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Pie dough on a rainy day

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Good morning,

I made a pie dough (Alton Brown) this morning and it came out really poorly. It broke in many places and wouldn't stick to itself.

I've made it before and it's always come out really nicely. The only thing that's different is that it's a rainy, humid day.

So I know for next time, what do I have to do differently when it's a rainy day?

Thanks,
Michael
post #2 of 12

Pie dough

rainy days or whatever weather should really should have no effect on your pastry......
qahtan
post #3 of 12

Pastry/pie dough....

1 cup cold butter
2 cups flour, dip and scoop
1/4 cup sugar, depending on pie. omit if sweet filling
1 egg
2 table spoon water.

I do NOT rest this dough and it comes out fine, try Not to handle the dough
too much......
These picture although not good were taken to help a friend.... ;-))) qahtan















post #4 of 12
Michael,
It sounds to me like you didn't add quite enough water. I've made Alton Brown's piecrust several times and it always comes out great except that I have to use more water than he calls for. I did it once the way he does on TV and it just fell all apart. I added more water and it was OK.

Also for a quick rustic crust try this recipe some time; I got this recipe from an Amish cookbook that I purchased while on vacation years ago. It makes a wonderful piecrust; I personally have been unsuccessful at creating a rolled crust this flaky.
Betty

QUICK AMISH PIE CRUST

Mix in pie plate:
1 1/2c.+ 3T.flour
1 1/2t.sugar
1/2t.salt.

Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients.
With fork, beat in a measuring cup:
1/2c.oil + 3T.milk.
Pour all at once into pie plate and use fork to blend thoroughly.
Push into place with fingers; flute edges if desired.

To pre-bake: Prick; bake 425 about 15 min.




I think your pictures are great! This looks like a very nice piecrust.


By the way, I made your recipe for scones this morning for breakfast and they were excellent!!! My husband loved them; of course to him they were just some really awesome biscuits. Then who cares what you call them if they're good.
Betty
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
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"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
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post #5 of 12

Pastry

Once you conquer basic pastry, a whole new field opens for you, as there
are so many variations you can do, not just plain and sweet pastry.

I like to add ground almond, or hard boiled egg yolk, or cream cheese,
or syrup etc, then try puff, strudel, chocolate, etc the choices are endless. But with all I only ever use butter, I never add salt but it is salted butter. The better the quality butter the better the final taste.
This shortbread dough could also be used as a pastry

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi Betty,

Thanks for the answer and the recipe. I will try it this weekend.

One question I've had about the dough (and most of Alton's recipes): How well does it scale? If I double everything, will it work?

Thanks again,
Michael
post #7 of 12
On that I have no idea but I really don't see why it wouldn't work. It's all pretty simple ingredients, if you find that you have too much fat you can always add a little more flour before you add your water. But then pie dough is pretty much all about fat so I wouldn't be afraid to give it a try.
Betty
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
Reply
post #8 of 12
There are lots of basic pie doughs, the most common problem is too much water this can cause crackage later in the process. Rainy days can affect pie dough but only when you are making more than 10-20#.

Pie dough must rest, regardless of formula. Not only does this relax the glutton, it also allows the flour to soak up the liquid what might look like dry dough will look smooth about 1-24hrs later. If it looks like a smooth dough right out of the mixing bowl chances are there was too much water added or it was overworked.


The best forumla: by weight
3 parts flour: 2parts butter: 1 part water
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #9 of 12
i suspect the problem was not the rainy day but that different flours and fats work differently. Did you change brand of flour or butter? did yuou substitute one fat for another? Or did you refrigerate the dough too long before rolling?
While it's true that baking requires fairly precise measurements, i find that you have to also use your own feel for things. A pie crust will crumble as you roll it if there isn;t enough water. Since flour and butter here in italy is very different from in the states, all my pies came out greasy until i started doctoring the recipes. I had to learn to rely on eye and feel. When you've rubbed or chopped in flour and fat, and added the water, try to press it together in a ball. Then pull the ball apart like trying to split it, using your hands. If it holds pretty well together without crumbling, it should be ok. If not, crumble it up, sprinkle with water, and toss, then try again.
IF YOU'RE CAREFUL and don't mix or work with hands but simply toss, when adding water, you will find you haven;t made gluten at all, and can just roll out and avoid the problems deriving from refrigerating the dough. (The problems being you end up with a hard ball which you then have to wait to warm up, but you may be in a hurry and then the cold dough will crack! - perhaps this time you refrigerated it a long time?) It's so much easier to just roll out right away. If rolling it out you find it is too rubbery (you roll and it retracts) then you will have to rest it in a cool place. But it definitely is NOT always necessary.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I should have mentioned this before. When I put it in the ziplock bag to rest it in the fridge, the dough ball cracked in two down the middle. I knew right away that something was wrong (Duh!) but kept on anyway just to see what would happen.

I rested the dough in the fridge for 45 minutes instead of the 30 that the recipe called for.

Does this extra piece of pie information bring about any "Aha!" moments?

Lost in Montreal,
Michael
post #11 of 12
There's a difference between pie crust and tart crust.

Tart crust is homogenous, smooth, and it is a short dough.

Pie crust is flakier.

Don't confuse the poor newbie! :)

So, with your pie crust my friend, after the butter/shortening is incorporated, add just enough cold water so it comes together. The actual amount will be not more than 2-3 tablespoons. Don't knead too much.
post #12 of 12
Well, the cracking of the dough when you put it in the frige already tells me you needed to crumble it and sprinkle more water.
then the refrigeration, i think once it's cold through, it's cold, you can leave it overnight if you want, won;t make much difference. You'll need to get it to room temp again if you want to roll it without cracking. (Won't be easy if you didn;t put enough water, but you can also sprinkle a little water to glue broken pieces even as you roll.)
anyway,. one way to soften is to hammer it with your rolling pin - bang bang bang, that will speed things up. also i suggest, if you DO have to refrigerate, flatten it into a thick cylinder, not a ball, it takes less time to thaw that way.)
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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