of 9
No...... It is a 10 year with a serious flavor.....we run our temp around 38F and prepare for the long wait. Most of the English farmhouse cheeses are aged much warmer.....in many of them you get a more barny earthy flavor.....the higher temp promotes a different culture spectrum to flavor the cheese. These cheeses are going to have a shorter life .....and it is because of the curing temp and remember they have a native molds on the rind that is very active. You have all the surface activity and this will affect the interior of the cheese....

Sid
post #9 of 9
Sid, can you address how you control (introduce or prevent)) the microflora in your environment? Have you chosen 38'F through much trial and error? Or was it regulation? Does this lower temperature tone down the shapness you would expect of such an aged cheddar?
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