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Which is it?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
As the saying goes:

"You say tomato , I say tomato..."

but I must profess that despite all my years in the industry, I still don't know the answer to this basic question.

Please, can anyone help put me out of my misery?

TIA.
post #2 of 28

(empty)


Edited by Luc_H - 10/24/15 at 8:28am
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #3 of 28

Right... unless.

Luc is totally correct unless you are in Virginia: in which case use the British pronunciation. My mother gets all kinds of upset when I say toe-may-to, it is always toe-mah-toe. I think this is true of other regions of the South as well. Particularly, cities which could be considered bastions of the "Old South" like Savannah etc...
post #4 of 28
so how do you say aunt?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 28
ahnt I reckon but hey I like ants too I try not to step on them.

I'm of the tom-ah-toe school, but mostly I just call 'em yummy

What you can do for fun is ask a New Zealander what comes after 5
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #6 of 28
What about :
bath or ba rth

or

scone or sc-oone

or

book or buk ?
post #7 of 28
Scone is a Scottish word, which we pronounce to rhyme with 'gone', the English pronounce to rhyme with 'loan' - and just to make it more interesting, it is also the name of the place where ancient Kings of Scotland were crowned and is pronounced to rhyme with 'loon'... :D
post #8 of 28
unti
mater
bisquit
post #9 of 28
Fag = Smoke or gay?
post #10 of 28
In Israel it is a cloth.

We say ag-van-yot, but when speaking in English we say to-may-toe.
post #11 of 28

does it realy matter?

as long as we know that tomatoes are round and red,
and cucumbers ar long and green.
good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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post #12 of 28
What about Kilometre?

Kill-oh-muh-ter

or
Kill-oh-meeter?

(Compare it to how you'd say centimeter and you'll get the idea - this is a favourite bug bear of mine)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #13 of 28
I have to chime in on this one...

Of all the words mispronounced, the one that annoys me the most is

BOUY
Being a Canadian who lives in the US, I hear it all the time pronounced

Boo-EE

My question is this.

If something is bouyant, it floats, if something has bouyancy, it floats.
Therefore, it's simply a BOY, not a Boo-EE

and while I'm on this track, the word QUAY is pronouced KEY!...not KWAY

Cat Man
post #14 of 28
But tomatoes aren't just round and red - they can be odd shaped, yellow, orange, purple, and other colors. The other day I had a green and white striped tomato.

Tanager Song Organic Heirloom Seeds

Shel
post #15 of 28
Cat Man- I thought you guys pronounced it Boo-eh?




Funny you mention quay. I used to pronuce "Q" (as in what lines are called in England) that way. Then there was the embarrising time when I tried to say nepotism.
post #16 of 28
My mother was from Boston and said "bahth" and "tomahto". We all disappointed her and said "bath" and "tomato".

I too, embarrassed myself by saying "quay" to a guy from England who I was dating. He looked at me rather strangly and asked if I meant "key".:blush: Um, isn't that what I said?

Along those same lines, I hate the signs in the grocery that say "12 items of less". I know you'll spend less $$ in those lines, but you'll be buying fewer items. Or the sign over the greens in the grocery that said "Mescalin Greens". I'll bet they flew out of there!!!:lol:
post #17 of 28
I better go rewrite that menu...
post #18 of 28
Either rewrite it or be prepared to offer something with a little more kick than just greens.:smoking:
post #19 of 28
While I've never heard anyone call "pizza" anything other than "peet-zaa", my dad absolutely refused to pronounce it that way. To him, it was simple. It had two "z"s, and therefore was "pizzzzz-ah pi".

One that is common and i don't really get too upset is "lasagne" vs. "lasagna". One's the noodle and one's the dish.

But I've heard them pronounced "la-zag-knee" and "la-zag-nuh".

But I never get over NY'ers and other US Easterners adding "r"s where there are none.

And Iowa, where I'm from, there was either a "boy" in the river swimming (or fallen out of a boat", or there were red or (now I can't remember white or blue") "boo-ees" that helped you navigate the deeper part of the Mississippi River.

doc
post #20 of 28
Another American pronounciation I've heard (NB: from a small number of Americans, not ALL Americans:lips:) is Woor chester shy er sauce - it's pronounced Wooster (as in the town and county of Worcester and Worcestershire) and Sheer - and most people don't bother to add the 'sheer', either! :crazy:

That sort of contraction sorts the British from the rest... for instance:

Names: Featherstonehaugh is actually pronounced Fanshawe
Cholmondley is Chumlee
Scottish names like Menzies and Gilzean are pronounced Mingis and Gileen
Leicester is Lester
Bicester is Bister
Leominster is Lemster
post #21 of 28

(empty)


Edited by Luc_H - 10/28/15 at 10:46pm
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #22 of 28
We just like to confuse non-natives!
post #23 of 28
The one I encounter all the time is pecan and pecon pie.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #24 of 28
Panini we all know it is PEE CAN pie..... LOL
Scott B
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As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
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Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
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post #25 of 28
you do what is easiest and convenient for you. as simple as that. someone does not like, tell them to take a hike.... sounds maybe rude. but i am many years in the hospitality industry. have worked in many countries. and each has their own names. but i use simple english and say tomatO.
good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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post #26 of 28

try ordering any onions that aren't "red" or "brown" in australia.... funny stuff...

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frayedknot View Post

Panini we all know it is PEE CAN pie..... LOL

 

I realize this is an old post but just couldn't resist...

A peecan is something grannies kept their beds for those middle of the nite nature calls  :eek:

A puh khan comes from the shade trees in the back yard and is as delish out of the shell as it is in a pie.

 

mimi

post #28 of 28

Reminds me of a story my friend told me.

In culinary school one of his instructors was discussing Anise.

He said "you can pronounce it Ah-niece, or An-isss, but never the 3rd pronunciation".

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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