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Cheese

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Here is a cheese question:

Why is it that cheddar is dyed with annatto in the states, but not in other countries. What is the purpose?
post #2 of 17
It is a tradition that dates back from the colonal times. In order for people to distiguish which cheese was made in the good ole U.S. and which cheese was coming from England. For political reasons they dyed it. Not sure what they used as an early dye.
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post #3 of 17
Fascinating. So that's why cheddar always looks so bright on U.S. cooking shows. Cheddar in Oz is fairly pale, prob like the British. Is Jack a cheddar, or more of a Colby?
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post #4 of 17
What started as a tradition probably got abused by modern marketing peeps who though "hey lets make it brighter and even more un-natural looking" and we'll sell More!" Sadly they were right but hey thats the good ole U.S. Like butter a pale yellow, whitish is a good color for cheddar cheese.

Cheddering refers to a technique of stacking then turning the curds, and is named after chedder england. Colby and Jack are similar in milk and treatment but they are not true chedders (they do not get "cheddered") but very often are mixed with chedder to prpduce blends.

Sadly food on TV cooking shows rarely show the best in what America has to offer as far as artisan products. Most reputable artisan dairies don't dye thier cheddar. Tillamook a commericial brand on the West coast is a fairly good. I like the one from Shelburne Farms in Vermont, and there are lots others.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
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post #5 of 17
BB,
Thanks for the clarification. Yes, the TV shows are a commercial enterprise and will never show the best of a country's products/cuisine unfortunately, I agree. They are, however, the only way people who are not on a travelling budget can get to see what's "Over There", so its nice to have at least an idea of what's out there. I'm glad the dyeing thing is not universal practice in the U.S. - from what I've seen the dyed stuff looks lurid and, well, unappetising. Some traditions die hard I guess.

Thanks again
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #6 of 17
Ok, but then why is double gloucester colored yellow in good ole england? Perhaps the origin of the yellow was to distinguish one type (region) of cheese from another? And people from gloucester brought this over when they settled in america?

I had a cheese made in france that was colored with flowers, same yellow as cheddar. Don't remember the name.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 17
After reading all this I'm curious now.. Is white cheddar available in the US?
Were I am we have both to choose from. Orange or white cheddars..
Me, I go for the white, especially the extra aged.. My DH on the other hand will only eat orange cheddar..
He insists that cheddar has to be orange to be true cheddar cheese! :rolleyes:
post #8 of 17
Some Scottish cheddars are reddish-coloured, too. But not my favourite, Isle of Mull cheddar :D
post #9 of 17
It most certainly is ;-))

Shel
post #10 of 17

A small sidetrack on the original theme...

I heard somewhere recently that the Edam cheese from Europe we are generally used to with the bright red waxy wrapping is only produced for export, and the locals won't touch it, the cheeses made for local consumption don't have it.

Anyone else heard of that? Curiousity is killing this cat! :eek:
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 17
Well, I've seen Edam on breakfast buffets in Amsterdam and The Hague... it had the usual red skin on it... But maybe that's cos at most hotels, the guests would be foreign?
post #12 of 17
How does mimolette get its yellow-orange color? It's pretty close to that of U.S. cheddar.
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post #13 of 17
Yes, that's the name of the french cheese i got that was colored with flowers (mimmole i guess) - i found it tasted too flowery for me. Maybe because i expected a cheddar taste.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #14 of 17
Mimolette comes from the French word demi-molle or semi-soft. Ironic since this cheese is only really at its best when it's rock hard, extra-old. There are no flowers involved on the production of mimolette, only rocou (annato), and it should not be flowery but rather fruity and butterscotchy when aged. Interesting note about mimolette: it looks like a cantaloup because of the cheese mites that inhabitate the rind and allow the cheese to breathe. Not to worry, they are thoroughly brushed off before going to market. Mimolette has been one of my favourites for a long time.
post #15 of 17
Hi Anneke,
Thanks for the info. The store where i bought it had a little note on it explaining what i said, that it was colored with flowers, mimmole or something. I guess the fruity taste is what really didn't go for me, but thinking it was made with flowers, i guess that influenced my taste buds. Going to complain next time i go in that store!
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #16 of 17
I have heard from many people that cheddar cheese is dyed with carrots juice to get the coloring. I dont know if it is true but many of the chefs I work with have all said the same. Anybody else heard of this?
post #17 of 17
I think that's a misconception. Carrot juice reduces the shelf like of the cheese and alters the flavour. Annato seed is harmless and tasteless and the most common colouring agent in cheese.
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