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Bursting Brioche

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ok, I have this brioche recipe from Julia Child which I believe is the best brioche recipe. (Don't we all have "the best recipe" for something). Anyway, the very first time I made it, it was in a loaf pan, I baked it, it came out perfect. Literally picture perfect. Then every time I made it after, it always seems to burst from one side and the crust would be totally crooked. I know my seam is at the bottom cuz i see it when I unmould my loaf. Does anyone know why this is? I know I'm not baking it at too high of a temperature, it's only at 350'F. I also tried baking my loaf from room temp and fridge temp and the crust still bursts... what could be the problem??? Btw, I made brioche at this restaurant I'mworking at and it burst too.
post #2 of 13

Brioche Troubleshooting.

VAPOUR:
Good afternoon. Vapour, I believe if we can see the recipe & the directions perhaps we can spot the problem for you. As you know there are various kinds of brioche some with milk & some without just water.
Have a nice day.

Z~BESTUS.
post #3 of 13
what type of flour are you using?
perhaps the dough has been over or under worked?
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #4 of 13
my guess is that its underproofed.
post #5 of 13
I've used her recipe also, but in a springform.. always comes out perfect.. I've never tried in the loaf pan.

Don't forget to feed the pig...

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Don't forget to feed the pig...

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post #6 of 13
I agree with jessiquina......underproofing would be the first thing I would look at in this case.:smiles:
post #7 of 13
And if it isn't underproofed then my suggestion would be the dough itself is "under ripe" and needs a longer bulk fermentation.
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
I tried finding the recipe, but i think it's wedged in one of my books.. tried finding it online too but couldn't. I use all purpose flour for it, it starts with a sponge, and i usually let it ferment overnight in the fridge, then i mould it and proof it in the fridge overnight again. Maybe it is underproofed. Could it also be because the pan is too small? I'm not sure, but it makes 2 lbs of dough and i just bake the whole loaf in a large loaf pan. If anyone has any trouble shooting tips, I would love to hear it.
post #9 of 13
VAPOUR:
Good morning. Untill you can locate the recipe for us I can only speculate. This is my wild guess for your consideration.
I believe the gluten is not fully developed. That is why your baked product is collapsing. You see, if you are employing more than 6% of sugar you will have a problem in gluten develoment. You can have more than that amount even 12/17 percent if you like.... but you then must increase the yeast by about 4X times. Anyway when you can post the recipe then maybe a few of us can troubleshoot this problem for you.
Enjoy the rest of the day.

Z~BESTUS.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ok, here's the recipe:

Julia Child's Brioche

Sponge:
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast
1/3 cup whole milk, warm
1 egg
2 cups all purpose flour

Dough:
1/3 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
4 large eggs
2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 sticks room temperature butter

*In mixer bowl, mix yeast, milk, and egg. Add 1 cup of flour and mix with a wooden spoon until well blended. Cover sponge with remaining 1 cup of flour and leave for 30- 40 mins.

*To the sponge, add the sugar, salt, 4 eggs, and 1 1/2 cups of flour. Attach the dough hook and turn on the mixer to low speed to combine the ingredients, then to a medium speed to knead the dough.

*Let the mixer run for about 15 mins or until you hear the dough slapping the side of the bowl. If after 15 mins you don't hear the slapping, the dough is too wet. Add 2 tbsp flour and continue to run the mixer for a couple extra minutes until the dough starts to slap the bowl.

*Drop the butter in pieces into the mixer bowl and let the dough absorb the butter before adding the next piece. Continue mixing until all the butter is absorbed.

This is when I put the dough in the fridge overnight before I shape my loaf. Then I let it rise in a large loaf pan over night in the fridge as well. Then I bake it at 350'F for about 50 mins or until the loaf is done.
post #11 of 13
Vapour, as a professional baker, you should not be working in cup and spoon measurements as they are highly innacurate.
I suggest you re-write your recipe in "bakers percentages" (as Z-Bestus is working with), this will allow you to formulate a recipe from which you can then determine correct fermentation and proofing times and procedures.

Don't take this the wrong way - I am in no way questioning your ability or your profesionalism, however working in cups and spoons for dry weights is just too much trouble.

I am dropping out of this thread - bye and goodluck!
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #12 of 13

bursting brioche troubleshooting.

VAPOUR:
Good morning. After reading your recipe I strongly feel that what contributes to the problem are mainly two items.
1) You have too much sugar in this recipe in relation to the yeast. The yeast quantity should be increased by 50% or a total of 3 1/2 teasp.
(3/8, oz).

2) The baking temp. is way to low. Bare minimum required is 380 degrees I would consider 400 degrees.

Also I might add the following to you. I strongly feel that mixing for 15 minutes is too long. Why, because whereas we know the gluten needs to be developed there comes a time when the gluten strands breakdown from over development & cannot hold the weight of the water any longer water weighs 7 to 8 pounds per gallon that is heavy stuff. The water goes right to the bottom & we now have WHITE TRASH. Cannot save this. We must begin anew. Also use cold ingredients because when you mix for this long your machine generates much heat.... once your dough reaches & exceeds 90 degrees it will begin to emit an odor... You now can throw out this junk. It cannot be saved. I realize you mix longer in this type of recipe, however I would like to see you getting it done sooner like maybe 12 min. max unless you are using a spiral mixer & because they are more efficient you can get it done in 10 min max.
Vapour, Just a little baking science, as you know, flour, yeast, sugar & salt require a ingredient that will encourage them to do their thing. That my friend is WATER. The problem here is that all 4 ingredients are competing for this limited amount of hydration, when this occurs guess what... SUGAR ALWAYS WINS OUT!!!. The yeast is left standing at the post, doing nothing. Thats why we must increase the yeast. I might add I would consider using bread flour or at least bread flour & All purpose combined.
One more thing Vapour, I also believe you are under baking this concoction. Bake till the crust is a mahagony rich color & your temp therm reads 190 degrees. When removing the baking loaf pan out of the oven slam the side on your counter & quickly remove the brioce, if the sides are light in color throw it back in for 5 minutes only to darken the sides. Vapour in slicing this product consider using a electric knife or a serrated bread knife.
Vapour, I hope you will succeed with this recipe. I have modified it somewhat. I will discuss it only if you wish to change this recipe in the future.
Good luck my friend & have a nice day.

Z~BESTUS.:chef:
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Wow thanks so muchfor everyone's advice. I will definately convert my recipe to weight measurements.. it's just a recipe I make at home, so I never considered it. I will make it again soon. Thanks again.
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