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The plight of Private Food

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Shroomgirl's comment in the food budget thread about the poor eating together and pooling resources reminded me of this quote.

It's from my most worn cookbook and I think the first one I ever bought for myself, The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Three Ancient Cuisines. Its the epilogue to the book.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #2 of 20
Powerful words that make you think.
Thanks for the nudge.
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
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I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
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post #3 of 20
I am always concerned when I see a person in the supermarket with a basket filled with private food. You know what I mean by private food, of course. Little packages of instant and prepared foods that indicate that this person intends to eat alone again tonight. We see a lot of this among the older members of our culture, and we always mumble something about being pleased with their sense of independence. It may not be independence. It may be simple loneliness.

I see a lot of that with younger people as well - people obviously eating alone or feeding just themselves. It's not just, or even mostly, older people.

Frankly, among the chief problems in our society is that there is a waning of sense of community, a lack of sharing, and a large number of our population lacking strong connections to family and friends. Just why this is I do not know, but I've been observing it for years.

Shel
post #4 of 20
Even worse, perhaps, are all those packages being bought as family food. Convenience is the watchword of the day. And even when we're together, it seems, we live in isolation.

I've mentioned this before, re: the KFC ads, and how they'd have us believe that a family actually eating a meal together at home is some sort of radical new concept.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 20
one of the "hip" new line of restaurants being touted in the NW are places that have communal tables.....it's been around probably in some form or other through the millineums....Santa Fe has a restaurant I believe it's the Pink Adobe that has a large community table for those that don't want to wait for their own space.
I think the pendulum will swing back, and communities will come back to socialize....farmers markets are a wonderful exponential growth sign of the desire. 133 at last count a few years ago of community gardens in downtown STL by one organization alone.
As always I'm a very strong believer in if you want to see that change work for it....there will be others in your community wanting to follow, wanting to participate but not necessarily to lead....if there are leaders making changes help them out, either fiscally or volunteering. That's my soapbox, I've stood on it through the years and positive change can & does happen.

Thought provoking though....dining should be the norm not the exception, how far we've fallen. priorities have changed. I was speaking to a friend who had been at Woodstock, he'd just turned 18 years old and spoke about what it was like. I had just checked out a documentary filmed at Woodstock...those of you that remember the 60's and early 70's, is my memory clouded or did people reach out and do acts of kindness just because it was the "right thing" to do. There was an instilled "right" and wrong......I was born in 1958 in California, my dad was in the AF and I can remember the social projects happening in Berkley when I was little. I can remember communes being talked about and the ecology and Silent Spring....maybe we're coming back around to that time....
thoughts?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 20
I live alone for 6 months a year and I cook ever meal as if there was more then just me. I do not skip on my food and never pre-package stuff always fresh except fot can tomatoes or chicpeas. I believe that the problem of our bad health is from these processed food even the bread, I make all my own bread and desserts. Beside I save a lot of money by doing it myself
post #7 of 20
Well, yes and no to your recollection. I arrived in the Haight-Ashbury in the summer of 1967 and soon after became aware of some of the good things that were going on in the community. There was a group that called themseves The Diggers and they had a storefront operation just a few blocks from where I lived. Amongst other things, every Saturday they'd bake bread for the community. The bread was baked in coffee cans using donated flour, and anyone who wanted the bread could get some, and anyone who wanted to help with the baking could do so. I spent a few Saturdays baking bread.

Across the stret from where I lived - on Shrader Street - was a Black Panther house. While the Panthers were regarded by many as a radical group of troublemakers (at least that was the presses portrayal) they also did a lot of Good Things for the low income communities in the East Bay and San Francisco, something that was often overlooked. Bobby Seal, for example, organized a lot of food giveaways and barbeques for the community - in fact, Bobby was a pretty good cook, especially wrt BBQ and grilling, and wrote a cookbook called BBQing with Bobby. Some great recipes and techniques in that book, but I digress.

Peter Coyote was around in those days, and was just starting his acting career, but he was also an activist. I believe he was involved with the Diggers amongst other groups.

And that was all just within a few block radius from my flat.

As for today, well, I have mixed feelings about our returning to those (seemingly) halcyon days. There does appear to be a renewed interest in environmental and health issues, but there's also a strong, vocal, and powerful contingent who oppose change and wish to maintain the status quo. We'll see how that holds up over the next couple of years.

Speaking of Rachel Carson, I recently heard a portion of a recorded speech she made. It was quite moving but not in the way you might think. It turns out that a lot of the DDT and other chemicals that were used in the mid-1900s have not yet disappeared. DDT, for example, can still be found in trace amounts in some plastics - such as the plastic used in the bottles that contain our "high quality" drinking water. This residue has been linked to an increase in allergies and other problems. BTW, DDT is back:
NPR : WHO Backs Use of DDT Against Malaria

I'll stop now - I can see that, if I don't, this could be a very long and rambling rant. Too early in the AM for that.

Shel
post #8 of 20
After rereading my threads it's amazing that any of you can follow the scattered trains of thought......jiminy, it's like Grand Central Station with connections not always apparent.

Sometimes it takes sitting back and looking hard at where we are as a society/community....what do we want our world to be.....then, comes the work in affecting changes.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #9 of 20
Yeah, Shroom, back then they did perform random acts of kindness. But so, too, do people do that today.

The difference is, for a short while the Aquarians had a public voice. So you heard about their activities. Nowadays, the media considers anything positive or non-violent to be boring and uninteresting.

Example: A friend of mine teaches high school Industrial Arts. His kids do some interesting things; like build and race cement canoes---something normally done only by college level engineering students. Try and get some media coverage of that. Ha! But if we drowned one of those kids, the TV stations would kill themselves getting out there to cover the story.

And, just to jog some selective memories, it's incredible how few people, and virtually no Woodstock documentarians remember things like water being sold there for 5 bucks a glass.

And as a random thought: If the communes of the 60s were such a good thing, how come they ain't around no mo'? Anyone who spent more than ten minutes in one can tell you why---they weren't nearly as utopian as their proponents and the media made out.

Teddy Bikel used to say, when people have sons they have good sons and bad sons. The good sons aren't so interesting to sing about.

The fact is, the world has always had more good sons than bad sons. Even now. It's just that few people sing about them.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 20
lolol... KY your post brightened my day, thanks for the laugh.

Woodstock, reminenses from my shroom dork buddy (he's actually a scientist) were that it rained through the weekend and cars were bogged down in muddy farm fields. Farmer's were charging $5 then $25 to tow cars out with a tractor/chain. so my buddy and 17 of his friends spent the day pushing cars out of the mud for no remuneration. $5 for a glass of water and in that time $5 was a lot more than it is now.

Communes, there are a couple of "intentional communities"in northern Mo. that run organic farms. .....and I get really hung up on what the rest of us are....unintentional communities? what the heck does that mean?

concrete canoes? um, what makes them bouyant? bizarre.

Good son songs....hmmmm......bad son songs......guess i need to pay closer attention to the radio cus none are coming to mind either way.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 20
"concrete canoes? um, what makes them bouyant?"

Just as an exercise for the student, Shroom: Warships are made of steel. How come they float?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 20
majic I suppose. Or some plausible engineered explaination....
concrete brings up connotations of "sleeping with the fishes shoes" :)
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 20
Think of it this way, Shroom.

Other than wood, no boat-building material is inherently bouyant. Well, foam, if you consider that a structural material. But all the rest, if just made into a plank, or a cube, or cast around someone's feet, will sink.

A boat hull is, at base, merely an air-bubble with a frame around it. All you have to do is assure that the specific gravity of the hull plus that bubble is less than that of water. Do so, and it floats. Don't do it, and you're in for a Poisiden adventure.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 20
Intentional communities. I like it. It means there's a plan.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #15 of 20
"A boat hull is, at base, merely an air-bubble with a frame around it. All you have to do is assure that the specific gravity of the hull plus that bubble is less than that of water. Do so, and it floats. Don't do it, and you're in for a Poisiden adventure."

Umm... well, yeah - but don't neglect your Metacentric Height. ;)

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #16 of 20

Irelevent, Mike

Metacentric Height has to do with stability, not bouyancy per se.:look:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 20
Before I lost my husband to cancer 10 months ago, I used to enjoy cooking and baking and he was always up to trying my creations and sharing with families and friends. And entertaining was fun. Thank goodness for 1-2 serving products because even when the spirit is willing, the motivation is not always there and there is only just so many leftovers that can be frozen. Gradually I find myself cooking and baking from "scratch" more often, and family and neighbors have shared (and hopefully enjoyed) my efforts. So there's a niche for these 1-2 serving items.
post #18 of 20
Isn't wood bouyant.....boats made from wood, plastic kinda seems bouyant maybe my rubber duckie and kayak are just engineered to float rather than inherently floating from the yellow plastic.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #19 of 20
Try and keep up, Shroom. :look:

Wood is definately bouyant. Which is what I said down below. "Other than wood, no boat-building material is inherently bouyant."

Your rubber duckie is as I described: an air bubble encased in a frame, all of which has a specific gravity lower than that of water. Ditto your kayak: If you opened the hull so the material was a flat sheet (and assuming it isn't expanded---i.e., foam) it would sink.

Your rubber duckie also illustrates why Mike's Metacentric Height comment doesn't apply. If the MH (or it's equivalent) was off in your duck, the whole thing would be imbalanced. It would maybe lay on its side because of that. But it would still float.

However did we get this deep into the mechanics of boat building?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #20 of 20
:)
something about floating your own boat verus having others along to help paddle and enjoy the ride.

I'm on my way to Louisville this afternoon for a few days. Hope the crowd has dissappated.....but the celebatory feeling is still around.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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