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What's something you always see at the grocery store.... - Page 2

post #31 of 82
Naked Women shopping!!!!!! Yeahhh!!!!Baby!!!! :D
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #32 of 82
Hearts of Palm canned, I use in green salad
or in a shrimp heart of palm remoulade....
I cut mine in circles not julienne.
texture slight ever so slight resistance....

Celeriac....slaw or remoulade...peel (cut off funky outer part) and shred. Great with Creole food in a salad.

Naked Women shopping????!!! could be dangerous as we lean over the freezer section.

Raw blue crabs huh, yep that would be one of mine pickled raw blue crab.

Parsley....oh darlin, flat leaf parsley finishes off alot of my dishes hot as well as cold. I love the way it cuts the fatty flavors, it makes things come alive like a squirt of lemon. Tabouli is a huge user, celery root slaw with carrots, parsley, red pepper and mustard dressing....oh gee in creole, jambayla, chicken fricasse,stews, soups etc......just right at the end of cooking chop up a handful and throw it in the pot.
I once tried the weirdest spikey oval yellow fruit with glow in the dark green seedy goo...not sure what was up with it, but it lacked flavor.
how do you cook with live snails....how do you clean um?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #33 of 82
MonPetitChoux: The canned hearts of palm remind me a bit of bottled or canned artichokes in both taste and texture and my mom actually used to use artichokes instead of hearts of palm because it was more difficult to find the latter. I haven't had the fresh heart of palm in a long time, but my mom used to put it in a Filipino oxtail-peanut stew.
post #34 of 82
It would have to be the trays of pig ovaries I saw when I was home last. The butcher said that they can't keep them in stock. I think he said that the Vietnamese were using them.........just the thought. Ate sheeps tongue when I was in Austria........had horrible dreams all night of eating Mary's little lamb...if I would have known b4 I ate it...
Try not to let your mind wander..
It's much too small to be outside on it's own.........
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Try not to let your mind wander..
It's much too small to be outside on it's own.........
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post #35 of 82
at least 15 years ago I ate dim sum in San Francisco with my then 4 year old and he wanted to try this rolled (cylindrical) grey (yep grey) gelatinous shtuff....not sure to this day what it was...
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #36 of 82
Thread Starter 
Shroomgirl,

Was it sweet or savory? Didi it have a filling like an eggroll or was it solid?
post #37 of 82
Was it sticky rice? It's wrapped in banana leave I think.


I love dim sum. Takes forever to make but it's so good.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #38 of 82
Nope just a4" cylinder of grey jell...savory
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #39 of 82
Thread Starter 
Well, it was definitely made out of some type of rice flour. Surprised it wasn't stuffed though. Have to do some research on that for ya... ;)
post #40 of 82
I eat um in rice gruel, but thousand year old eggs are something I see and wonder about alot...never bought.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #41 of 82
Thread Starter 
Shroomgirl,

The eggs smell extremely pungent, sulfurous. A piece the size of a pea would flavor a mouthfull of rice and provide a huge finish. It's a very unique flavor but really not that bad. I suppose it's an appearance thing with most people who weren't raised around them.

One cool thing about them is when you peel them, there are crystals on the surface of the egg, they look like snowflakes....

As well versed as you are in food and flavors, you should try some... ;)

[ June 29, 2001: Message edited by: cchiu ]
post #42 of 82
I tried'em once. It smelled way worse than it tasted. I don't think I'll be eating them again.
post #43 of 82
Thread Starter 
The following is taken from my post under the topic You Ate WHAT? Contest.: Gold Medal Winner

"Even though they are called "1000 Year Old Eggs" it only takes 100 days to cure them.

You should be able to find them at your local asian grocery store. They are usually duck eggs. They are extremly unique in appearance and smell. They look like black/grey jello with crystals (once you peel off the shell) and they have an extremely strong sulfuric aroma. (so don't be surprised by the smell)

This from an article 1000 Year Old Eggs by Chef Morak" :p
post #44 of 82
Ziggy-

If you are from Arizona 95% of the cactus you see in the store will be purchased by Mexicans who fry it up in scrambled eggs for breakfast. Unless they have a hangover, then they just laddle up a big bowl of Menudo- "the breakfast of champions"!

Mike
formerly of Albuquerque
Michael
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Michael
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post #45 of 82
cchiu:
Parsnips ain't bad. Someone already mentioned frying them like potato chips, which sounds good.

I was advised to cut them lengthwise into 1/8-inch slices and sautee them in olive oil. They are remarkably sweet and tender. You can go from lightly browned to crunchy, depending on your taste. As with chips, salt enhances their flavor.

Other than that, I don't do much with them, either.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #46 of 82
Thread Starter 
Hey shroomgirl,

Better late than never... any chance this comes close?



Black sesame rolls can vary in colour from a translucent grey to completely black. This is from a dim sum in Hong Kong.
post #47 of 82
tamarinda. it's an ingredient in worcestershire sauce and pop.....otherwise a mystery.
post #48 of 82
Yucca Root
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #49 of 82
So shroom, mudbug,and redace, what does it taste like?
Or is it one of those foods that don't taste "like" anything else? Which brings up a question I've had:
If some food/taste doesn't have a clear referent--something it is very similar to--does that excite you, repulse you, confuse you? Years ago, I went to Japan, and it seemed like every other dish I ate contained a green herb I'd never tasted before (you all probably know what this is, but I still don't). I was startled because there was no taste in my vocabulary to compare it to. So I began to feel a little queasy. I don't think it was the herb, but my own discomfort at not knowing how to define what I'd tasted. I think that if it had tasted like something I knew and disliked, that would have been easier to deal with.
Has anyone else had this experience? Or am I just a wuss (or a delicate flower :D ) when it comes to food strangenesses?
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #50 of 82

HorseRaddish!

But rarely is it good! Most of the roots a flacid and some are even rotting!
Its rare but sometimes I can get a nice root that makes allot of horse radish!! I love that Stuff!
post #51 of 82
tamarinda smells like barbeque sauce-except not. hits you in the same registers that merlot, nutmeg and espresso do, very deep and assertive. on the other hand it LOOKS like brown beanpods that have been hidden under a doghouse for thirty years.
new tastes? if i smell it and it doesn't incite a gag reflex, i'm good to go. then i think about it and pick at it in between sips of water for the rest of the meal and drive everyone else at the table nuts trying to describe it.
post #52 of 82
mine would be a orangish-yellow mini football type thing with some kind of spikes coming out of it. spikes are few and seem equi distant.
Haven't had a nice jewel/dominicks person to get me even the name of it. Its usually on a small table with all the unusual fruits of the store.
Feels like it could be squishy to touch but haven't had the guts to even touch it.
post #53 of 82
liv4fud, I think you may be referring to either a cherimoya or a guanabana. They are simliar fruits. But I have not tasted either!

mudbug, I love parsnips!!! They are so sweet! I like to roast them with some carrots and potatoes and serve with a lovely roast or chicken. MMMmmm......Problem is, they are pretty expensive. At least in my neck of the woods. They are a treat to us!

I don't know who brought up the cactus, but it is quite tasty. It is served a lot in my area (southern Colorado) and it is mainly served for breakfast. Here it is know by it's Spanish names though. If you see 'nopales' or 'nopalitos' on a menu, cactus is your dish!

I think my useless item would be jicima. I don't know what to do with it other than in salads. And I can only eat so many salads.......phooey......rabbit food. :p

There's also pumpkin. Pie and soup. Is there anything else???

And what about radishes. Bleck! Other than giving you bad breath, are they really good for anything???
Is there such a thing as Queen
of the Grill? Why do men only
get a royal title over the
barbeque? I should be queen.
Girls like to play with fire too.
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Is there such a thing as Queen
of the Grill? Why do men only
get a royal title over the
barbeque? I should be queen.
Girls like to play with fire too.
Reply
post #54 of 82
Liv4fud, you're thinking of the kiwano melon. Here's a picture . Is that what you meant? I've always been intrigued, but they're pretty pricey (over $3 each).
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #55 of 82
Yucca root is GOOD.
post #56 of 82
Thread Starter 
Don't be afraid to try new things. Ask around (as you did here). Do google searches, etc on how to select and when to eat.

Kiwano Melon
http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

If you try a single fruit you are not familiar with, don't base your judgement on that one fruit. Like strawberries or peaches, you can easily get some that look fine on the outside but just are simply not the optimum representatives taste wise.

By not trying new things, you could be depriving your taste buds of something you thoroughly enjoy and may have been missing all your life.
post #57 of 82
there's probably a million things I pass by, but never think to use. I can say I've been using parsnips for years. They're "cheap" here at times. I add them in my oxtail soup, and it's that much better.

I like trying new stuff.
Life without broccoli isn't really life, is it?
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Life without broccoli isn't really life, is it?
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post #58 of 82

bingo...

mezzaluna and mudbug,
kiwano melon it is.

well regarding not knowing and trying... have an interesting story.

used to be intrigued by this thing called persimons in the market. asked around. a nice person who didn't speak much of english - was kind enough to explain how to use one - wait till its soft to touch (like avocado) and orange and remove the skin and enjoy. said it was very sweet... Well I went with their suggestion as that was the same person who helped me out to pick avocados (yes I didn't know how to pick those either and loved guacamole to death)

needless to say I waited atleast 2-3 days patiently till it was orange and soft to touch. cut it up and it smelled so sweet and divine and then I took a bite. for the first second I had a delightful and divine taste. then... :eek: as if like there was a bitterness explosion in my mouth. no liquid or drink washed it away. tongue scrapper didn't help either.

needless to say I was very disappointed. that doesn't keep me from trying though. but am left with a bitter taste in my mouth (literally can taste it even now).

actually most of the times it happens in restaurants too when I try to be adventurous. Most of the times I have landed on my face. But its the joy of finding that other *usual* dish keeps fueling my search...
same for the items in grocery stores as well...
post #59 of 82
pumpkins and radishes are used in a lot of traditional indian cookings like curries and soups.

Soups (like sambhars and dals) often use or allow the use of any/all local vegetables. radishes in particular impart a very delicate flavor to the dish. Keep them whole (small round ones) or dice them and use say a handful of cubes to start out with. Depending on the strength of pungency - which should evaporate mostly - you will have nice flavors.

Sambhars also allow the use of pumpkins - especially the one with the white flesh as its more neutral to taste. But I have used the other one (diced) instead of potatoes and it brings out a distinct flavor to the party.

also use in many a stews - pumpkins impart a good flavor. one note of caution, based on the cooking times, I usually add them near the end otherwise it has a tendency to mush-out on me. Use radishes when baking chicken on a pan. Instead of rack use a mixture of root veggies along with radishes.
post #60 of 82
Though I am rarely stumped by things I see at most mainstream grocery stores, I love to go to Asian and Latino markets to see and try new things. It can be quite a liberating experience to walk down the aisle at one of these and not know what half the stuff is!!!

As for Kimchee, the stuff we usually see in the markets (the fermented napa cabbage in a firey sauce) is only one type. There are literally hundereds of different kimchees. Though most all of them are a mix of pickled or fermented vegetables, there are many different kinds out there. We usually don't see those others though.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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