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Anybody work in Australia??

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm an American and I've been in France for awhile and I'm trying to figure out what is next. I've had my eye on Australia for awhile, but I've heard it is very difficult to get a work visa, unless it's for a high paying white collar job. Anybody have any experience with this??
post #2 of 16
hi

My husband and I just arrived from working in Australia, he is a Chef, myself Pastry, and all I can say is be careful. It is not like North America with it's labor laws, we were on sponsorship by our employees, and worked with out sponsorship legally as well, living there for 4 years.

There is a lot of funny business that goes on there, black money is a big problem, sponsorship is a nightmare 90% of the time, and the Australian mentality is much different to what we were used to.

As a Chef my husband has worked in France for several years, in the middle east and in Australia, and for some reason the fact that they are so sheltered from the rest of the world makes them some what narrow minded to the fact that they have the best of everything, which they will remind you daily of. Coming from North America it made me crazy to see them cutting down Americans and their culture, and appoligising to Canadians for assuming they were American!

Don't get me wrong, go on Vacation to Australia, it's a beautiful country, but don't think that it's paradise and it is different to vacation there than it is to live as an immigrant.

So good luck, and if it were me i would consider somewhere a bit more modern, as they are a bit behind the times down there.

Regards
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks!! Did you need a work visa?? How long are you able to stay? Is it easy to find work? I'm well accustomed to being exploited as far as labor goes!!
post #4 of 16
Wow Koko, bad experience huh?! It's a big country - where did you work when you were down there?
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #5 of 16
Yes you technicly do need a visa, although it seems that most employers are more happy to pay you under the table in the restaurant industry even if you are legal ( with a working visa). I had a student visa for 9 mos. then became sposored by my employer.... big mistake, we sold our souls to stay there! Then after a year and a half I moved under my husbands visa who I met and married there who was also sponsored. My sponsore was sooo bad that I had no option, and as it turns out I managed to find work again, as a legal worker but my employer wasn't willing to pay me on the books! I finally convinced him to put me in the books as 32hrs a week, as we inteneded on applying for our PR and would require legitimate work records.
I am actually a qualified papered pastry chef, not just someone looking to work in a bakery or restaraunt with no experience.
So my husband and I decided we couldn't take anymore, we saved up and came back to Canada, where upon landing I was offered a job at one of the top restaurants in Vancouver and no surprise everything is legit!

I also want to note that there is something called superannuation which is required by all employers in Australia to pay to employees, as it is deducted from each pay and foreworded to a company who investes it and when you leave the country or retire you may pull this money, which is taxed at about 38%. I am still fighting for mine, as my employer said he was paying it for the last year, but in fact he was not, so it is important that you verify that everything is as it should be.

For god's sake don't work for someone small, work for a big company if you can, you will have a better chance of getting things done properly. Don't get me wrong it's a beautiful country, but it's not worth selling your soul to be there!
post #6 of 16
Am I the only aussie brave enough to make comment here? I am slightly (ok I'll put it politely) taken aback by what I'm reading here. Yes, we're a different country and all countries have different cultures and customs. Of course there is under the counter payment for services in some establishments - but does it happen in other countries? Bet you a 100 to 1 it happens everywhere and no country is a paradise. Lets get real pls.

As for superannuation - we're trying to replace the old age pension so people are independent in their retirement and not a drain on the taxpayer and it appears as part of your wage package. There is the odd employer who doesn't pay it - but they are answerable to the government and face major prosecution if its proven they haven't paid it to an employee.

And maybe we do have the best of everything - I doubt it some days - I think its probably only the loud Australians that bad-mouth loud Americans. My apologies to the quiet Australians and Americans! I know I'm probably over-reacting and apologise for it, I just can't stand to see this wonderful country of mine being put down. I've travelled and worked widely here and overseas - all countries and peoples have their good and bad points, and odd quirks of law/labour rules. But people are pretty much the same the world over. And naturally, vacationing in a country is different from living there. Any immigrant to any country will tell you that.

I'd live nowhere else.

That's my 2 cents worth.


P.S. Don't throw another shrimp on the barbie - that's another misconception!!

P.P.S. Tattoed Sousie - if you have the chance -visit before you commit to the move, or do your research thoroughly. There are a lot of great restaurants here - both large and small and all varieties inbetween - and a lot more culture that many would imagine. Why, we even have electricity and telephones and by gosh we got the internet recently :bounce: and tv
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 16
I am not in the catering trade. BUT, I visit Australia on a fairly regular basis. I find that their way of life is laid back, the 'no worries, mate', 'she'll be right' sort of attitude.

I like Aussies - and I, too, thought that Koko's jaundiced view of Aus was a wee bitty 'odd'!

PS - I love to visit, but I'd never want to live there permanently - as with most of us 'East, West, home's best'!:D

Edited because I'd put Sousie's name in para 2 - and it was Koko's views I was commenting upon!
post #8 of 16
Thanks Ishbel - I'm glad somebody likes us hehe :) I knew there had to be one out there!
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 16
Don't forget, I HAVE to like you.... half my family live in Australia!:D
post #10 of 16
hehehe Ish - you are stuck between a rock and a hard place :) But good onya!
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 16
"Anybody work in Australia?? "

About half of them.....boom boom tsch.
post #12 of 16
Normally you need to have work experience in an area where there is skills shortage.

Have you thought about saying that you have experience in IT? Everyone thinks that IT is really complicated stuff but whenever I phone the helpdesk when my computer at home starts playing up, they just say "have you tried turning it off and on?"

I reckon you should be able to bluff it out to get yourself over there, and then you could start looking for a proper job.
post #13 of 16
I can't cook and i can't use a computer, but I can't use a computer more than I can't cook which means I could probably be a chef. I think. Which would be fair dinkum as I threw andother sheila on the barbie and downed another bonzer tinni. Strewth - I came over all australian. ooeerr
post #14 of 16
I heard that nobody in Australia works. They wrestle crocs in their back yards and that's dinner:bounce:
post #15 of 16
Then go for a white-collar job, why not? Can't hurt to try.
post #16 of 16

i loved it

well i loved the country and i have to say i worked in some lovely establishments. One being ARIA , you should all try it if you get to sidney, id highly recommend it.Long hours but great boss and people.
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