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hopefully not repetitive

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have a couple of questions about rice and was unable to find a thread to answer them.
I was wondering about Basmati and Jasmine rice, I've seen the packages in the stores, seen them on menus, but I've got no idea what type of rice they are or if they are just a basic white rice with a fancy name. If someone could let me know, it would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jeff
post #2 of 11
NO WAY!!! They are wonderful esoteric rices...nice flavors and very different, they are also prepared differently than "normal converted white rice".....
If you want an interesting experience, do a rice tasting, make basmati, jasmine, long grain, short grain, etc and taste them side by side.....trully a revelation.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 11
Basmati rice is an Indian, long grain rice that is sometimes aged in saffron or jasmine. Elephant brand, sold by Indian grocers,is reputedly the best brand of Basmati rice. I buy it exclusively. It is served "dry" in the traditional Indian way and not "sticky" like Asian style rice. :D

[ April 13, 2001: Message edited by: kokopuffs ]

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 11
I love jasmine rice...haven't cooked much basmati but I do have some in the pantry to try. Jasmine is so flavorful - love it.
post #5 of 11
[ April 13, 2001: Message edited by: SeattleDeb ]
post #6 of 11
im not really sure of basmati rice, however, with jasmine rice, i have actually seen it growing and it is a sub species of rice - real jasmine rice growing will give off a absolutely wonderful jasmine scent, somewhat like jasmine rice in the package.

Dont ask me why, i dont know, but it is a scent worth experiencing.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #7 of 11
You will find a gold mine of info in the following book:

Seductions of Rice
by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid

Go at www.bn.com

You will not only find book review but table of contents and recipes.

:p

[ April 14, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]

[ April 14, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #8 of 11
Hey CoolJ,

Did you know the authors are Canadian?
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #9 of 11
Yeah I agree! I was "seduced" by "Seductions of Rice" A good info book on different rices and rice preparations. Have yet to try Jasmine rice, but looking forward to it! Basmati is great tasting!
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
post #10 of 11
coolJ,

The many varieties of rice are very different.

Here are some sources for you to learn more about their attributes....

Rice Guide

Rice Glossary

Global Grains

Grain of the Ancients

Rice

More sources to learn about rice
;)

[ April 16, 2001: Message edited by: cchiu ]
post #11 of 11
Jeff, they are both long grained rice with distinct scent and flavor.

The basmati is warm and slightly nutty flavored. This is traditional for Indian food. You can use for pilaf or plain. The grains come out nice and separate. Very elegant.

Jasmine rice has a floral perfumed scent. It is used, steamed, in Thai cooking and complements Thai curry, but I use it for all kinds of dishes. You can also make coconut rice with it.

I use both these rices for any kind of food, but especially with fish. Try them, they are both great.
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