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How long can you keep hollandaise?

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
I was thinking of eggs benedict for the Xmas breakfast but because of other things I'll have going on, there's no way I can make it right then.

How can you extend the stove life of hollandaise, make it a couple of hours earlier and still have it be in good shape when used? Or am I just tilting at windmills here? Please advise.
post #2 of 39
Live to cook,

Hollandaise is a four hour sauce. You should throw it out and start over after that. Remember that it is a egg base product. You should not mess with egg base products. I know that it is a pain in the butt, but safty first.

When you make it keep it on the stove while you cook, but not too hot.

D. Lee

[This message has been edited by Dlee (edited 12-23-2000).]
post #3 of 39
Thread Starter 
Dlee, do you just keep it on low? Put it in a warmer?

The four hour thing, is that a bacteria/safety thing, or is it that the sauce will separate/curdle?
post #4 of 39
Live to cook,

Just keep it on the stove away from any direct heat. Or keep it in any warm place. No direct heat.

The four hour thing is a bacteria/safty thing.

D. Lee
post #5 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks again D. Lee.
post #6 of 39
technically speaking, or perhaps based on a food law thingy, in Aus, any sauce kept over 4 hrs has to be brought to the boil at least x amount of minutes. Like this is possible.

Im sure, bacterially speaking, this rule will extend to many parts of the world.
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post #7 of 39
How about keeping it in the fridge and warming it when you're ready to use it.
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post #8 of 39
I've heard that if you put it in the refrigerator it turns into a hard lump of lemon butter that separates and curdles on reheating. If I needed it in two hours and had time to make it now, I would definitely try the insulated food jar method. Where I used to work they would put the pan in a "warm" place on top of one of the ovens, where sometimes it would cook and break, and other times it would chill and crystallize, depending on whether the oven was in use.
post #9 of 39
live_to_cook, Yes there are many "modern" ways to make hollandaise sauce. It is my recomodation that the best way is the classic way. As dlee said just keep it in a warm place (internail temputure should not exceed 110 degrees) As nick shu pointed out ,which is true here as that a sauce that has been sitting for four hours must be brought to a boil...165 degrees for fifteen minutes. This is of course impossible with hollandaise. You can not boil it,and you can not hold it above 140 degrees (HAACP)you can hold this sauce safely for four hours,But understand there are two reason this sauce is not being made by Chefs like it used to
#1 People are just eating lighter preparations of food. Hollandaise and the like are artery killers.
#2 It is a breeding ground for many food born pathogens...foods must be keep below 45 degrees or above 140 degrees,this sauce misses the boat on both ends.
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post #10 of 39
To keep a holandaise in the fridge .... never heard that before. The thing with hollandaise is that it is a very temperamental sauce. What I mean is it breaks in a heart beat too cold or too warm.

Live to cook,

One way I can recomend is to, seperate your egg yolks, and keep them in the fridge. Then you can keep your butter warm till you need it. Then when you are ready to serve, fifteen minutes before service you go ahead and make your sauce.

D.Lee

[This message has been edited by Dlee (edited 12-24-2000).]
post #11 of 39
Dlee


I've kept hollandaise in the fridge and never had problem with it. It tasted very good and no curdle.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #12 of 39
It is ok to keep your eggs in the fridge.
But it is important to let them temper before you start,Or you will not incorporate enough air or butter and it is more apt to break
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[This message has been edited by cape chef (edited 12-24-2000).]
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post #13 of 39
Sisi,

How do you reheat it? Also how long would/did you keep it in the fridge?

Thank you,
D.Lee
post #14 of 39
Thread Starter 
I found that making it an hour ahead and keeping it in a warm place was enough for me. But I'm curious about the fridge idea too.
post #15 of 39
I kept it in the fridge for at least 48 hours. To reheat it I used a bain-marie. I didn't want it really hot, but just room temperature.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #16 of 39
From The Inquisitive Cook:


Don't try to store hollandaise, as it's the ideal medium for bacterial growth. And because oil and water expand at different rates, extremes in temperature also cause hollandaise to separate. Refrigeration doesn't work. The butter solidifies and separates. And reheating causes curdling, Once you've made hollandaise sauce, serve it as quickly as possible. Or keep it warm in a scrupulously clean wide-neck thermos while you do the last-minute meal preparations.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #17 of 39
I seem to remember Julia Child talking about freezing hollandaise. In general I always made it for service and then threw what ever was left over out. I used to re-use beurre blanc sauces a lot though.
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post #18 of 39
It is hard to just make one serving of Hollandaise sauce. I quickly put the left over in a zip lock and put it in the fridge. The lemon juice ( I use tarragon vinegar in mine instead of the lemon juice) is acidic enough to keep it safe over night in the fridge. The next day I warmed it up in the zip lock, and heated it in hot water from the faucet! It turned out very well!
post #19 of 39

Sadly, being an egg product, it's best kept a temperature right smack in the middle of what the health code calls the "danger zone."  Not safe to keep for long periods of time.  I also do not recommend you order it in a restaurant either. 

post #20 of 39

you can always try the blender version of the classic hollandaise. It takes about 30 min to prepare and it is really yummy. I have been making it for years!!

post #21 of 39
This thread's been dead for awhile. But now that it's revived...

The longest best results I've had trying to hold Hollandaise have been in a thermos.

As Cape Chef said more than 11 years ago, it's not safe to keep very long; a few hours at most.

Blender Hollandaise takes maybe 3 minutes, if you use a microwave to melt the butter. Five, if you melt it slowly on the stove top. What are you doing to make it take 30?

If you make too much Hollandaise, just throw out the excess. It will cost you an egg and a half stick of butter tops. Reheating Hollandaise isn't worth the trouble or the danger.

BDL





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Edited by boar_d_laze - 5/27/12 at 8:42am
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post #22 of 39

I've actually begun to hold my hollandaise and beurre blancs in insulated coffee carafes.  I've held a BB for 6 hours like this without it breaking before, I was amazed.

post #23 of 39

I will make the sauce in as small a batch as possible using 1 or 2 egg yolks depending on meal being prepared.  I'm thinking any left over sauce will immediately be put in refrigerator and try different ways to revive it.  On failure, I think freezing it in ice cubes and then putting this mostly butter mixture into my pancake batter would be a very good way to use it up without wasting a thing?

 

Of interest to me, is I perceive this sauce is a variation on any emulsification and Mayonnaise has been a bane to my existence.  I can make it but only by hit and miss.  The highest reliability comes from using a whole egg to start with and using a stick stirrer in the container that comes with the stirrer.  Oddly, it seems the shape of the container is my biggest variable.  I never have been able to make Mayo in my blender.  The initial emulsion never forms and I have soup from start to finish.

 

I'm going to give the blender recipe a go knowing that it can be used in pancakes on any failure.  If it works the first time, I might try using whole eggs after that.  While we are talking slim degrees here, it just strikes me as "healthier."

 

To the webmaster--why offer signing in using Facebook and then you have to register anyway?  Does this make no sense at all or what am I missing?

post #24 of 39

It should get dumped after the service, only estimate and make what you need.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #25 of 39

Chef EdB--when cooking at home, why should any good safe food be thrown out when it can be used?  Note the elements of the "givens":

 

1.  Its good food

2.  Being only 30 minutes or so since made, it is safe.

 

Specifically:  why do you recommend throwing good safe food out?

 

The concern has been raised about bacteria count.  Thats not an issue on a 30-60 minute time frame.

 

I ask for the epistemological elements more than the food safety issues which I take unless corrected as non-existent.
 

post #26 of 39

You can buy and it cringes me that I know this - pre made hollandaise in a Tetra Pack - about 1ltr from memory made by a brand called Knorr - it's readily available in Aus but not sure if you can get it in your area 

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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post #27 of 39

You want to chance it? be my guest, you are not feeding hundreds of people. You should not leave 1/3 cooked egg yolks out for any length of time. Yoe are setting up ideal breeding place for salmonella and every other bacterial problem To me its  just not worth the risk..,and would I throw out  yes I would. Knorr the already made mix is not a chefs hollandaise its a chemist hollandaise and can be used over if need be. The small amount of yolk used in it if any is probably pasteurized.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #28 of 39

I always tell people to use my method.  Add a little water to the yolks before you start.  When the water evaporates the yolks are cooked because it's high enough temp.  I got a youtube video somewhere showing how this is done.

post #29 of 39

Chefedb--thank you, but you only make my point.  You are taking a "reasonable restraint"/caution on the subject and turning it into an unreasonable one.  AND I am at home, not in a commercial setting.  If you want to be totally safe from food poisoning, you would stop eating at all wouldn't you?  Throw out potato salad after 15 minutes? (recall I said refrigerate after 30 min when the guideline is FOUR HOURS).  I make Egg Nog and ice cream using raw eggs.  I eat butter that is on the counter for 2-3 weeks until consumed.  I scrape green mold off blue cheese and eat it with relish.

 

Life is filled with threats, as well as things that are not threats at all.  Its good to mind the difference.

 

I have been a "Home Chef" for about 10 years now.  Started by wanting to bake my own bread and now I'm doing about everything from as scratch as I can get.  No over riding political position--just my hobby.  Its a constant education what food is.  on this very subject, I decided to forgo Hollandaise sauce.  Its taking eggs and simply covering them in butter.  GAG!  It may taste good, but its a waste of caloric input.  I made a light cheese sauce instead--only half or 3/4th the calories?  (ha, ha!).  Still fattening, but so very good.  I know I will do a Hollandaise in the near future just to see if I can do it but like the time to let eggs sit out at room temp:  moderation in all things.

 

I do like a sauce on EVERYTHING.  Maybe some other kind of sauce will do including the store bought fake ones.  Doesn't matter if it doesn't taste like "real" Hollandaise, rather my interest is does it add interest/taste/variety to the meal?  >>>> and I'm thinking portion control might really help here as well.  Use less of the Hollandiase that I would have when younger.  As a single person, that means learning how to make single yolk portions of the sauce.  I think this because I enjoy my home made from scratch mayonnaise so much and its about the same thing calorie wise.

 

The tradeoffs we must make!!

post #30 of 39

Bobbo  WHAT IS YOUR POINT?  You are comparing apples and oranges.

 

Now you are comparing potato salad to Hollandaise . First one is highly acedic one is not, one is also  tepid and handled that way... Over the years they have found mayonaise to act like a preservative because of the acids and preservatives found in it.  When we put potato salads out, it is  on the buffet in long acrylic ice pans, as is every other potentially dangerous salad.is displayed.. Egg nog is served cold Hollandaise is not made and served cold. We are not talking naturally controlled fermentation or cheese mold either. We are talking danger temps.. Get all your food facts straight first.. Health Departments in many locals also mandate Hollandaise be discarded after service. . Also our customers don't want sauces that taste like Hollandaise, they are paying for and expect real Hollandaise, Bernaise and every other scratch sauce. You can run your house kitchen any way you would like, commercial food service is a different world. subject to differnt regulations and handling procedures. Is your home subject to CITY, STATE OR COUNTY  HEALTH LAWS? I THINK NOT.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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