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Who is your favorite celeb chef? - Page 5

post #121 of 186

It's RAW! (Smash with fist) . . .   LOL... That cracks me up.

 

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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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post #122 of 186

OK. Second round .......... (I read through the thread and found these.)

 

Ming Tsai .......... Wonderful to watch. He uses ceramic knives too. He should be an Iron chef. I don't even know the latest guy. DUH @ Me I guess. 

Jacques Pepin ... Fantastic. I don't see him on TV much. I'd marry his daughter in a second. 

Michael Chiarello .. Really cool, but I just can't use much of what I've seen him make. Maybe I just haven't seen him enough. 

Martin Yan ......... My goodness. He is fun to watch. His knife skills are really fun. 

John Besh .......... Fantastic too. I've never seen him on a show of his own. He should be an Iron Chef. I worked for him after Katrina. Never have I ever worked for a better person. 

Rick Bayless ...... He is cool and real. I didn't work for or with him, I was just stationed next to where he was. He won't let anyone make any mistakes. He corrects in such a way it's like he is your best buddy covering your butt. 

 

<< tangent >>

* note to ChrisLehrer .....  Post #74 made really good points. TY.

 

I think Aaron Sanchez is a really good "Chopped" judge. 

 

<< OK back, but in a new direction altogether >> 

 

I think I'm an expert chef, just ask me and I'll tell you. (That was a joke. Don't get bent out of shape.) I'm saying this in regards to "authenticity" and such. I make three(3) particular dishes that true natives of where they come from really like very much. The first is the "spring roll". I call it "Asian" as opposed to any specific nationality, because to tell the truth, I don't know which it would be. I have however had Korean, Chinese and Vietnamese people all tell me that they were very good, and better than they've had anywhere else. The next is paella. I bought an old beat up paella pan for $4 at a flea market. I've combined at least 3 or 4 recipes I've seen and I include everything that I like in mine. I now have two(2) major Spanish wine distributors ask me to make it for them when they are in Chicago doing presentations. The last is cannoli, my favorite dessert as a kid. I make mine including styles and ingredients from all over Italy. I had an old man cuss me out at an Italian wedding saying "Whatta da heck issa dis? Whatta you ... Sicilian?" The bride's father dropped his wineglass in laughter. The tray of about 200 cannolis was gone in about 20 minutes. With all three(3) dishes I don't know authenticity from abracadabra. But the people native to where the dishes came from seemed to think they were good. I'm not arguing or anything. I'm asking. Who's to say? Like I said before, TV is for entertainment. Isn't cooking and eating for entertainment too? 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #123 of 186

I had an old man cuss me out at an Italian wedding saying "Whatta da heck issa dis? Whatta you ... Sicilian?"

 

I reckon I'd have dropped my wine glass too. While hoping there were no Sicilians in the room. eek.gif

 

But it does highlight the problem with "authenicity," particularly with countries like Italy. The immigrant waves of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were, primarily, Sicilians and Neopolitans. So, until recently, most Americans connoted "Italian food" with those two. That's what we were used to, after all. And while the various ethno-Italians certainly differentiated between themselves, the rest of us didn't.

 

More recently, the food of Tuscany has all but replaced the others when it comes to "Italian," because that's what's fashionable. In each case, however, even people from Italy, if served any of those dishes, would recognize them as "Italian."

 

Now, while they can be similar, the foods of Sicily and the foods of Tuscany can be very different. Yet they retain enough in common as to be, generally, Italian in nature.

 

Same with the three dishes you describe. Despite any modifications you may have made, the overall impression, with each one, is that it belongs to that cuisine, and even natives recognize it as such. Seems to me, that makes them "authentic," even though you might not find that specific dish in their countries of origin.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #124 of 186

Read most of Pepin's books and, as a 12 yr old, really appreciated the photos and step-by-step in "La technique'".  Stillhave them too.

 

Never watch TV, so I have no idea about the TV shows.

 

While working in S'pore I had an opportunity to watch Martin Yan cook live.  He was good, but very embarrased, as he only speaks Cantonese, and alas, S'pore is a Mandarin speaking island.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #125 of 186

Most entertaining... Ramsay

One I most like to watch... Nigella or Sophie Dahl.

 

The food is secondary.

post #126 of 186

Used to love watching the Two Fat Ladies - BBC. I now enjoy watching New Scandinavian Cooking (PBS), all the hosts/cooks are refreshing and I also enjoy the antics of Anthony Bourdain.

post #127 of 186

Quote:

Originally Posted by caribbeanpot View Post

Used to love watching the Two Fat Ladies - BBC. I now enjoy watching New Scandinavian Cooking (PBS), all the hosts/cooks are refreshing and I also enjoy the antics of Anthony Bourdain.


I caught that show a few times on PBS - loved it. Loved all the other stuff going on too - Where they would go around the villages and markets in town. Really an awesome show.
 

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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post #128 of 186

I like people with spirit, attitude and the ability to back it up, so you'd think I'd like Bobby Flay more...but I don't. I do like Ramsay as he portrayed himself on Kitchen Nightmares and The F Word..F Word especially

 

Anthony Bourdain on both his series "A Cooks Tour" and "No Reservations"

 

Mario Batali, cause I like his style and quite frankly, for a big man he can move in a kitchen like a dancer. Also he smiles like he is holding a secret that if you asked him just right, he would say "I don't know what your talking about."

 

Marin Yan and the Cajun cook from the old PBS cooking shows

 

I would gladly rinse rice and wash floors to work with Morimoto, as humble as he seems that man is an unbelievable talent

 

and I don remember his name, but I once caught an old series called a Fat Man in France...i think...I still remember him trying cheeses and eating dried apples saying what a marvel they were

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #129 of 186

Gunnar, I think you are referencing Tom Vernon, a British broadcaster and writer, best known as the titular "Fat Man" of a number of popular travelogues. 

 

Fat Man at Work and his first television series, Fat Man in the Kitchen, deviated from the travelogue style of the other series. The former featured Vernon talking to people working in factories, while the latter was a cookery program filmed in his own kitchen in Muswell Hill in which each edition was devoted to cuisine of a different country.

 

He had these other radio shows too: Fat Man on a Bicycle (1979), Fat Man in Italy (1980), Fat Man on a Roman Road (1983), Fat Man at Work (1983). His TV shows included: Fat Man in the Kitchen (1985-6, two series), Fat Man Goes Norse (1987), Fat Man in Argentina (1990), Fat Man Goes Cajun (1991), Fat Man in France (1994), Fat Man Wilts (1995), Fat Man of Kent (1996). I think he has also written five or so books. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #130 of 186

the Cajun cook from the old PBS cooking shows

 

That would be Justin "Some Hot Sauce To Taste" Wilson?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #131 of 186

Just as an interesting aside, have y'all heard the promo for tonight's Restaurant Impossible episode? One of the owners is saying, "we didn't have any experience running a restaurant, but what could go wrong?"

 

OMG! Should we make him a list? eek.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #132 of 186

Ina Garten has changed my life! She has turned me from a good home cook to an excellent home chef with her techniques, tips and recipes. Her recipes are easy to follow and always come out exactly right. She includes excellent pictures in all of her recipe books which provide inspiration and give you an idea of what the meal should look like. Everything she makes looks good! I followed many chefs but until I really fell in love with Ina, I hadn't known what it was to have a real inspiration. 

post #133 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Just as an interesting aside, have y'all heard the promo for tonight's Restaurant Impossible episode? One of the owners is saying, "we didn't have any experience running a restaurant, but what could go wrong?"

 

OMG! Should we make him a list? eek.gif

now what fun would that be ky?...much more entertaining this way,in a sadistic kind of way!.......not familiar with the show, but do know that there are lots of businesses that open that a'way....you know, clueless... seems the restaurant biz is chock full of people who think that just cuz they can make toast without burning it, they should open up a' little place'...how hard can it be?...well, maybe we make it look easy!....some are hard headed, know everythings who really don't want your advice anyway...not really...they just want to show you what they got

joey

did everyone thaw out yet? coldest its ever been in southern arizona...whole town froze basically...nobody buries their water pipes more than a few inches...well, til now! no water was to be had in the whole town..people driving an hour away...makes you REALLY think about being self sustained though... big mess at the ranch, the heated pool pipes busted and its a water works, the pond pump froze, kitchen water pump froze so no water in the kitchen(we hauled and boiled), employees couldn't make it to work cuz their car batteries froze...guests had to change rooms due to frozen pipes, no heat...that kind of thing, guests not being either able to get there or to leave due to worse weather elsewhere in the country...fun,fun week...glad its over and we're warming up nicely...hope you all are doing the same....sorry for the ramble, but thanks...
 

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #134 of 186

much more entertaining this way,in a sadistic kind of way!.......

 

Hmmmmmm. I always pictured you as a sweet, demure, friendly sort of gal. Now it turns out you're really a Frank Baum character. You know, the one who's name ended, ".....of the East." rolleyes.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #135 of 186

I like Robert Irvine .He is not the greatest cook as such, but given all types of situations  he pulls it off one way or another. I can appreciate this because it is like doing outside catering. You never know what can happen but whatever it is,""" Just Deal With It"""

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #136 of 186

I was surprised to see your entry as it is the exactly like mine. Alton is smart and informative and of course the early black& white shows or on PBS were my training ground.

post #137 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

much more entertaining this way,in a sadistic kind of way!.......

 

Hmmmmmm. I always pictured you as a sweet, demure, friendly sort of gal. Now it turns out you're really a Frank Baum character. You know, the one who's name ended, ".....of the East." rolleyes.gif


yeah, i'm a regular pollyanna...thanks for the great review for eric ripert's new cookbook......now it's a 'must have'...geez, portobello fries with truffle oil aioli...nice!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #138 of 186

I gotta chip in with everyone else touting the Alton Brown flag.  I really enjoy his approach to a show--Science, silliness, encouraging, and through it all still very serious in his message.  The fact that his set looks like an actual home also helps.  I know it's just a set, but the layout on his show has a measure of authenticity to its design, IMO.  I dunno, it's just really great watching his work--Any recipe he throws out there, I feel pretty secure in being able to do, and safe in the knowledge that it will come out alright.  The man is just enthusiastic, and an enjoyable watch.

post #139 of 186

geez, portobello fries with truffle oil aioli...nice!

 

More than just nice, Joey. The word is addictive. If you make them, figure on at least doubling the number of 'shrooms.

 

One of the things I most liked about the book is that, unlike most chef-written books, this one is real; inspiration for the professional, and recipes the home-cook can easily replicate.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #140 of 186

Alton Brown, mostly because I believe that the food network is what it is today thanks primarily to Alton Brown. That and any REAL chef. Some of them are really just personalities, and I don't have much respect for them. Bobby Flay. There's a guy who started at the very bottom and worked his way to the very top.  Gordon Ramsay. Compare a picture of him only a few years ago to now. He has clearly worked himself to death just to be as close to the best as he can. 

post #141 of 186

I believe that the food network is what it is today thanks primarily to Alton Brown.

 

That would be what? Superficial, non-educational, and insulting to anybody---professional or at-home---who really cooks?

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #142 of 186

Since we have our first foodchannel in Belgium, they show subtitled programs from all over the world.

I'm already a big, big, big fan of Italian, but based in the UK, Giorgio Locatelli; fantastic no-nonsense cook, contemporary presentation of original Italian  dishes. I love it!

On the other hand I came to totally dislike Gary Rhodes and his utterly boring Carribean Tour.

post #143 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

I believe that the food network is what it is today thanks primarily to Alton Brown.

 

That would be what? Superficial, non-educational, and insulting to anybody---professional or at-home---who really cooks?

 


Thank you for that! I've resisted posting on this thread because that's my opinion, too. Well, that, along with the fact that so many of the recipes are not something an at-home cook would make for various reasons (cost, time constraints, availability of quality ingredients, etc).

 

For pure entertainment, I like Nadia G, from Bitchin' Kitchen. I probably won't ever make any of her recipes, but she's so much fun to watch.

post #144 of 186

ChrisBelgium

LocandaLocatelli in Mayfair is one of my present faves when I visit family in London!  He's a great chef.

 http://www.locandalocatelli.com/web/menu.aspx

post #145 of 186

Thanks for posting that link, Ishbel! What a nice place and look at that menu. Next time I'm in London, that will be my place to go.

post #146 of 186

He is (maybe was?) involved in a restaurant within the Churchill Hotel - don't know if he's still cheffing it - I've never been there, so have no opinion on it!

post #147 of 186

My favorite was and still is Emeril Lagasse, for one main reason, watching him showed me that cooking can be fun, and he was right!  chef.gif

post #148 of 186

The chef who cooks most like me and whose style I most try to match is Jamie Oliver.  Great style, fabulous approach and genuine, simple presentations that make the food the star - not the chef. Alton Brown's science is fun, and Mario Batali is a genius in the kitchen. I'll leave out my negative feelings towards all the others here... :)

Deglazed
My Continuing Journey Into the Kitchen...
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Deglazed
My Continuing Journey Into the Kitchen...
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post #149 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribbeanpot View Post

Used to love watching the Two Fat Ladies - BBC. I now enjoy watching New Scandinavian Cooking (PBS), all the hosts/cooks are refreshing and I also enjoy the antics of Anthony Bourdain.


Oh, I forgot about the fat ladies!  I loved them.  But most of their recipes were heart attacks waiting to happen.

 

OTOH, this seems as good a place as any to say I cannot stand Anthony Bourdain.  What an arrogant a$$.  He wants to turn food into the kind of class dividing issue that home decor is.   A world where he and his cronies are the upper echelon and everyone else is dirt beneath their feet.  I heard him on NPR once.   It revealed that not only was I right in my assessment of him, he was even worse than I had suspected.

post #150 of 186

I enjoy watching Guy Fieri. I like how he will actually go into restuarants and try items as well as show how they are made.

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