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Oil For Cutting Board - Page 2

post #31 of 40

Can't say I need a gallon.

 

But just the other week I bought a pint (16 fl. oz.) at my local Safeway store for $3.49 plus sales tax.  Found it in the drug area.  Food grade.

 

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #32 of 40

Since my stones are really large, at least eleven inches in length, I need lots of oil for cleaning and floating the swarf away.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #33 of 40

Can one use sesame oil on a cutting board?

post #34 of 40

Sesame oil smells funny and goes rancid very fast.  Bad choice.

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by L1spain View Post
 

Can one use sesame oil on a cutting board?


Any food oil will turn rancid and impart a bad odor to your board.  Use food grade mineral oil or mineral oil mixed with a bit of beeswax, approx 1-2cc beeswax per 500cc mineral oil.


Edited by kokopuffs - 7/11/14 at 8:52am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #36 of 40

food grade mineral oi

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post

For those interested in the science..... (sorry but it's my thing)

Veggy oil, lard and the like are triglycerides (3 fatty acids attached to glycerol backbone). With time these glycerides detach and react with other things like the wood pulp. Many natural oil glycerides also have sections that are unsaturated so they react with the air and become rancid. The rancidity helps to cross link with other glycerides to create a gummy plastic like substance. (application example:If you use flax seed oil (linseed) a very unsaturated oil, wood dust and natural fibers, roll into sheets and heat it up you end up with linoleum.)

Better to use a mineral oil (pharmacy grade or food grade).
Melted beeswax is good also.
These substance are not glycerides, are saturated and unreactive.

Luc

 

Thanks for the chemical explanation. I did put a bit of flaxseed oil (before knowing about mineral oil), so I'll have to see if it rances and/or becomes sticky. It does sound however that if it creates a plastic like substance that would create a waterproof cover on top of the wood while the oil should still nourish a bit. I don't have experience yet in it, so I wonder what people experienced using non-mineral oils.

post #38 of 40

After find a really good site in French (https://artdec.ca/blog/6/finition-et-entretien-dune-planche-a-decouper-dun-bloc-de-boucher-ou-dun-pl) and many more quality resources:

 

  • Use mineral oil (pharmacy or food grade) together with melted beeswax (to keep longer). You can use either alone as well. It'll however last less long than other solutions.

  • Tung oil (aka China wood oil) “L'huile d'abrasin” is one of the best if you want it to polymerize (siccative oils polymerize in the air spontaneously creating a strong protection layer)

  • Flaxseed oil is also ok (don't use lindseed oil which is toxis) but you need to let it dry for about 5 days. It'll give a more darker and antique look with time.

  • Do not use olive oil (or most other cooking oils), it’ll get rancid and sticky under certain conditions


Edited by Wernight - 7/22/15 at 2:37am
post #39 of 40

A thin layer of flaxseed should polymerize.  It is sold as linseed oil to finish projects if you are a woodworker.  Raw linseed oil is food safe.  Boiled linseed oil has additives that are not food safe.

 

Here I use flaxseed oil on my knife handle

 

 

 

It leaves a shiny, smooth, water resistant finish.  Not gummy, real slick. RAw linseed takes 4+ days to dry and polymerize.  Boiled will dry faster maybe a few hours.

 

Anyway for cutting boards, I don't want a smooth surface.  I use a 5:1 mixture of mineral oil:beeswax.  Just mix it together on a double boiler so it doesn't get too hot

post #40 of 40

Years ago we had a major kitchen renovation and I had (Oh I HAD!) a butcher block built into the counter about 3.5 feet long and the depth of the counter...oh it was GLORIOUS.  We had recommended to us at the time Terra Nova NaturOil and I loved it.  IT turned the block a bit darker but absorbed well, didn't stick, didn't go bad, didn't add any flavours and for home use lasted quite well...I'd oil the block about every quarter - flip it over and use the other side - in three months I'd oil the side I was using, flip it over and go for another three months.  By the time I got to use the  recently oiled side the oil was so nicely absorbed as to be invisible.  Great stuff.

 

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