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Gravadlax variations?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Following an Easter promotion at our local "Walmart related" supermarket, my wife and I made and "harvested" tonight, a substancial quantity of gravadlax, using the ingredients that i've always used, i.e. salmon fillet, dill, salt, sugar and crushed black pepper. As usual, it turned out to be absolutely delicious, BUT, having more time to experiment these days, I wonder if any of you guys can offer any interesting and exciting ingredients to the list? I have heard of things such as cumin, brandy and juniper berries being added, but i'd love to hear your ideas!
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 
I just cannot believe that with the depth of experience and knowledge that is evident on this forum, nobody can offer any response to my post.
post #3 of 10
I like mine sprinkled with Scotch. :)

Buncha stuff here: http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/food-...k-gravlax.html
post #4 of 10
I like to shred red beet inbetween the two halves. When it is done you have a nice marbled deeper red color.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #5 of 10
I'm so glad Kuan found the link to that thread. I found it really helpful when I wanted to cure some trout fillets (after the curing, I lightly cooked the trout, since freshwater fish should never be eaten raw; parasites, ya know :( ).
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #6 of 10
I am fond of Brandy, brown or raw sugar, salt, and cardommon.
I usually shroud or wrap them in cotten or cheese cloth, turning
them everyday.

I like the beet idea, haven't tried it.

Fennel seed, Pastis or Pernod, coriander, salt, sugar, and white pepper
is kinda nice too. Of course you can't go wrong with lemon, lime, orange
zest. Good luck.
post #7 of 10
I found cardamom and allspice (suggested in two unrelated posts earlier) too overpowering for gravlax. Ones I followed advice of swedish friend and used juniper berries - much more refreshing. Along with coriander seeds, caraway, dill, orange zest and white pepper it adds wonderful "pine wood" breeze to fish. And (let's not forget the classic way to serve it) it complements dark rye or pumpernikel like they've never been separated before! Alcohol is truly a matter of personal taste, all mentioned spirits work same well.

That was the ouverture, General Q is:
What do you think is best way to preserve cured salmon's freshness & flavor during storage ?

C
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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post #8 of 10

Rub the r-goo on it

Rub some really good olive oil over the surface to keep air off it and wrap in plastic.....no?

Chef B
Keep those fires burnin'
 
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Keep those fires burnin'
 
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post #9 of 10
Brandy works very well, and gives an awesome flavor, as does Peachtree.
post #10 of 10
Olive Oil. Agree. Sure, for freshness..but for flavor - wouldn't more neutral oil be better? Grapeseed or walnut?

Anyway, I like "oil & plasticwrap" method more than "foil & freeze". But still, is cutting air access essential for safety and flavor preservance?

I bumped into HOT discussion at Cooking For Engineers - Recipe File: Gravlax
author wraps salmon in cheesecloth and washes (with water) spices off fillets! Opponents are furious and , in most cases, suggest to eat it right after it's made.

C
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
Reply
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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