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What good is a potbellied pot? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Kuan - I agree - its for witches to make potions and poisons in. The traditional dark colour goes well with the bubbling steaming green ichor. The shape is for holding the magic in :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #32 of 41
The broomstraw!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #33 of 41
It just occurred to me why the pot is pot bellied! It's because the spoon they use to stir the pot can reach all inner surfaces of the pot, thereby making sure everything gets moved around uniformly.

Square corners are much harder to stir, and when you're in front of a blazing open fireplace, you don't want to spend much more time than you have to stirring the pot.

Make sense?

doc
post #34 of 41
Doc!

That makes alot of sense be it a paddle spoon or a ladle.

Actually, I think it would be easier to ladle out of a pot belly then a flat bottom since the shape accommodates the curved motion of ladling .

Good aha moment!

Luc
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #35 of 41
Yep it sure sounds plausible doc! Good job!!!

(Now can you give insight about the bean/pot drop? ;) )
post #36 of 41
Yup! Anyone who'd drop a good pot must be off their bean!

doc
post #37 of 41
ROFL! Good comeback doc!!! :D ;)
post #38 of 41
Good thinking doc. But I'm not so sure.

Picture a well-equipped hearth in your mind. Now modify it, because few kitchens had as much cookware as we envision. Even large plantations made do with surprisingly little in that regard. Just read the inventories that accompany wills of that period.

At any rate, in that mind's picture you will see the following: Several three-legged pieces (skillets, pots, and Dutch ovens); a tin reflecting oven; and perhaps a braisier. This stuff is sitting on, or in front of, the hearth.

It's all used by raking coals out of the fire.

In the firebox, mounted to a sidewall, is a hinged crane. From that hangs (or will hang) various round-bottomed kettles.

When m'lady needs to work with one of those kettles---to add something to the pot, or stir it, or ladle out of it, or whathaveyou, she swings the crane outwards, away from the fire. Does what she has to do. And swings it back.

So it isn't a question of minimizing time in front of a roaring fire.

Second point: 99% of that hearthware is not round bottomed. And, unlike the kettles, it doesn't move further from and closer to the heat. Stirring and ladling is easier from round containers. But the idea that that's what's behind the designb doesn't quite wash.

I think some of the earlier suppositions, re: even and rapid heating, make more sense, because round-bottoms were designed to be used in, or over, open flames.

And, just to bore everyone further, cranes were the first labor saving kitchen device. The replaced gin poles, which were permanently mounted, side-to-side, across the fire box.

Cranes could be retrofitted. Built-in ovens, considered the next labor saver, could not be. To get one of those required building a new house. Or at least a new kitchen.

Even with the cranes, however, burning to death was the #2 cause of female mortality in the 18th and first part of the 19th centuries.

Putting that aside, hearth cooking is dangerous, back-breaking work. Anyone who's ever done it understands why portable cast iron stoves became so popular so quickly. Just imagine: You could feed your family safely, while comfortably standing upright.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #39 of 41
Hmm?? Pot and bean?? Probably the same results as an elephant and feather..
Here's your physics lesson for the day!! :lol:

The Physics Classroom
post #40 of 41
And do it outside in the summer to keep the house cooler.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #41 of 41
Phil,

Depending on geography and socio/economic status, there might be, during the 18th/early 19th centuries, summer kitchens separate from the house, and winter kitchens attached to it. This was fairly common on the plantations of the south and large estates of the mid-Atlantic states.

This practice actually declined, however, with the advent of the portable cast iron stove---which was basically the precursor to our modern gas & electric stoves. "Portable" was a misnomer. Moveable would have been a more likely description. Some of them weighed as much as 700 pounds. Once installed they pretty much stayed where they were put
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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