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what is the food originated form Canada?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Do you know what is it?
post #2 of 22
What is Poutine? A Poutine primer.

A couple guys filmed a documentary years ago on this very subject. The only unique food they came up with is Poutine...yum.
post #3 of 22
I'm not sure what you mean here. A recipe (fetuccini primavera, sic), a native food stuff (black walnuts,maple syrup) food process invention (gooseberry, freeze dried potatoes), post-colonial (the above mentioned poutine, nanimo bars, bloody ceasars, "sea" pie), or pre-colonial (pemmican). Is there a specific thing you're asking about or a survey?
post #4 of 22
Freeze dried potatos were invented by the early Peruvians. Chuño

Chuño - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
post #5 of 22
Very true, but I was refering to post-industrial, "infinite shelf life" mass production, kind of stuff. And, no, this does not make me proud!

Many of the examples I mentioned above are not without debate. Hence I tip-toed around date squares, butter tarts, and oat cakes.

Actually having been trained by French Chefs I was shocked to discover that every single food in the world is, in fact french. Who'ld-a-thunk-it?

--Allan
post #6 of 22
But don't tell the French that the Italians played a major role in that! Shhhhh:)
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post #7 of 22
Itali-whats?
post #8 of 22
I hate it when poutine is highlighted as Québec's or Canada's culinary contribution to the world....

On a more historically serious note, I recently learned that Sun chokes AKA Jerusalem artichokes are native to North Eastern North America. Natives introduced the tuber to Samuel de Champlain (French explorer) who brought them back to France to show the king. The first colonists of the new world (French) would cultivate this tuber until the British took over and they introduced a new tuber to this land i.e. the potato. Sunchokes have been more popular in Europe as a vegetable then in North America.

Nutritionally speaking, sunchokes contain inuline (a fiber) and slowly digestible starch that make it a healthier tuber then potatoes.

I think this would be considered a Canadian food contribution

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #9 of 22
Roasted Caribou
Arctic Char

The Cat Man
post #10 of 22
Oh...and seal oil

The Cat Man
post #11 of 22
They serve it at a local eatery called Big Foot Lodge. I order it each time I go there :smiles:
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #12 of 22
Do you mean food product or ingredient? I was thinking of tourtière. :licklips:
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post #13 of 22
Tourtière is a good one!!!

I forgot but Buttertarts is another... You can detect Canadians by this dessert.

Tim Horton's coffee!!!

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #14 of 22
Don't forget about the world famous Nanaimo Bar from BC
They are legendary!!

Cat Man
post #15 of 22
Seriously, are there no Nanaimo bars in the US? Shameful!
post #16 of 22
Possibly is Seattle
post #17 of 22
Is it true that the Ceasar salad was first created in Mexico?
Jannie
post #18 of 22
Tijuana
Yes it's true

Cat Man
post #19 of 22
And was named after someone's brother, Cesar. Has nothing to do with the former Roman ruler Caesar.
post #20 of 22
I'm Canadian, heres what I see in your posts that are genuine to our country:

Nanaimo bars, caribou, buttertarts, tourtière are gunuine canadian recipes, seal oil, I dont know arctic char :(
post #21 of 22
Ninga
Canada is the one of the worlds largest producers of Farm Raised Arctic Char. (or as they say in Boston...."attic chah"...at the hahbah...)
Over 80% of it is consumed inside Canada

If you ever seem to have an amazing salmon experience, there's a good chance it might be attic chah

Imagine a salmon that screwed a trout.....their baby?...that's Arctic Char

Cat Man
post #22 of 22
Artic char is also very fatty (with good fats) and tender, not flaky... yummy!

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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