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Weird Question Re: edible gold

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hello there,

I'm pretty fearless when it come it trying "new to me" foods. I've been intrigued by an eat indian braise of lamb where the pieces of meat are actually wrapped in gold leaf. Sounds pretty cool but--

I have fillings. One of the least pleasent things I can think of is that metal on filling shock things. Anybody have any experience with the combination of gold leaf and poor childhood dental hygene? I know gold isn't magnetic so it shouldn't be an issue but I worry.

Thanks in advance,

Al

(PS, I guess my life must be pretty good if this is the sort of thing I worry about!)
post #2 of 17
The only times I have ran into gold in food is once in a sparkling wine and once as a coating on a chocolate dessert. I have fillings. I think if it was going to bother me it would have been the time I had it on the chocolate. I was fine. I hope it does not bother your teeth either.
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #3 of 17
I don't think gold not being magnetic is the problem, nor is magnetism have much to do with "dental shock". It has to due with electro-chemical potential differences between dissimilar metals. In an acid environment like your hydrochloric acid mouth saliva, dissimilar metals that conduct electricity will form a battery. The battery gives you the shock.

doc
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
D.D.,
Thanks for the correction. Now that I think of it I have read that chewing on wool can cause the same reaction (why one would chew on wool is another question altogether, I mean I like lamb as much as the next guy, but still).

Dirk,

Thanks for the encouragement. I've had an entire pan of hot bacon fat spilled on my sockless, sandle clad foot and I've got to say the memories of dental shock makes me wince more. Maybe I'll hedge my bets and gargle double cream, to make my saliva more base than acid. Half jokeing.

--Al
post #5 of 17
Gold leaf is so fine , You won't even feel it on your palate. And your fillings won't know the difference.:chef:
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ma,

How is it for taste? Would it add much to a dish (other than food cost)?

--Al
post #7 of 17
Hi Allan,

(I am new to this forum). I like your questioning about gold.

Gold is quite inert so it won't readily dissolve in the saliva of your mouth hence won't produce charged ions that will create an electrical current or a battery because of dissimilar metals (from your fillings).

Mercury and gold can spontaneously create a amalgam (a metal blend) at room temperature but I doubt that is problematic even if your filling does contain mercury. Old alchemists observed that picking up pure liquid mercury by hand would instantly <silverize> a gold ring on their finger.

Gold leaves can cost pennies since gold is so malleable that a gram can be hand pounded into one square meter sheet (3"x3" approx).

Being inert, I doubt it taste anything and it will pass right through your digestive system unscathed.

I would this helps!
Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #8 of 17
I've never eaten gold but I have drank it in the past. I've had Goldschlager with the little flakes. Drinking it, I truly wouldn't have realized the gold was in it, if I hadn't been able to see it. I really couldn't tell it was in there once it hit my mouth.
post #9 of 17
Same here.
post #10 of 17
[QUOTE=Luc_H;175947]Gold is quite inert so it won't readily dissolve in the saliva of your mouth hence won't produce charged ions that will create an electrical current or a battery because of dissimilar metals (from your fillings).
[/QUOTE

Gold may be inert and not act as the anode, but it certainly can and is used as a cathode. Therefore a battery can exist in your mouth between gold and dissimilar metals contained in your fillings.

BTW: A square meter would be more like 36" x 36" rather than 3" x 3" wouldn't it?

doc
post #11 of 17
Hey Deltadoc,

Yes you are right that gold can be a cathode but that would assume that the fillings dissolves in ones mouth which is clearly not the case.
Aluminum paper is the classic example of filling shock because it dissolves in the saliva to become an anode to the filling (cathode). That would not be the case with gold. (I am working on theory here).

Yes I should have said 3ft or <3'> instead of using the quotation mark <"> assigned to inches. my mistake (I always mix these up). I am versed in metric and wanted to clarify in imperial units... thanks for the correction.

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #12 of 17
Well actually, there are dental cases where a person has mercury amalgams and gold crowns, and a battery situation develops which causes the amalgam to eventually disintegrate because it ionizes, and then has to be replaced. Not being a dentist, I forgot what the condition is "dentally" referred to.

Metric conversion to Imperial is one of the reasons why the Hubble didn't work when first launched. Guess we're all human and make mistakes. I've made plenty of them! Fortunately not so much when cooking is involved! :)


doc
post #13 of 17
Ok Deltadoc, you got me guessing... (searching the net) ...the term is called dental Galvanism. It is the battle cry for the anti mercury amalgam (filling) dentistry crowd.

It's a very slow process so I guess it would not be a factor in this case which is to cause an electrical sensation in Allan's fillings while he munches on gold. I stand corrected though on the gold not degrading the amalgam and the dissimilar metal battery theory.

Didn't NASA lose a Mars probe because of imperial-metric conversion also recently?

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Wow, I love you guys! I used to be a Library assistant at a University / Engineering School that had a Food Engineering Department. This brings me back to the cook / scientist conversations we used to have around the Circulation Desk. I'll never forget the epic literature search we went through to prove why peanut butter sticks to the roof of our mouths! Good times! Actually, Luc, you're in Montreal, the peanut butter thing was for the the CBC show "Quirks and Quarks"

--Al
post #15 of 17
Hi Allen
This is a great question and very interesting discussion. I've also often wondered if gold leaf would have this effect. However, with all the theory, what i'd like to hear is someone who has or hasn't felt the "electricity" effect. That's what I'd like to know before trying gold leaf. Anyone ever actually get that shock feeling? Anyone who's eaten it who has fillings ever not gotten it?
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #16 of 17
Ok, tongue in cheek, I'll bite! Someone send me a LOT of gold, and I will test out the theory....personally! As a true physicist, I realize that to test a theory requires statistically significant sample sizes, so send PLENTY of gold!

Frankly, I've always wanted to make that Escoffier recipe that uses gold!

LOL

doc
post #17 of 17
Hi Allan,

Quirks and Quarks... that's the CBC radio show with Bob MacDonald (right?). I don't catch it as often as I would like to.

Hey Allan,
Start a new thread... I want to know why peanut butter stick to the roof of ones mouth.

(and LOL for Deltadoc's last comment.... physicist? I thought you were a physiCIAN?! )

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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