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Another Turkey Meatloaf Question

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
The things one thinks about in the middle of the night when a cat is sitting on your face <LOL>

In order to get a more moist meatloaf it's been suggested that I add some milk to the bread crumbs. OK, that seems traditional. However, would adding chicken or turkey stock to the bread crumbs be just as good wrt moisture, and might it increase the turkey flavor of the loaf somewhat?

Thanks,

Shel
post #2 of 11
Hi Shel

I would give it a try for the stock, its worth trying :)
post #3 of 11
From my own experience, I think some of the best advice you've been given is that the milk and egg increase the binding, and the addition of fat (EVOO, etc.) will increase the moisture content of the final baked meatloaf.

Addition of stock, which is mostly moisture, will tend to evaporate and still leave you with a drier meatloaf, in my experience.

doc
post #4 of 11
Science to remember:

The crumbs are actually there to keep the loaf aerated; if the meat (especially turkey) is too closely compacted, you could use the finished loaf for a football.
Egg yolks add moisture and bind ingredients.
Egg whites dry out food.
Stock rich in collagen will help bind, add moisture, and improve mouthfeel.
"Sealing" the top of the loaf (assuming you're baking in a pan, not freeform) will help keep the moisture in by blocking evaporation out the top. You might get the same effect if you bake the loaf well covered (then brown the top later).

(Haven't tried this, so I'm not sure.)
Some of the fat will leach out anyway over the longer cooking period, so it doesn't really help with the moisture the way it does with a quickly cooked burger. When I make meatloaf, I add all sorts of juicy ingredients along with the egg-and-crumb binder -- lightly sauteed vegs, salsa, bits of leftover gravies and stocks (not necessarily all at the same time!) -- never milk (just wasn't brought up that way). I usually use part bulk sausage, and the fat comes out so it's only help with flavor.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
[quote=Suzanne;168612]Science to remember:

The crumbs are actually there to keep the loaf aerated; if the meat (especially turkey) is too closely compacted, you could use the finished loaf for a football.

Egg yolks add moisture and bind ingredients.

Egg whites dry out food.

Stock rich in collagen will help bind, add moisture, and improve mouthfeel.

"Sealing" the top of the loaf (assuming you're baking in a pan, not freeform) will help keep the moisture in by blocking evaporation out the top. You might get the same effect if you bake the loaf well covered (then brown the top later).

(Haven't tried this, so I'm not sure.)

Some of the fat will leach out anyway over the longer cooking period, so it doesn't really help with the moisture the way it does with a quickly cooked burger.quote]

Perfect. This is pretty much what I've been looking for - a simple, concise compendium of what certain ingrediends to and how they work. I'm gonna save this message as I'm sure it will come in handy over time. Thanks so much!

Shel

post #6 of 11
The collagen rich stock is what led CI/ATK to using some added gelatin.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 11
Shel-
another thing I have added to meatloaf or meatballs is sliced bread soaked in milk- squeeze out the extra milk and use the mushy bread as filler w/ and egg for binder. Tastes great!
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #8 of 11
Breadcrumbs soaked in milk is the answer, as you would use in the South African dish of Bobotie if you've ever tried it.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've been giving the idea some thought, but don't really know what kind of bread to use. A lot of people suggest white bread, or good white bread (I take that to mean not to use the sheap, air-filled supermarket bread, like Wonder here in the US). Bread suggestions?

Shel
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
What do you mean by "sealing?"

Shel
post #11 of 11
It seems to me that covering the loaf wouldn't help give it a crust (seal the top of the loaf, I presume). It would just steam under the foil or lid, wouldn't it? I'd worry that moisture would end up in the baking pan and just evaporate. Hm...... I'll try this and see!

Putting a sugary glaze on it will "seal" the meat loaf. Ketchup has a good deal of sugar in it; even tomato sauce does, as tomatoes have some sugar in them; just oven roast or dry them and you'll find they taste like the fruit they are.

For moisture I finely chop onion, garlic and maybe some celery in the food processor. That adds a lot of moisture to the meat loaf. I'm from the same "school" as Suzanne, in that I didn't grow up with milk added to meatballs, meat loaf etc. This "slurry" of vegetables gives a lot of moisture, but you still need bread crumbs (fresh is better than dry) to hold the moisture. If you want to get your kids to eat carrots or other veggies, hide them in this "slurry" and they'll never know they're there! :D
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