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scones

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Picture of scones




picture of clotted cream



recipe for scones
Scones

2 cups flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
¼ cup soft butter
2/3 cup milk plus or minus
1 egg

sift flour and baking powder together. Blend in soft butter.
Beat egg and add to milk and stir into flour with a knife, do not stir to much.
Turn dough onto counter and knead 10 times, just enough to tidy the ball of dough.

Roll lightly to about ¾ - 1 inch, cut with cookie cutters place on dry cookie sheet
And bake at 425 till nice and golden on top 12/15 minutes.
It is better to at least double the recipe, and add 1/3 sugar to dough if you want sweet scones
qahtan
post #2 of 14
qahtan,
What you call scones we here in the Southern US call biscuits.

To us biscuits are bread that you eat with a meal and scones are a little desert bread that you eat with your coffee for breakfast or an afternoon snack.
Betty
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
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"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Scones,,,,,

These also are served with afternoon tea, or as a snack, scones made in UK are not eaten with or are part of dinner.
Some are made with raisins in them or some times cheese. my family and I like them split buttered and a dollop of strawberry or similar jam and then a dollop of cream.
Some restaurants in UK down in the west country serve afternoon tea and it is scones cut with a 1 1/2 inch cutter, I like a 3 inch cutter. If I had a nickel for every scone I have made I would be quite well off.
My son in law came to visit last Sunday and was quite peeved that I hadn't made any scones. :-))) qahtan
post #4 of 14
I know the feeling well, scones (biscuits to us) are something that a Southern homemaker will make almost every day. We eat them with bacon or sausage and eggs for breakfast, split with butter and jam.

They are sold at fast food restaurants as egg and bacon or sausage sandwiches or covered with sausage gravy.

We also eat leftover breakfast biscuits for lunch, split with a piece of ham and melted cheese on top or any other piece of meat that was leftover from supper the night before; we also eat them with supper.

As far as the size of the cutter goes, I use the top rim of a drinking glass as a cutter; a habit I picked up from my mother and grandmother.

Scones (like the ones in the picture I posted) to us are a special treat that you make once in a while for a special occasion; like when company is coming. I guess your son in law would have been quite surprised to find one of those waiting for him. J
Betty
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
post #5 of 14
I always make my scones in a pie slice shape and usely with raisons and lemon jest
post #6 of 14
I add dried cranberries to my scones.... my family loves them for breakfast or snack. I, personally, only like them fresh out of the oven with a cup of tea!!
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #7 of 14
I make scones all the time, too! Scones with butter, home-made raspberry or strawberry jam and a dollop of clotted cream (an English addition, but better than our extra-thick double cream!)....

I've often thought that the idea of eating scones, which have a sweet taste, with savoury food is not to my taste. I suppose it's all what you grow up doing...

Useless information: For anyone who might be interested, scones should be pronounced to rhyme with gone not stone. Interestingly, the Stone of Scone (where ancient Kings of Scotland were crowned), is pronounced Skoon... We just like being contrary, I suspect :roll:
post #8 of 14
I've made scones and I've made biscuits... to me they are not the same.. sweet scones with raspberry preserves.. you can't beat em.. ;)

Don't forget to feed the pig...

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Don't forget to feed the pig...

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post #9 of 14
That is exactly the point they aren't the same thing.... to those of us who live in the US.

But to those who live in the UK and obviously Canada what we call a biscuit is what they call a scone. What's more they seem to have two varieties, sweet and not sweet. What we call a scone seems to be something that we must have invented because they don't recognize it as anything they are familiar with.

We Americans have a way of taking food items from around the world and making them uniquely our own. I have been told many times that what we call Chinese food is nothing like what people in China eat; and living in South Texas I can tell you from personal experience that what we call Mexican food is really TexMex. It is a blending of the two cultures and carries little resemblance to what people in Mexico eat; it can get confusing when you have people from different countries that use the same name for different foods.
Betty
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
post #10 of 14
Why is there no sugar in the recipe???
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #11 of 14
I'm from Alabama, in the deep south of the U.S, and to us this is a biscuit. I guess there is a U.S. scone and a U.K. scone.

The scone I prefer to make is tender, flaky and can be either sweet or savory. But it's the flakiness that sets it apart from a biscuit.

I suppose the best description would be a cross between a southern biscuit and pie crust.

Jim
post #12 of 14
I have a recipe for a spiced scone which is very good. It has cinnamon, ginger and something else I can't remember off the top of my head. They are great with clotted cream, which costs me a fortune here in Texas. These spiced scones are the British kind.

I will repeat, biscuits and scones are not the same. ;) They may look the same, but British scones are not same as American biscuits. They are not made the same way and do not taste the same. I love sausage, biscuits and gravy, but no way would I eat sausage and gravy on a scone. :crazy:

The White Lily Flour company, which makes the best flour for biscuits (a soft winter wheat flour), has a biscuit recipe pamphlet that has some really good scone recipes in it-I think that is where I got my spiced scone recipe. These are like British scones, not the flat things sold in the US as scones (I like those, too.)
Cheers,
texasflute
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Cheers,
texasflute
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post #13 of 14
The only real scone is a "British Scone" (Cue - Rule Britannia)
Anything else is bleuucchhhh!
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #14 of 14
Ahem, Felixe

That's a SCOTTISH scone, not a British scone :roll:
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