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Truffle Flour?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Looking for personal experiences with applications of this ingredient....
post #2 of 16
HAHAHA reads like a personal ad CChiu.
I have not used it but heard that it is wonderful....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
shroomgirl, my style must be changing... he he... didn't even realize! :p
post #4 of 16
cchiu & shroomgirl,

A few ways that I have used it is in sauces, rissoto, and mash potato.

Truffle mash potato. When I am making my mash pot. I make it as usual, garlic, butter, heavy cream, s/p, and also truffle powder. I will also fold in a bit of truffle pieces for garnish.

Make it as you normally would, at the end of cooking dust with truffle powder.

Sauces. Cracked black pepper with truffles and asiago cream sauce. Start with an alfredo, then fold in cracked blk pepper, asiago, and then truffle powder. Again, truffle pieces for garnish. Use this for pasta etc...

Another sauce. Cchiu, you onced asked what can you do with demi glace. How about seared filet mignon with a truffle essence. After you heat your glace, take a little glace and whisk in a little truffle powder, then fold it back into your glace.

The important thing about truffle powder is; when you are using it, use it with caution. If you use too much you will taste the filler ingredents. The taste is a bit chemically if you use too much. Also, the flavor will get stronger the longer you cooked product sits.

A product to compare Truffle powder with is Truffle oil. Although truffle oil has no chem taste if used too much.

On that note, I do like both products and although they are not the real thing, they dont cost as much as the real deal. The two products are for two diffrent uses, in my personal opinion.

D.Lee

[ June 30, 2001: Message edited by: Dlee ]
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Dlee,

Exactly what are the differences to be aware of when using the truffle powder vs truffle oil in cooking applications?
post #6 of 16
cchiu,

Truffle oil is not a good product in a glace, because after you incorporate it, if you do not use it right away the oil might seprate from the glace. Looking like you did not skim your reduction.

Also, this could apply to a roux base sauce. T. oil added might not properly incorporated into your alfredo, making your sauce look like you did not cook your roux long enough.

To remedy this, I would suggest using T. powder. Temper the Powder into your sauces, this is to ensure that you get out all the lumps.

T.oil I like to use in rissoto, drizzled over my mushroom, chive,and asiago omelette, and also mash pot.

D.Lee

[ June 30, 2001: Message edited by: Dlee ]
post #7 of 16
Thanks, I wondered whether coating a piece of meat (or possibly veg) for saute with flour and truffle flour would be doable....think the higher heat would give it an off taste?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 16
You might want to check "The French Laundry". If you don't have a copy, I will take a look tonight!

K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #9 of 16
Well forget that, Cchiu, it's not in The French Laundry. I also checked Kamman and Trotter's Kitchen Sessions, to no avail.

I know truffle flour can be used in a creamy sauce for pasta or to mix in foccacia dough.

At US/$26 for 25 gr you may be compelled to use it sparingly.

:)

I just found this website...may be useful!

Truffle Flour

[ July 04, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #10 of 16
shroomgirl,

As to using T. powder for a coating to saute. I would mix the Truffle powder with A.P. flour then dust the product. The thing about truffle powder is that it is very strong so I would suggest you use it very sparingly.

Also I would use it rather in the sauce for the chicken instead of dusting the chicken. You would use a lot less. I would do a chicken jus, then lia. it and whisk in the truffle powder.

Do I think that sauting with it would give an off flavor? I think that the flavor would get too intense and you might pick up that chem. flavor.

D.Lee
post #11 of 16
Yep, just as I suspected.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Kinds of truffle powder?

Is there a specific "type" or "brand" that you have personally used and prefer?
post #13 of 16

Flour or powder?

Just saw this thread for the first time. It seems to me that people are talking about two distinctly different products. "Truffle Flour" is more specific than as one way to refer to two different things. Truffle flour, which is wheat flour that has been "aromatized" by truffles -- sort of the way rice or eggs pick up the scent of the truffles when you store them together; and truffle powder, which would be pure truffle, dried and ground to a powder. But I don't know if such a product exists (haven't checked out the link supplied by Kimmie) -- I don't think truffles would dry very well if at all without losing their perfume.

Urbani has white truffle flour, white and black oils, fresh and frozen truffles, and whole and truffles pieces in jars, all available by mail. There may be other sources, but they're the one I know and trust. When you go to their site, they have a link to a number of articles about truffle flour (I remember reading the one in the NY Times).

D'Artagnan only has white and black truffle oils, and truffle butter.

I've used oil from both purveyors: white from Urbani, black from D'Artagnan. Sometimes the D'Artagnan oil can vary in strength. Never used any other of the truffle products from either, but I have used various dried mushrooms from Urbani. As I said, I trust them.

What are you thinking of making? and May I have some when you're done? :lips: ;) ;)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #14 of 16
A chef that I was working for recieved tw jars of truffle flour from a friend that visited Italy. We tried it in a lot of differnet applications like breads, pastas and roux. we found it to be too delicate for almost anything. Using truffle butter or truffle oils almost always produced a petter resault when using anything other than a truffle itself.
I can only hope that you are not really what you eat.
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I can only hope that you are not really what you eat.
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post #15 of 16
chefrum,

I have used truffles, truffle powder, truffle oil, .... I have found that each product has a different application. Truffle powder, I would suggest that it be used as a finishing product. But be careful not to use too much as you will get a chemical taste.

D.Lee
post #16 of 16
I use truffle flour and rice flour mixed in gravy especially turkey it adds a sweet nice light flavor with the headiness of the truffles
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