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coffee's and latte's

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am a total freak for amazing coffee and even more amazing latte's.
If anyone has any thing the would like to share about what they personaly like....I would love to here it.

one of my personal fav's
Almond joy Latte
1 cup of strong coffee
1 cup of steamed milk
half a shot of almond syrup
half a shot of coconut syrup
stir...and mmmmmmmmm
and if you don't care about fat....whipped cream to top it off
:lol: :lips:
ENJOY
Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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post #2 of 22
I like my coffee to taste like . . . coffee. :rolleyes: But that does sound pretty tasty. :lips: Much better than those (to me) horrible flavored coffees -- I gag when I smell "hazelnut."
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 22
Thank you, Suzanne.

I'm always leery about jumping in with negative coments when I'm new to a list. So refrained from talking about the trendy coffee thing. You know all of that is for people who really don't like coffee.

I spent an unfortunate week in Seattle a few years back. Didn't have a decent cup of coffee the whole time I was there.

Their idea of coffee is foamy milk with some sort of strange flavor. Phoey.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

lol

You 2 are funny.....lol :talk:
I like all kinds of coffee...flavored or not....but mostly...I like it STRONG!!
Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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post #5 of 22
I like coffee. Just coffee. Starbuck-style places just make me shudder :smiles:
post #6 of 22

Peets

I became addicted to Peets coffee while living on the west coast. Now have it delivered fresh roasted to my home weekly.

Give me a bag of Peets coffee and a french press and I'm a happy camper.
post #7 of 22
Is a French press what we in Europe call a cafetiere? ie, jug with a plunger?
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Sounds good....where can I get some????
Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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post #9 of 22
Yup, that's exactly what a French Press is! Personally, I prefer to use an old school perk, on the stove top. Makes the BEST darn coffee, EVER!
andrea
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andrea
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post #10 of 22
For a few years, my husband and I gave each other only coffee-related presents. So we ended up with
  • a stovetop espresso pot
  • a stovetop milk steamer
  • an electric espresso maker that has been in the closet for years (doesn't build up enough pressure to make a good crema on top :( )
  • a smallish ceramic Melitta drip pot (broke the cone, but I have plastic replacements)
  • a French press (long since replaced because I kept breaking the glass beaker)
  • 2 Turkish coffee pots, or is it 1 Turkish and 1 Greek? :look:
  • umpteen milk pitchers/jugs
  • a lovely Spanish coffee serving set with sleek pot, jug, sugar bowl (broke the cover :cry: ) and cups and saucers
  • umpteen sets of demitasse cups
  • a serving pot that matches my china pattern, as well as demitasses
And, oh yeah, I still have the pot of my percolator, but I threw out the innards ages ago, and melted the cover, so I just use it for drip. Also have two coffee grinders used for coffee only (a third is for spices).

The funny thing is, we only have coffee at home maybe once or twice a month. But when we do, it's good! :lol:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
That is funny Suzanne.
There is nothing like a good cup of strong dark coffee. :)
Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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post #12 of 22
ADF
Thanks for the info.
It never ceases to amaze me that terms are so different across the pond. zuchinni for courgette, egg plant for aubergine are just two examples.
post #13 of 22
Getting kind of off-topic but -- I have lists and lists of "translations" between American English and English English, and American and Australian. Words, products, cuts of meat -- it's a wonder we can understand each other at all! :lol: Ishbel, if I ever get another British or Aussie book to turn into American, can I check things with you? You know, like: where on the animal is this cut of meat? ;)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #14 of 22
I'm surprised to see that none of you coffee gourmets roasts their own beans. Absolutely weonderful results can be had with little effort. Check out www.sweetmarias.com (I think that's the address, but you can do a Google on Sweet Maria's coffee).

Shel
post #15 of 22
ryanh said: Sounds good....where can I get some????

http://www.peets.com
post #16 of 22
Well, you can certainly try me, Suzanne. But even between Australian and UK there are some weird anomolies!

All my older recipes are in imperial measurements, and the Imperial pint and the US pint are different measures, so I suspect that many of the others are too! My newer recipes are all metric. It's the US 'cup' measurements that floor me every time. It's why I don't use many US recipes, cos it does my head in to have to convert to weights from cups!
post #17 of 22
Ishbel, even American recipe terms vary depending on their age.

In older days (i.e., much of the 19th and early 20th centuries), one of the differences between American and British measurments was level v. rounded. American recipes assumed rounded tablespoons, for instance, and would specify level if that were intended. British recipes assumed level.

Somewhere along the line this changed. Modern American recipes assume level, and so no longer state it.

Most of the time this doesn't matter. It could in baking, though.

There also were differences in some of the archaic measurements. A British gil, for instance, was a quarter cup. But an American gil was a fifth cup.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #18 of 22
That's interesting about the level/heaped (as we would call it, not rounded!) spoon measurements.

Another case of two nations divided by a common language - and when you add Canada, Australia and New Zealand into the mix - it gets even more confusing!

A Scots gill was always bigger than an English gill. That's why when alcohol was measured by the gill, you could get an Englishman/woman drunk quite quickly as they were unaware of the larger spirit measure in their drink!
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thank you Mochefs :)
Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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Life is short....eat dessert first *wink*
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post #20 of 22
Hi guys and gals,

I do love my coffee :)

I've got a stovetop expresso, a Chemex Drip and a french press. I've also just begun to roast my own beans for the past two years now. But I've got soooo much to learn :)

take care,
dan
post #21 of 22
I just added a Lavazza Espresso Point single serving machine to my kit. My clients seem to be really happy with the product. I also purchased a Bunn My Café pod brewer for folk who want a traditional drip coffee.

The espresso from the Lavazza tastes great. The espresso pods are a little expensive, but now I'm not throwing airpots of coffee out every hour or 2 and I don't have to tend to a brewer. If you are looking for a home or small business espresso solution, I think its a pretty good machine..and it looks nice: www.singleservecoffee.com/archives/003004.php
post #22 of 22
I roast my own coffee, mainly as Green (unroasted beens) keep in good condition for so much longer than roasted ones,

There are a number of good roasting machines out there but the cheapest and easiest way to learn is with an old stove top popcorn machine (Whirley Pop)
, drill the lid for a probe thermometer and away you go.

Its a great way of learning about how coffee roasts what various types of roast really are, e.g. french roast/dark roast etc.

for those in the UK i'd really recommend http://www.hasbean.co.uk/ Steve is great for green and roasted coffee
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