ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Looking around for a 10" Chef knife
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking around for a 10" Chef knife

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I already have an 8" Zwilling (JA Henckels) Four-Star Chef's knife which I use for overall general every where use and I have little problem with it being shared around the kitchen.

What I'm looking for is a 10" Chef knife before my apprenticeship starts; a personal use one, one 'only' I can use at home or work. A 'Dream Knife' of sorts, one to dominate my knife collection, but I'll also get a Victorinox (I can't find a better value good-quality knife than their's) as a spare to use or lend to others.

The short list so far is as goes:
- Zwilling Professional S (31021-261)
- Wusthof Trident Classic (4582)
- Messermeister San Moritz Elite (E/2686-10)
- Thiers-Issard Sabatier ('Four-Star Elephant')

... for me the Zwilling is the 'safe' option, I've got a 6" from a model series I can't quite put a name on but it's similar to a Pro S in a narrower German blade. The Wusthof Trident seems to be the most expensive of the bunch and the Sabatier, the one that needs a bit of hunting for.

I'd prefer a knife with a riveted handle with a squarer profile, it somehow feels better, fits my hands just right and firm. The more curvy moulded style handles are quite varying, one model might fit someone else's hands perfectly but not so in mine.
I'm leaning towards more of a French blade for a Chef's knife this size since I have the 6" Zwilling for tighter jobs.
The carbon steel Sabatier kinda worries me a bit if I get a water spot or something, how to get the knife shiny again. I mean would health inspectors frown on a non-shiny knife.
I've tried a few Global knives at work including the G-2 and another large knife G-17 I think it was, while the one piece design is nice, wonderfully sharp when honed perfectly and lightweight. But the handles just don't feel right except the GS-7 which a rather unconventional shaped paring knife but it feel 'perfect' for all the jobs I've used it for (I'm trying to get one for myself). If I don't feel comfortable with the Cook's knives, so Global isn't on the cards for my 10" knife search.

Opinions welcome to help me learn and find the right knife for me. Oh and another thing is my budget range is AUD$100-300 (USD$80-240).

[I wonder whether the forum administer can move my thread to the "Cooking Equipment Reviews" section because it seems a more spot to put.?]
post #2 of 26
Seems to me you've subconsciously made your decision. You're happy with the Zwilling you own and the Pro S fits your hand. What else is there to consider?

Personally, I've never been happy with Sabatier knives. They don't sit right in my hand, and the blades are only so-so IMO. They are, far as I'm concerned, grossly overpriced.

You can't go wrong with Wusthoff, providing the hand-fit is right. It's not for everybody. Personally, I don't pay attention to money when buying tools of any kind, so to me your comment about them being the most expensive of the group isn't important.

I've never owned a Messermeister, so have no opinion about them.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #3 of 26
I would get a tojiro 270mm gyuto from http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/DP...EIGHT:%20174px shipped to you from japan for less than $90 us dollars! these are the best bang for the buck harder steel than any german knife which supports a thinner edge which gets and stays sharp better than a german knife!
post #4 of 26

knives

I have used the Wusthof Trident Classic (4582) for the last 9 years. It is a great knife. Better than Zwilling (JA Henckels). I am not a fan of Messermeister and from others experience Sabatier is either a great knife or a louzy one. I personally love my Wusthof.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Wow johnarmr, a Japanese knife that doesn't cost like 400 bucks... sweet!
I did some exploring on that website, the prices don't seem too bad. I might consider one very interesting DP Clad knife into my collection.
post #6 of 26
You know, I have pretty small hands and the Henckel "S" 10" is the only 10" blade that feels o.k. in my hand - I own one as well, as well as a couple of Japanese knives.
post #7 of 26
no problem I am on a mission to let as many people know about japanes knives as I can I cant imaginge going back to my other knives!
post #8 of 26
I had 800 dollars worth of henkels for 10 years and never did like them ,they were what everyone had at the time.Dumped them all on an apprentice about8 years ago for next to nothing. then i went out and bought a nice wusthof which i use at home. as far as work goes i have a 10 inch victorinox with rosewood handle and it is the best knife for the value. it feels great in my hand and banging out prep is a breeze. you will have to pry it out of my cold dead hand before i let it go.just go with what feels right and comfortable to you
Line Cooks are the Heros
Reply
Line Cooks are the Heros
Reply
post #9 of 26
Buy a Forchner, and call it a day. A good sharp knife for not alot of cash.
post #10 of 26

Knife

I agree with bb250. Get two Victorinox Inox chef knives and go. You can then lend one out if you want and if it walks off it's not the end of the world.
post #11 of 26
Have you looked into MAC knives at all? Super sharp and they have lines that are inexpensive.
post #12 of 26
I am in the process of purchasing a new set of knives myself. Lots of decisions, choices. I have a set of Henckel 4 stars and they will be retired to the home front. A co worker has a set of Global's and I have tried them. The best of the bunch in my opinion (for me) is the small paring knife. The rest are a bit light, and the handles seem small for me. I dunno prolly could get used to them but I like the heft and feel of either a Henckel or a Whustof in a chef's knife.

I think the notion of Henckel's being "really spensive" depends on where you buy them, afterall they are a tool. Call me "old school" oh wait dont do that...his shoes are to big for me to fill.:lol:

But I have settled into the Henckels Pro "S" series. This is the list I purchased this week all NEW FOR $187.50 (USD)

4" Paring
5.5" Boning
6" Utility
8" Chef
6" Chef

The rest of my knife kit is pretty much set ie: Santoku, birds beak, bread, slicer, filet. I think these prices are a pretty good deal for the quality of the Henckels. Especially considerinig the prices quoted at the "knife stores" and some of the internet knife sites. There is a 10" Pro "S" that could be had for $85.00 (it's new) It took a bit of comparing prices and deciding on what were my needs but the online auction was the best pricing (if you are careful and not in a hurry) Heck the 6" Utility was only $15.50 plus $6.00 shipping for a NEW Pro "S" Henckel. :smoking:

Best of luck
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
post #13 of 26

knife choices

Hi

I notice that your choices only contain European knives.

Have you considered a true Japanese knife - not a 'Gaijin' knife like Global or Shun?

The really good ones are sharper, staay sharper longer aand are faar easier to resharpen - and there are thousands available in Stainless
post #14 of 26
There are two basic kinds of work you do with a knife. Large production heavy volume rough work, or precision slicing lower volume work. You're gonna be doing production most of the time, and a good 10" heavy knife will help with going through 2 bunches of celery at once. It also comes in handy butchering. For example, you will use the heel to knock off knuckle bones, or use the back of the knife to separate ribs. You'd be amazed at how many things you can do with a good knife, punch holes in cans, open jar lids...

So if it were up to me, I'd buy a good heavy 10" knife with a bolster and deep enough blade so you don't bruise your knuckles. It will last you 20-30 years.
post #15 of 26
You'd be amazed at how many things you can do with a good knife, punch holes in cans, open jar lids...sure wish I knew how to do the quote thingy...

Yikes...:eek: that's kinda like taking the deck off the back of the house with my F-250 isn't it?? Talk about taking a "tool" to a different level. Then again I am not Flay... :D
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
post #16 of 26
Hah good thing SOMEONE got the joke! ;)

Just hit that quote button at the bottom right of your post.
post #17 of 26
Thanks for the advice on the quotes... :bounce:
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
Reply
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sorry about the late reply, came back from my first holiday in two years and didn't realised there were more replies for my thread....

Well most of my experience is with European style knives so I'm used to them but Japanese knives lose my confidence with their usually too narrow handles and 'weird' balance (difficult to proper judge balance because of their lightweightness). More often than not it's those two comfort issue that shy me of Japanese knives.

Yet I loved to have a Japanese knife from what I've experienced like wonderful alloys (stays bloody sharp), thin blade, lightweight and I find food tends to stick less.
I'm lucky my Dad have a nice handful of Japanese knives (no 'showy' Global in sight) which I'm not exactly sure what brand they are but a little Googling. The indentation on the blade matches that of Masamoto's Yanagi and Deba knives which I very rarely use because they're so specialised for their task and the one I use the most of his Japanese knives is a Gyuto-type knife with a wooden handle but the markings are more or less faded on the double bevel but Japanese grind style blade.
Well for that Gyuto knife while sharp, thin blade, stick-less and good but has a narrow handle which is strange because the smaller 6" Henckels Twin Gourmet has a similar width handle but it feels more comfortable to hold. Sadly the Gyuto profile of the edge doesn't suit my cutting style, so that explains why I prefer the French bladed knives.

So more research to be done.

Any ideas on a 10" Cook's knife with:
- Japanese blade (stay-sharp alloys and cladding, thin blade)
... but with a...
- French cook's knife profile for the blade (top slopes down gently from midway out and edge tapers up slightly then quite alot at the tip)
... with a...
- European handle (pronounced 'pinky-knotch' at the end of the lower side of the handle and 'bulged' center of the handle)
post #19 of 26
I am a female cook with fairly small hands, but strong. Lost all my tools in a ship sinking in December, so had to replace them. Been Wusthof for so long but they have lightened them up. Missed the weight--who has it--any way, picked up the 10" Shun and OMG was made for my hand and arm. Been test driving it at home, Wow!
Got a Wustof slicer, boning, and paring.
Shun also has left and right handed, am left handed, but the right handed one seemed more comfortable?
post #20 of 26
The entire line on the linked web page is extraordinary at twice their listed prices. I've been a very fickle knife buyer for years, dealing with carpal tunnel long before C.T. had a name. While I enjoy my Globals and others, I love these Japanese blades from www.japanesechefsknife.com/
post #21 of 26
I have a very large colection of wustoff and I couldn't be happier.expensive but a knife for life.You have already gotten good advice from the forum but what I want to address is others taking Your work tool.bull turkey.anyone touching my knife only did it once.hope i'm not getting out of hand but your not there to suplly knives.I have a 10" wustoff with a broken tip.course no one owned up to it. excuse the banter i'm having a senior moment...lol...good cookin...cookie
post #22 of 26

help to find gyuto style

I couldn't find the style you specified on the website. Can you help me find it?

Thanks!
Debbie
post #23 of 26
Debbie, it's identified as F-810 for $74.70 Link



These are magnificent knives for the money.
post #24 of 26

Thanks!

I appreciate your help. This looks to be a beautiful knife.

Debbie
post #25 of 26
The knife that's become one of my all time favorites is the 165mm Nakikri F-502.

post #26 of 26
I forgot to add in the last post that the F-502 is only $45.00.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Looking around for a 10" Chef knife