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Your thoughts on this knife

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi,
just wondering what you all think of this one? Fairly cheap price so it makes me wonder if this knife can be as good as they say..
From the Lee Valley catalogue..

http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...=2,40733,40738
post #2 of 13
I've been tempted by that one a few times myself. I find Lee Valley to be a reputable source and they don't carry junk to my knowledge. It's a carbon steel, not a stainless (which is technically a carbon steel too) so are you prepared to keep it oiled and care for it properly?

It's cheap enough that it's worth trying out. I just haven't got around to ordering it with my other orders I've placed.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 13
I've never tried this knife, BUT, looking at the picture, I see only 2 rivets in the handle. This is not a good thing as the blade plays against them. As a result, the blade loosens up from the handle. I once knew the proper term for that part of the blade that extends into the handle, but gosh darn, am having a brain burp at the moment. Lack of the third rivet sends up a warning flag to me and personally, I would take a pass on this.
post #4 of 13
I reckon the term you're looking for, Bubbamom, is tang.

I don't know as the two-rivet thing is as important as you make out. Depends on a lot of things, such as whether or not the tang and handle are full-width, the overall manufacturing quality, etc..

Some of my oldest, and favorite knives have only two rivets, and I've not had the handles loosen.

I'm not familiar with that particular knife, but, as a rule, Lee Valley stands behind every product it sells. And given the price, how could you really go wrong? I just might order me a couple, even though as a general rule I do not like knives with fitted handles.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 13
In modern knife construction, rivets are highly overrated. Epoxy technology beats rivets now. I'd bet the epoxy holding the scales to the tang do the real work in that knife.

I'll see if I can find the link for that info, but it's time to play chauffeur for my kids.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 13
Get yourself a Victorinox,

I bought mine 5 years ago, fantastic knife :)


http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-10-.../dp/B0000E63ZR
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
KYHeirloomer,
I just called my local LV to see how many they had in stock. I think for the price I'm going to give it a try..

Hey, it'll always come handy in the garden if its doesn't perform well in the kitchen right?! Ha! I've got myself a few duds out there already.. :rolleyes:
post #8 of 13
Yes, the Victorinox knife is a good knife. I own a number myself. And Joyful has some high quality knives too. But this particular knife speaks to a somewhat different audience than just the kitchen.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 13
Great


All my other Vicrorinox I had them for 25 years, its worth the investment :)
post #10 of 13

Rivets/Pins and Epoxy

Mike Stewart is a knife maker. He has made/makes knives for Blackjack, Marbles, AG Russell and many others as well as his own company, Bark River Knife and Tool. I have a few of his knives and they cut amazingly. He's my source for the epoxy is the key, not the pins/rivets. The rivets are largely for looks and hold the pieces together while the epoxy sets and even then aren't necessary.


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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 13
Looking at the picture it appears that the knife isn't much wider than the handle, hence you wouldn't be able to chop without hitting your knuckles or without keeping the handle off the edge of the table so that didn't happen. If that is the case, it wouldn't work for me, but everyone is different.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #12 of 13
I don't think that's quite right.

If you look closely you'll see that it's a shaped handle, and the finger groves are considerably recessed. The handle material does descend to the bottom of the blade, true. But there is a similar extension at the heel. All in all, I think there's plenty of hand room.

But I don't think this knife is intended as a working tool in a serious professional kitchen. Rather it's a multi-purpose tool designed for home use, or as part of a camping kit, or left in a hunting cabin. That sort of thing.

To me it's very reminiscent of the "butcher" carried by fur traders; an inexpensive, all-purpose knife.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 13

global

i prefer global to be honist because the blade and the handle are one peace or if you like the wooden ones victorinox are good and you can get them razer sharp with a good dimond steel :chef:
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