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Pulling Sugar Question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
When you begin to pull sugar in order to make fondant it gains a nice very shiny look to it, but I find that as time passes it loses this look. I was wondering if there is any possible way to keep this shiny look on a piece of sugar.
post #2 of 8
Simbebe I think first we have a confusion of terms. Fondant while wide ranging in potential meanings is not used with pulled sugar. The shine you refer to is the light reflection and refraction of multitudes of tiny cracks produced as the sugar cools. When you pull the sugar it should be at the coldest it can be and still be able to pull it in order to produce the shiniest pieces. If it isn't cool enough (and we're not talking a lot of degrees here) then as it cools the residual heat will seal the cracks leaving a duller finish.
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
I see, around what stage should the sugar be boiled to in order to achieve something that I can pull and remain in the shiny state?
post #4 of 8
What type sugar are you using? Granulated or isomalt. Either way would not pull it over 20 times. If you over pull then it will lose its shine. And CH is right with everything he said. Hi ya CH!
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
I'm using granulated and what happens to the sugar if i pull it too many times? Should I just pull it until I get the right shine? And what stage (like soft ball or something) should the sugar be at to do this?
post #6 of 8
Looks like we have to go back to the basics. Pulling sugar happens long after the soft ball stage. It is a process that is way more involved than just melting sugar. Follow some of these links to get an idea of what's involved.

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/pastr...r-dummies.html

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/profe...culptures.html

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/profe...gar-class.html

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/profe...questions.html

This should get you on your way.:chef:
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #7 of 8
What I should have done to start with. Thanks Ch!
post #8 of 8
I like to use the colored sugar pellets, much faster..just melt and shape etc.
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