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Chervil vs Parsley

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Recently i found a recipe using chervil and wondered if it can be replaced by parsley?
And what’s the difference between two? They even look familiar!
post #2 of 9

i think you can

but you have to know that parsley smells stronger than chevil and for garnishing i prefer chevil

you can wait for another reply if you want to make sure
post #3 of 9
Let's not forget that there are two common forms of parsley, curly leaf and flat leaf.

Shel
post #4 of 9
Same family, both in the carrot family I think.
chervil is not as durable or green. More
delicate flavor. Commonly used as a garnish.
Rarely introduced into cooked foods while preparing.
Shelf life is far less than curly or italian parsely.
Very nice delicate final touch. Can't think of a lot
of dishes where chervil is cooked. Sometimes with
an extremely mild fish or with chicken. Its not the
powerhouse of green flavor like parsely. Some say
it has a mild anise flavor, I agree. Good Luck!
post #5 of 9
When I needed chervil and had none, I would substitute fennel fern (the leaves at the top of the stalks). Much closer in taste. As even stephen says, chervil has a very mild anise/licorice flavor. Parsley, whether curly or flat-leaf, has an entirely different flavor.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #6 of 9
I'd substitute the tips of the fennel shoots or tarragon. I hadn't used chervil much until I came to France!
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Many thanks. All this information was very useful for me. I think i'll try to find some interesting recipes with chervil and parsley to taste the difference.
post #8 of 9
I believe an omelette fines herbes uses chervil, parsley, and chives -- a French omelet with the herbs sprinkled on before it's rolled. That's a perfect way to get the essential flavors. Or, if you have some of each, just do a tasting, clearing your palate in between with plain bread or crackers. You'll notice the characteristics immediately, I promise. :lips:

But if you can get chervil in a store at a reasonable price -- wow, can I come live near you? It's a very delicate herb (turns from lovely bright green to yuck yellow in just a couple of days, not matter what you do to keep it :( ), and is awfully expensive as a result. Or are you growing your own?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #9 of 9

It is very good as a garnish for asparagus soup, cold or hot.

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