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pickling and preserving.....

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
today was preservation day at the kitchen......I'd bought cases of produce for parties last weekend and needed to make sure the remainder was stored well......it's always interesting putting up "fruffy shtuff" most pickling books either overcook or just have recipes that don't sound right to me.

So today I had apricots, made jam with vanilla bean, orange zest and sugar....cooked the apricot quarters for 30 minutes or so until thick then jarred. Anyone remember adding apricot seeds (shelled) to their jam? I'm usually a low sugar Sure Jell fan but didn't have any so winged it.....all the recipes I came across said to peel the apricots. didn't, and it seemed ok.

Rhubarb....again jam, with sugar, orange zest and candied ginger bits....turned out really well, will probably pull the 2 gallons of raw frozen out and turn them into jam tomorrow.

Tomatoes....1/2 cs of plum tomatoes. I halved them then baked on low for 2 hours.....put 1/2 in the freezer the other half I put rosemary twigs and hot olive oil over the top a bit of basalmic and stuck them in the fridge....not sure if they needed more acid for a longer fridge life....thoughts?

baby artichokes....man oh man, they are my weekness and such a pain. $48 a cs, $300 labor ....just kidding, but sure seemed that way. Anyway. I blanched them, froze 1/2 the batch then put lemon slices in the bottom of a jar and then the artichokes alittle salt then hot oil.....again I'm unsure if the 1/2 lemon will be enough to stablize the chokes. thoughts?

Beets...boiled, peeled then fragrant hot vinegar over a couple jars....two others I processed and have a feeling that the beets will be way over cooked.

Several other chefs in town are pickling....it's fun to see what everyone is doing. Josh at American Place pickled white asparagus, he's making mayhaw jelly today (I swear this 29 year old guy has the soul of a grandmother....a southern one at that.) He comes up with old world foraged produce that is rare even where it's found.
Andy White at Balabans is pickling cukes, cauliflower with turimeric, onions that are pink....saurkraut, peppers....he's pickling corn beef.....
Justine Keimon at Franco's is pickling beets and kholrabi....really good spice mix.

Some are mixing a higher percentage of water with viniager.....I usually go the other way. So, who out there is preserving? How are you going about it?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #2 of 33
Artichokes...Don't most commercial canned artichokes use a lot of vitamin C to keep the color?

What are you using for containers? Cambros or the big mason jars? I was thinking of trying out sousvide bags for canning.

I always figured the rule of thumb was 50/50 water to vin, but I use more vin with beets. Funny thing about beets, is that at work we just ended up marinating canned beets in the pickle liquid rather then starting from scratch.

This is just personal stuff, the job just buys kosher dills:

Kimchi...My second ever batch of kimchi is finishing aging a month ago. I used napa cabbage, chile piqun powder, ginger, garlic, kosher salt, rice flour, and a very little water. I goofed, and forgot to rinse the salt off the cabbage after purging, so its salty. I've been using it as a seasoning rather then a side dish.

Cherries...If I can get a good deal on cherries this year, I'm going to make "Cherrybim" cherries preserved in whiskey with sugar.

Onions...I'm also going to to make the pickled onions again from the Zuni Cafe cookbook. very good with sammichs.

Any idea's for malt vinegar? I've got a gallon and a half sitting around.
post #3 of 33
I picked up a great cucumber and carrot pickle recipe when i was in indonesia in Feb. they serve it before meals with beers! YUM YUM! works really well in the summer climate! Peel de-seed and slice the cucumbers and carrots to the same size, then sprinkle liberally with sugar and massage the sugar in till veg starts to bruise and relaese liquid.(give them a good squeeze!) add some very finely sliced red onion, then finish with 2 part water to 1 part vin and a good pinch of salt. That's it! I like to finely slice in some chilli as well. I find them best served cold from the fridge with a large glasss of icy cold beer! They keep for ages but are at they're best eaten when still crispy.
Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.
-Clemenza-

Lateley we've been getting more ROLL than ROCK......
Bernie Taupin
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Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.
-Clemenza-

Lateley we've been getting more ROLL than ROCK......
Bernie Taupin
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post #4 of 33
Thread Starter 
Andy makes malt vinegar aioli to go with his onion rings and fish/chips....pretty yummy.

years ago I got a whole lot of mangos and made chutney....$5 for Major Greys was a whole lot when you whip through a small jar in one dinner.....mine was not close to the commercial verison. Ended up eating some and throwing alot away.

It was tough coming up with a crisp good flavored long pickle cuke. The Ball Jar 7 day pickle is pretty darn good.....fussy to continue messing with but good.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 33
Have you tried using pickling lime? I hear that makes a very crisp pickle,
post #6 of 33

If its crisp I shall pickle

Artichoke color: Ascorbic acid, available at most homebrew stores, just vitamin c, and it is amazing, ok maybe I'm being a little dramatic, but I have been adding it to just about anything that loses color from spinach and asparagus soup, to herb oils to pickles. And speaking of pickles, I like to pickle just about anything that will stand up to the acid. Carrots, asparagus, ramps, Herring, cauliflower, you name it. I work with a lot of sous vide, and have found the quick pickle to work quite well, I like to throw a couple slices of red beet in the bag with my cauliflower for brilliant pink florets. Here in Mn. were still a little ways away from cukes, gonna try and make it through the whole winter this year with house made pickles on our charcuterie platter. Yum Yum Yum Summer is fun.
post #7 of 33
Thread Starter 
last year I was the recipient of 300 pounds of tomatoes....300 pounds.....tomato season is in the hottest part of the summer.....freezer space is at a premium so tomato jam filled the need. tomatoes, sugar, cider vinegar and ginger. Cooked down for a long time....really good on fresh chevre. The goal is to finish last year's batch prior to this year's starting up.

Normally the only jams I make are frais du bois, black raspberry and if available red/golden raspberry. A jam has to be really good for me to expend the time/exspense and energy.....that's pretty much anything but especially canned goods....then liquors find their way in at the end of cooking.

Thought about preserving lemons.....anyone have luck with them?

I'm still working through last year's pesto/basil and oil......getting near the end though.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 33
Preserved lemons are pretty easy to make, its just a matter of letting them age long enough. One trick we ended up doing is to juice the lemons and cutting the halves in half. Then you precede as normal. This they are more compact. We also used some spices (bay leaf, black pepper, clove, corriender) and some sugar in the mix.

They really need to age at room temp, and they also need to be submerged or they will mold.

Meyer lemons are supposed to be the best lemon for preserving, but YMMV.
post #9 of 33

Tomato Jam

This is the tomato jam recipe that's been in my family for more than 100 years. 7lbs tomatoes, peeled and put into a colander to drain. 7 lbs sugar, 3 lemons, 3 oranges, 2 T. chopped candied ginger, 2 cinnamon sticks, 1 tsp ground cloves. Slice the lemons and oranges paper thin, rind and all, no seeds. After the tomatoes have drained for awhile, combine all ingredients and cook until thick. Remove cinnamon sticks. Put in sterilized jars while hot and seal with canning lids, or put in sterile container and refrigerate. You can reduce the sugar by a couple of cups and use gelatin or Sure gel to thicken it some. You can also make this using green tomatoes, but the sugar needs to be increased by 1 cup. Green tomato preserves will turn nearly black when cooked, which is normal.
In response to Shroom Girl's apricot jam, it would be better to leave the peels on like you did because there's pectin in the skin (same with peaches and most other fruits). I usually run the cooked pulp through a colander to remove the skins and then add the sugar and cook down like for apple butter. Somehow though, I had the impression that apricot seeds were poisonous. I know the pit from some kind of common fruit is. Anybody know what I'm trying to think of?
post #10 of 33
Those would be apple seeds you're thinking of, they contain an arsnic like compound.
Keep those fires burnin'
 
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Keep those fires burnin'
 
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post #11 of 33
Thread Starter 
Apricot seeds have some medicinal qualities......and I remember hearring about apple seeds, as a kid we would just eat the whole apple core/seeds and all.

What about egg noodles.....how would you go about drying them?
I've picked up a couple dehydrators at Goodwill through the years.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #12 of 33
Make English style pickled onions with your malt vinegar!
My Mum and Grandmother made them every year. Very very good! :lips:
Malt vinegar is the only one for fish and chips too! Really, try it the next time you have some fries, you might be surprised..

You probably don't need a recipe, but here's one to peek at just in case.. :)

English pub-style pickled onions | Learn How To Pickle | Pickle Recipe
post #13 of 33
Why must you torture me with thoughts of fish and chips, Joyfull? I can't afford that plane ticket. :(

English style Pub Onions! That sounds wicked good. I think I might do it with either pearl onions or with rings (hope they stay crisp)

One place I worked at did a similar pickle but with pearl onions and wine vinegar. He'd slice them, toss with cornstarch, and fry them until they were crisp to use as a garnish.

In the mean time, I shall rummage up some chips and maybe a fish stick or two...
post #14 of 33
Ahh, fish sticks? No, no fish sticks! Oh my, you need to come visit us if you're lovin fish and chips! We'll take you to Cockney Kings for Halibut and chips and a lovely side of mushy peas instead.. Mmm, can't you just taste it??!! :lips:
post #15 of 33
Thread Starter 
has anyone pickled watermelon rind?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #16 of 33
I have. But not recently. Just followed the directions in the Ball Blue Book.

I also do a watermelon preserve, which is an old Eastern Kentucky specialty. This is not the rind, you underestand, but a preserve made from the flesh. Delicious!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 33
I haven't had any watermelon rind pickle since my grams was around. That stuff is like candy.
post #18 of 33
Thread Starter 
Cha ching.....I'd heard strawberry and asparagus season were ending last Wed. Sat. I picked up 12 qts of strawberries, 4# rhubarb (which was not suposed to come back after the horrible frost), asparagus.....all local.....made jams....lots of jam.....orange zest, chambord added for umph....
also picked up another case of baby artichokes and spent last night watching movies and trimming them...they are in a high lemon water bath...probably blanch and freeze the majority of them.
Picked up the new Ball Jar Canning Cookbook for only $1.98 at the grocery store.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #19 of 33
I think earlier in this post people were talking about pickled beets. There are two recipes in the Ball Blue Book, one of which my mother always made. It's the simpler of the two. I don't have the book here so I can't look it up. Anyway, it's a very good recipe. She makes great apple butter too, and I know that recipe is in that book also.
post #20 of 33
I'm making some watermelon rind pickle tomorrow. I'll let you guys know how it goes...

KYHierloomer- Care to let us in on the secret of the watermelon flesh preserve?
post #21 of 33
I heard you guys talking about me, or was that another Andy?

I make my own kim chee. You can drain the brine (Korean) or keep it as King's kim chee does.

I get Korean ground piments for mine. They're not very hot so you can add more for great flavor. A little dried bonito or shrimp paste added before fermenting is good.
post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 
I was referring to a professional executive chef named Andy....who works in STL and preserves. As this is under the professional forum that's pretty much the directions I take my threads in....."Professional Chef's Forum Discuss with other professional chefs the latest trends, kitchen and employee issues and more."
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #23 of 33

malt vinegar

is awesome for pickled onions, heres how i make mine, peel all the onions and pack tightly in to wide mouthed jars, then add a tblsp of sugar either white or brown (which gives a slight caramelly flavour with the vinegar)to each jar, a few pinches of pickling spice, then i play with other seasonings, in some jars i would add some hot little red chilies and some garlic, other jars just garlic, and even some jars with out garlic then bring to boil in a stainless steel stock pot malt vinegar and pour over onions , with a table knife, slid down the inside of the edge of the jar ( it stops the jar from cracking and it helps to get rid of the airbubbles, ) cover onions to top of jar, then place lids/seals on tightly, wipe down jars and let sit on a chopping board till cool, let sit in pantry or dark cupboard for 3 weeks before eating
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #24 of 33
that is something that has always intrigued me , i would love totry it, its not something we have here, any chance of sharing the recipe pretty please

we do pickled beets here , over here they are called beetroot, really easy recipe if anybody wants it

can you tell me about your apple butter , what do you have it with , and how long does it keep for
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #25 of 33

forgot to add

how do you make the apple butter (if you dont mind sharing the recipe)
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #26 of 33
Apple butter is the super reduced version of apple sauce. It scorchs like mad, so it needs to be stirred alot at the end. You can do the same thing with pumpkins or quinces.


For watermelon pickle, I still trying to get my aunts recipe. Otherwise, I'll be using the recipe from the Bell book or whatever.

The basic procedure is:

Peel watermelon rind and dice in ~1 inch cubes. Soak in a week brine overnight.

Drain and rinse the next day.

Cook the rind with sugar, vinegar, warm sweet spices (clove, all spice, cinnamon, black peppercorn etc), I think you add a little water as well. Until rind is tender.

Can if you want to, or store in fridge.
post #27 of 33
I was joking. But I get your point. I'm leaving.
post #28 of 33

apricot pits

you have to be quite careful with them as the inner kernal contains arsenic i think
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #29 of 33

butters??

So would that make like a solid block, like as in quince pate or would it be a softer construction
and what would you use apple butter for
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #30 of 33
Apple and pumpkin butters are more like a thick puree.
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