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drawn butter vs. clarified butter? - Page 2

post #31 of 35

Drawn butter is different from clarified butter in that instead of being pure milk fat, which is clarified butter, drawn butter is a hot emulsion of the whey proteins and milk fat, like a beurre monte. The emulsion is stabilized by the liason of flour.

1/3 cup butter
11/2 cups hot water
3 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Melt one-half the butter, add flour with seasonings, and pour on gradually hot water. Boil five minutes, and add remaining butter in small pieces.  

post #32 of 35

I like the idea of the butter and its watery content being beaten together to make an emulsion as what differentiates drawn butter from clarified butter. 

 

However, i suspect the term ORIGINALLY meant clarified. 

The reason is the word "drawn"

 

Drawing, as far as i can understand, has many meanings, (making a picture, pulling something, like a drawer or clothing - "drawers" meaning pants-  and pouring for instance to draw some water).  I don't know a meaning of "draw" that could imply beating or combining or emulsifying (you who have the complete Oxford English Dictionary might be able to find this)

 

Now the process of clarifying butter is one where you draw off the melted fat and leave the solids behind.  So my guess (based on logic and not on how these terms are used today in restaurants) is that "drawn butter" is only another term for clarified butter, and probably an older term. 

 

But if i were having lobster, I would definitely prefer the emulsified butter, which would have some more substance to it, be thicker, and more likely to coat the lobster more nicely. 
 

As for Wikipedia: it's just a bunch of people writing in to a site, and is FULL of inaccuracies and mistakes.  Not the place to go to resolve a dispute.  It IS a dispute. 

 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #33 of 35

Since we're on the subject of clarified butter, I used to make clarified butter from left over hollandaise sauce. good for sauteing seafoods. crazy.gif

post #34 of 35

This can be done and I have seen it done. However you could be looking for trouble in contamination as yolks of egg has come in contact with the butter and sat at tepid temps for a while.Ifeel it is not worth the risk.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #35 of 35

Since I have a milk Allergy it is very important that the solids are not in the clarified butter.

 

Every recipe I have seen for clarified butter removes the solids from the butter, and I can eat it.

 

I would be very concerned that drawn butter is simply melted butter and that the solids are not separated, based on all the things I have researched and the answers below.


I think that any chef or restaurant better be sure what they are serving in case people like myself think the solids are removed from the clarified butter and eat it. 

 

It is very difficult for me to join friends or family at a restaurant for a special occasion, because most chefs are using products with dairy in everything, from the rice pilaf to the roasted potatoes, they even brush butter on the steak to give it a sheen.

Also the whey powder that is found in cheap bread products and can even be found sprayed on corn nuts and smoked almonds. Also found on Fish in the grocery store!

 

And since when was proper cesaer salad dressing made with anything but eggs and oil, lemon and garlic.  Now it full of diary, even if you ask them to hold the cheese.

 

I find the most common reason people are clarifying their butter is to remove the allergens and have a better alternative to artificially manufactured spreads and oil products.  As well almost all spreads contain whey powder or milk solids, so this is the best alternative.

 

If someone is asking for clarified butter, I would ask them if they have a dairy allergy and be sure to run it through a coffee filter and get rid of all those solids.  (This is not the same as lactose intolerant!)

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