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Rice - To Rinse, or Not to Rinse

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I've heard arguments on both sides, but I'm wondering what you guys think. I have cooked rice both ways (mostly short-grain) and I don't notice too much difference in the outcome, maybe just a bit less starchy, kinda "cleaner," for lack of a better description.
post #2 of 14
My experience has been, unless you're making risotto, rinse. Removing excess starch off the surfaces improves the rice and may wash off particulates on the surface.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 14
I always rinse Basmati very well or I find I end up with a pan of porridge!!:o
post #4 of 14
To rinse or not to rinse - that is the question :)

I never rinse beforehand. I use the rapid boil method for 9 minutes (not 10 - it makes a difference) and then rinse thru in the colander with very hot water after. It leaves the rice nice and separate. I should say I always use long grain rice or brown rice - get good results with both. (Can't stand risotto, it tastes like pap - gonna cop some flak for that comment I reckon hehehe maybe I've never had it cooked right)

Although I reckon I've heard for very specific purposes and types of rice that you should rinse beforehand, up to 3 times. Experiment and see what you prefer.

Have you tried steaming rice?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
I always steam it. I use my ricecooker for short-grain and I cook long-grain in a regular pot over the stove. I only ever rinse the short-grain, but it loses its stickiness a little bit, I think. I pretty much wash it out of habit, b/c that's what I was taught, but I recall a friend telling me not to rinse it b/c nutrients get lost?


btw, thanks for all the info, guys, and advance thanks to any more info!

oh yeah, and risotto, that's a completely different story! no rinsing, no way!
post #6 of 14
I used to work at a chinese place for awhile and what they did rinse it to wash the starch off the outside of the rice. This caused the grains not to stick together as much after the cooking process. The white rice is always going to stick together somewhat, but the the brown rice only sticks if you don't wash it first.

you actually make it a little healthier to eat if you wash some of the starch(starch=carbs) off of the rice.
post #7 of 14
I used to work at a chinese place for awhile and they did rinse it to wash the starch off the outside of the rice. This caused the grains not to stick together as much after the cooking process. The white rice is always going to stick together somewhat, but the the brown rice only sticks if you don't wash it first.

you actually make it a little healthier to eat if you wash some of the starch(starch=carbs) off of the rice.

On the other hand one of my favorite uses for rice is to use it to thicken a puree soup. I like to use rice to thicken it If I want a creamier consistancy to the soup. For this use I would not rinse the rinse the rice so the starch would help act to thicken the soup when i puree it.

these factiods apply to just about anything with a high starch content.
post #8 of 14
rince or not to rince.I usually put unsalted butter in the pot and dump the rice,stirr constantly till the rice changes color,add stock and cook as directed. My restraunt made black truffle risotto and it was a culinery experience.anyway...good cookin...cookie
post #9 of 14
I've read that rinsing washes away what little nutrients there are on the rice - like Niacin for example.

My wife and MIL (Chinese) insist on rinsing the rice because - well- that's the way it's done. Been doing it since time began. It may be because what the rice farmers in China used for fertilizer was (is?) extreemly unpleasant. Concern for the sensiblilties of some readers prevents me from elaborating! Modern production methods and particularly here in the US negate those concerns.

I think the starch is in the rice, not on it and besides, if you are using chop sticks to eat it you certainly don't want the grains to be separate.

I personally never wash rice, no matter what kind. But please don't tell the missus!!!

Jock
post #10 of 14
Chinese dude here and I've always washed rice as mentioned, at least 3x, as well as allow the rice to sit in cold water for 10mins before replacing the water then steaming it or in a clay pot over the stove or even in a rice cooker. Comes out perfectly every time.
post #11 of 14

no rinse

the way i cook rice, that is not in risotto (and i don;t really like risotto either, the only way i really enjoy rice is plain boiled with butter - nothing else) is to boil it like you would boil pasta - put it in a big pot of water and boil till done to taste, aldente. In that way, you drain out any impurities anyway, and you have rice that stays separate, if that;s what you like. No doubt nutrients go down the drain with the water, but if you're using white rice, the nutrients have been taken away already anyway. I do prefer long grain rice, and actually prefer converted rice which has more flavor. Neither of these is good for risotto, of course. I make risotto often for the family, but not my favorite way at all.
In neither case do i wash it. I figure, unless you're getting sand or bugs or slugs off something (vegetables, mainly), there is hardly much point in washing to remove germs, since the food is being boiled anyway.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #12 of 14
I mostly use perfumed rice & have always rinced it 3 times.
post #13 of 14
I usually cook basmati, usually pilaf-style (w/some oil, onion & spices); I don't rinse it.

I seem to remember reading/hearing some Indian-food expert saying that you used to have to rinse basmati, but that in recent years changes in the processing eliminated the need to rinse it. Maybe that was just for basmati imported to the States.

Anyway I can't remember when or where I came across that little tidbit, so forgive my wild rumor-mongering. Please.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #14 of 14
I live in Malaysia and we have paddy fields and rice mills, to which I've visited them. During the preparation, the husk is removed by the machines but there can be dust or dirt settling on the rice at any point of time. Nobody washes the machines and equipments anyway and I think this is probably through in major rice producing countries. The process does not include washing the rice, though it may include polishing the rice till it looks kinda white and nice (compared to brown rice). It is then packed and sold to consumers.

The question whether to rinse or not can pretty much be answered :-

Yes - If you want to remove whatever dirt / dust which may accumulate in the husking, polishing and packing process

No - You don't quite care about the dirt / dust.

If you do wish to rinse the rice, usually only 1 rinse will suffice. Anything more would wash away some of the nutrients of the rice.
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Visit my site on home-cooked Asian recipes!

http://deliciousasianfood.com
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