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Rolling out Pate Sucree

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi :talk: ,
My chef said that there is a French term used when rolling out Pate Sucree when you first take it out of the refrigerator. It's the term used when you intially push the dough down with your rolling pin until it becomes soft enough and flat enough to roll. Does anybody know what it is :confused: ? I can't just ask her because this is for extra credit. I've looked everywhere on the internet and can't find it anywhere.
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Has he ever heard a word I've said?
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I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
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post #2 of 14
he may be referring to fraisage.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
No, she said it begins with a 't'. Last week we were making Pate Sucree for the first time and when we took our dough out of the walk in, she upwrapped it and began flattening the dough with her rolling pin, rotating it. She said that it was a French term and that it began with a 't'. I've been searching everywhere for it and can't find anything remotely close :o .
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
post #4 of 14
Well, the closes thing off the top of my head is tourage, but this has to do with pate feuilletee
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Okay, thanks. Actually a friend of mine had said that she may be refering to that but wasn't sure. Thanks :D .
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
post #6 of 14
Hee hee.....
for fun, I decided to use my Translation Widget thingy, and I entered in the word "smash" (since that's sort of what you're doing with the rolling pin), and
the French translation for that was "panne totale". I kinda like that one.:lol:

By the way, here's the definition for "tourage":
tourage
[too-RAHJ]
A French term for the technique of making PUFF PASTRY whereby the dough is repeatedly folded into thirds, rolled out and folded into thirds again. This process creates hundreds of flaky pastry layers.

I don't think that's the term you're looking for.

Actually I think the answer you're looking for is "Trick" as in "Trick question".

Actually a good english word to describe that action that starts with a "t" is "tenderize". The French
translation is "attendrissez".
post #7 of 14
Hi, did she maybe mean 'petrisser?' which means to massage or work the dough or did she say maybe 'applatisser' which means to push down... I am not a translator, sorry, but speak french.. just looked in my 'french tartes' recipe book and that pretty much all that they do.
post #8 of 14
My sister inlaw is a French/English translator for the province of Quebec, Canada.
She thinks the word you want is "taper".
Hope that's it.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Well, I got 1/2 credit for tourage :lol: . The correct term was toutove :D .
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
post #10 of 14
I would have never guessed, and I still don't know how the term would be used in practice. Is it a critical stage?
post #11 of 14

I would love to know the source of your teacher's knowledge....

I was intrigued when I first saw this post as culinary terms and lingo are a special interest for me ( I also studied linguistics before cooking).

The first thing I did was contact the man who was the pastry chef at the restaurant I worked in in France. He had never heard of a term, neither had the head chef. (They did both say that often American students come to France using these terms that are never used in a real French kitchen or haven't been used since Careme.)

Now that you have posted the term I am even more complexed. Above mentioned guys didn't know the term, and my husband (a french native with a MA in linguistics) has never heard of the word either in the term that you posted or in what we assume would be the raw verb form toutover.

None of my Robert dictionaries (generaliste, cultural, synonymes & nuances) list a word that is even similar).

So I am thinking that: a.) it is spelled wrong b.) it is new slang c.) it is from a french-melange language like Canada, or Africa, or Swiss etc... or d.) once upon a time your teacher recieved some wrong information and it stuck.

So please satisfy my curiosity.

Besides all of that I am still wondering why you would want to soften P.S. in the first place. You take it out, you roll it, I am always trying to keep it as cold as possible and forget pushing it around that leads to glutten development which makes me sad.

My technique (and as far as I experienced the French technique - if it is too hard to roll - go do something else for 15 minutes.

Good luck with your studies.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #12 of 14
Everything Breton said and more. I have a friend who speaks French natively and is a chef and has never heard of that term. Tell your instructor there are some pros (both French and non-French) who are somewhat perplexed and would like a better explanation!:lol:

The only time I've pounded on pate sucree with a rolling pin is when it's been too thick to run through the sheeter and I had to get it a little flatter to get it to roll through........:roll:
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'd never heard of it either. Can't find anything about it on the internet, either :talk: . She said it was used when you got the dough out of the freezer, unwrapped it, and then using your rolling pin you tried to flatten it into a more workable disc but pushing on it and turning it a quarter turn each time you did. I'm very perplexed :roll: . The one girl who got it right had asked another chef at the school and he said that when he asked the chef who knew what it was, she had told him it was toutove, and he had never heard of it, either. Hmmmm....
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
I often wonder what he's feeling.
Has he ever heard a word I've said?
Look at him now in the mirror dreaming
What is happening in his head?
Reply
post #14 of 14
Not to beat a dead horse, but as a culinary educator, and a chef of almost 28 years I have never heard of this term.and I teach classic French technique?
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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