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How long can you keep hollandaise? - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Hey Chef--my point is there is nothing wrong at all in saving excess home made Hollandiase if it is refrigerated  and frozen soon enough.  You disagreed without giving reasons until prompted.  So--kudo's to you for having reasons.  Its the basis for any conversation.  To your other errors:

 

Now you are comparing potato salad to Hollandaise . First one is highly acedic one is not, one is also  tepid and handled that way... Over the years they have found mayonaise to act like a preservative because of the acids and preservatives found in it.  When we put potato salads out, it is  on the buffet in long acrylic ice pans, as is every other potentially dangerous salad.is displayed.. ///  Who is this "we" you are referring to?  My comments were all in the context of HOME COOKING.  Commercial operators have a whole different set of challenges that are of interest but mostly inapplicable to a HOME Chef.  Remember Julia Child dropping the turkey on the floor?  I also stated I cook from scratch so the mayonnaise I put on potato salad is preservative free and has raw egg to boot.  I thought the relevant context was food with a short shelf life if "shelf" itself was even applicable.  Safe holding times?

 

Egg nog is served cold Hollandaise is not made and served cold. ///  Again, as I stated, my egg nog uses raw egg with the attendant warnings all understood:  salamelana risk of millions to one is acceptable to me.  Others may want greater protection.

 

We are not talking naturally controlled fermentation or cheese mold either. ///  naturally controlled means the same thing as the vagaries of nature right?--ie, hit or miss what grows on cheese.

 

We are talking danger temps.. ///  OK--danger temps only. 

 

Get all your food facts straight first.. ///  I'll give that a pass.

 

Health Departments in many locals also mandate Hollandaise be discarded after service. . ///  If you want to limit the dangers of food prep and service to temps, I will insist that my comments were expressly and obviously directed at the HOME environment. 

 

Also our customers don't want sauces that taste like Hollandaise, they are paying for and expect real Hollandaise, ///  I have not yet charged my family members but that is a good idea.

 

Bernaise and every other scratch sauce. You can run your house kitchen any way you would like, commercial food service is a different world. //// Exactly right, so why do you contaminate the discussion by bringing these mostly irrelevant issues up?

 

subject to differnt regulations and handling procedures. Is your home subject to CITY, STATE OR COUNTY  HEALTH LAWS? I THINK NOT.  ///  Exactly.... so stop it.

 

So----CHEF===all the above as context, do you spot anything wrong with refrigerating excess Hollandaise sauce after 30 minutes and thereafter for 2-3 days if the excess cannot be used up to go ahead and freeze it into ice cubes and thereafter use the mostly butter mixture in your waffles and pancakes?  I think it is a most excellent idea but I'm open to learning.  I use the same ice cube approach to my failed mayonnaise attempts when I don't want to try to start over again using the failed soup as my oil source.  I usually have to do that 2-3 times per episode.  I also find that my home made mayo lasts in the refrigerator for weeks--not the days usually stated by the experts, and I don't use enough vinegar to say its the acid that is acting as a preservative.  Cool room temps and not leaving the mayo out when not being used leads to longer shelf life I believe.  Once made though, I do try to use it up as fast as possible.

 

I hope you do find some correction/CONTEXT in the above, some humor and good natured ribbing as well?

 

In disagreement, Respectfully submitted nonetheless.

post #32 of 39

Nothing, if you like it. I don't and I won't, at work or at home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbo View Post

...So----CHEF===all the above as context, do you spot anything wrong with refrigerating excess Hollandaise sauce after 30 minutes and thereafter for 2-3 days if the excess cannot be used up to go ahead and freeze it into ice cubes and thereafter use the mostly butter mixture in your waffles and pancakes?

A. It is not "mostly butter", and

B. The taste profile, for me, doesn't blend with pancakes and waffles, and

C. I do not like the texture of deflated hollandaise.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #33 of 39

Hollandaise with pancakes and waffle? eek.gif

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Hollandaise with pancakes and waffle? eek.gif

Hey man don't knock it 'til you've tried it.  :D

post #35 of 39

A. It is not "mostly butter", and /// The one recipe I looked at had 3 yolks to a stick and a half of butter, a teaspoon of lemon juice.  How is that not mostly butter?  By volume, weight, and taste my impression is hollandaise is just fancy butter. Although taste wise I have to say that mayonnaise is not fancy oil.  In this application though we aren't using hollandaise in pancake batter, we are using deflated or failed hollandaise, potentially a different animal?  What definition are you using for mostly?

B. The taste profile, for me, doesn't blend with pancakes and waffles, and ///  As stated with wisdom above---how do you know until you tried it?  Also, as a scratch cook, I make my own custom pancake and waffle batter using a majority of buckwhea and corn meal that has a heavy taste profile itself allowing lots of left overs to be added to it without notice==usually going to the "lightness"/crumb/texture of the pancake or waffle rather than its taste.  That recipe just before cooking has oil and egg added to it so the only thing off profile is a slight bit of lemon juice.  Usually that is called a complexity of flavor or a brightening.  I am actually looking forward to giving it a try.  I enjoy variety on a theme.  I also often use waffles as a type of "instant bread" to make sandwiches with.

C. I do not like the texture of deflated hollandaise.////  I assume that is why people don't use it on eggs and why one ice cubes worth in a 3/4th cup of pancake batter will I'm guessing completely mask it.  What would deflated hollandaise be except egg, butter, and lemon juice?  As stated--just what pancake batter is already.  As is so often the case in my kitchen wanderings, the issue is trying to find what I like and why but along the way, I try not to waste food.  I will eat second best recipes if it gets rid of a food item that would otherwise be thrown out.  I find it a reality check on my raw desire to experiment.  Did I mention this default solution to use up bad food experiments TOTALLY WORKS for deflated mayonnaise?  Can't even tell its in there.

 

Fun huh?

post #36 of 39

Dupe.

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Live_to_cook View Post

I was thinking of eggs benedict for the Xmas breakfast but because of other things I'll have going on, there's no way I can make it right then.


How can you extend the stove life of hollandaise, make it a couple of hours earlier and still have it be in good shape when used? Or am I just tilting at windmills here? Please advise.
post #38 of 39
You can add 25 % bechamel sauce to hold for service.this will help keep it from breaking. Also when heating yolks over double boiler it acts as a pasteurization process. Still it is a touchy subject. I wouldn't feed hollandaise to anyone with a weak or growing immune system. Such as children and senior citizen..
post #39 of 39

If your hollanaise sause brakes, put an ice cube in on a low heat and whisk lightly.

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