or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

rack o' lamb

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I was jus looking for a good marinade for lamb racks; currently I’m using a garlic, pepper and cilantro with olive oil.
Every cook desirves a drink after a long days work.
Reply
Every cook desirves a drink after a long days work.
Reply
post #2 of 14
Heh, salt and pepper does it for me. :)
post #3 of 14
I agree with Kuan. If you sear the outside to develop flavor and color before roasting in the oven, any herbs or spices on the surface will just burn in the frying pan. You can add a crust of some type after you've seared it and before putting it in the oven to finish.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #4 of 14
Marinades are great but, for a rack of lamb? Man, that's the sort of thing that really doesn't need the "boost" a marinade can give. A nice spice rub, sure, that's really nice. Great cuts of meat don't need that extra push. That's not to say that you can't get a good result this way but I wouldn't assume that you need a marinade for this sort of cut.

--Al
post #5 of 14
I agree Al - plenty of sweet flavour in the meat already, no marinade needed.

And leave the fat on PLS!! hehe You don't have to eat it if that's your preference, but the flavour it gives the meat is to die for, as well as protecting the sweet meat inside from the heat. It acts like an inbuilt marinade. I love it as one of those once in a while indulgences
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #6 of 14
We go with a very light balsamic/honey marinade. Emphasis on the word "light" because as mentioned already, lamb has alot of flavor on its own.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
heh thx a lot guys. shame that the rack got changed on the new menu that came out tonite. it went from this entree with mint demi to a appetizer of just 3 grillmarked bones instead of a rack of 8. total chaos, our front of the house are to say the least retarded. but ill keep the rub in mind so i dont feel like such a noob next time im messing with really nice cuts of meat.
Every cook desirves a drink after a long days work.
Reply
Every cook desirves a drink after a long days work.
Reply
post #8 of 14
Anyone ever make carpaccio out of lamb rack? Cripes it's awesome. You salt the fat cap nice and good first. :)
post #9 of 14
I've never tried lamb raw. I'd be hesitant as I find cold cooked lamb unappealing. The mouth feel of that congealed fat bothers me.

I love lamb when it's hot though.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #10 of 14
Sorry you trim it, like the rack that comes from SAMS, and then a little more.

Maybe I'm just nuts but back in the day when I could eat fat I loved it. Freeze it, slice it wafer thin, dress it with vinaigrette.
post #11 of 14
I love raw lamb, my butcher is lebanese, he makes it only if its fresh, if not he cooks it, he has one inspector just for that, awesome :D

Hum great sandwiches, or you can purchase it from him seperately :)

Cheers
post #12 of 14
A little off-topic, but when I was 16 I traveled in Europe for six weeks. We had three home-stays (four days each) with families, one of which was on a farm above the Danube river on a mountainside in Austria. They kept cows and pigs and during the summertime the two sons looked after the animals. They'd come in ravenous at lunchtime. One day I saw the elder one come from the kitchen to the table with a large cube of something white on a small wooden cutting board, along with a pot of mustard. He dug in with a knife and fork. I asked him what it was and he told me "fat". Yup, he was eating a slab of pork fat for lunch with some nice, grainy mustard.

Take that, Emeril!
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #13 of 14
sorry to sound really stupid but what is carpaccio ? I am getting married next year and one of the options is king scallops carpaccio ! pleas can someon enlighten me ? also can anyone tell me what a tian of prawn, mango, avacado and corriander is ?
post #14 of 14
Scallop Carpaccio basically means raw scallop, probably sliced thin and drizzled with an acidic liquid to "cook" it.

Tian is modern cooking jargon for a small casserole.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking