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Baked Frittata?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I've saved up about 8 - 10 ounces of egg whites, and there's quite a bit of zucchini in the fridge. I thought I's make a frittata - add some more eggs with yolks, salt, drain, and squeeze dry the zucchini, add some green onions, maybe some diced red pepper, some spice, maybe an herb or two, mix in some grated cheese, and bake the whole thing in an 8x8 pan. Any suggestions for time/temp?

Shel
post #2 of 21
I've had the best results by starting on the stove on low/medium low until about 3/4 set then finish under the broiler.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
My stove doesn't have a broiler, at least none that I can find. In any case, this is an experiment, so I don't want to start it on the stove. I want to see if the whole process can be done by baking.

I've found some baking times in other threads and on the net, but they're all over the place, from 325-deg to 425-deg. There must be some "standard" for baking a few eggs and veggies.

Shel
post #4 of 21
hm....I've made fritattas recently using cast iron on the stove then pop into a 350-375* oven. a few years ago Food and Wine published my spring recipe for shiitakes, asparagus and chevre fritatta.....it's pretty good. Start with great eggs and it can't be beat.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 21
I meant the broiler in the oven. About 6 inches below the element.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 21
Shel, take a look at this one.. It's baked in the oven at 375, no broiler needed..
The recipe calls for a glass pie plate and different vegi's that you have, but that can be switched to what ever suits your fancy..

[Gluten-Free] Goddess: smart delicious recipes: Baked Frittata with Gold Potatoes
post #7 of 21
I've not used a broiler.....makes more sense.....but is not necessary.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 21
It's probably one of those things that the first time you do something and like the results, you judge every other method and results against your first experience. Even if it's not the correct or traditional method.

So it is here. The first time I made a frittata, the instructions included finishing under the broiler.

Maybe I'm stuck in a rut.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
That looks like a good starting point ... Thanks so much. Never thought to add 'taters, but I may try that as well if I've got any when I start cooking. If not this batch certainly the next.

Shel
post #10 of 21
left over spaghetti noodles works too.....I used to teach elementary kids how to make it when they were out on a farm field trip....you can add parmesan to it too.....pretty simple, good eats. Easy enough for cooking kids to make.

Phil, sometimes if you don't know "the proper way" there are less road blocks.
:) A broiler really makes more sense cus then you are getting the top done.....
I've made them without ovens at all, just in the field with a butane burner, pan and large plate or cookie sheet.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 21
My guess would be to bake it for same time/temp as a quiche
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 21

Crust Underneath...

I actually make my fritattas backwards. I heat the pan on the stove top, add the mixture of ingredients and scramble it lightly. This gives it some volume and puts cooked egg throughout the fritatta so the top is now wet egg on top a crispy bottom.

After it sits for about 2-3 more minutes on the stove top, I throw the whole thing in the pre-heated 350 degree oven and let it cook for like 20 min to finish it off. The top is not crisped - but if you have a lot of colorful veggies and such in there, I think this is a good thing.

See, a broiler would darken the top and wilt the peppers and squash and other goodies you have in there. This way, the presentation of your fritatta is still eye-catching and crowd-pleasing (trust me on that...) and you also have that wonderful crisp crust that tastes just so darn good (it's on the bottom).

Anyone else do it this way?... I can't be the only one, can I? (If I am, I must have really missed the boat on my technique here...)
Deglazed
My Continuing Journey Into the Kitchen...
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Deglazed
My Continuing Journey Into the Kitchen...
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post #13 of 21
I flip the fritattas out onto a platter so the top is not seen anyway.....usually sauted veg around edges and chevre blops on top.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #14 of 21
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post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, I found the broiler in my stove - it's way down at the bottom, very inconvenient to use, so the baking method is very handy.

The recipe and technique posted above was just what I needed to give me a nice starting point. I never thought about making a frittata with potatoes, so add another good idea to the mix. The (left over) 'taters and some veggies, plus all the extra egg whites I accumulate each week, allow for some good, inexpensive meals, perfect for snacks, quick and easy breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Now if I can only find my egg beater <LOL> although whipping up the eggs in the blender works nicely as well.

Thanks!

Shel
post #16 of 21
'smatter -- you ain't got no fork to mix the eggs? ;) Actually, I wouldn't use the blender -- whipping too much air into the eggs. But I like my eggs solid. YMMV.

FYI: a frittata with just potatoes and onions is a Spanish tortilla. And a wonderful dish it is, too. When I make it (or any frittata, for that matter), I usually flip it, rather than finish it in the oven or under the broiler. But all methods work. That's the glory of eggs, imo.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hey, I got a fork, but it was in the dishwasher :) Maybe I should get a frittata fork as well ... :D

Mostly I'll beat the eggs with a fork, but for this frittata thing I wanted somewhat fluffier results. In any case, I can see making a frittata about once a week or every ten days as the egg whites accumulate. Flipping, broiling, baking - all those techniques will work just fine. The flipping method is nice and quick and easy, and works great for me as well.

Shel
post #18 of 21
I use the MattFin method, but I buzz the egg mixture with an immersion blender so the eggs have some valium.
post #19 of 21
So sort of like a Hash Brownie?
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #20 of 21
Thank You For Paying Attention!!!
post #21 of 21
MattFin is right. Start it just like you would an omelet and then throw it down in the oven at 350 until it is almost cooked through and then pull it out to finish on it's own. I actually like the flipping and serving upside down technique myself. Super easy dish. Don't overthink it. Toppings are limitless.
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