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what kind of knife do you have? - Page 3

post #61 of 315

I have several, but the one I use mostly is an 8 inch JA Henckels that I bought for 1/2 price at the Williams-Sonoma Outlet.  Some people swear by the Santoku knives.  I can't seem to use them as well.

post #62 of 315
  • 8" Zwilling Cronidur
  • 4" Paring Zwilling Cronidur Knife
  • 6" some Henckels Santoku Knife (bought it from Walmart) - my first knife :D
  • 10" Mercer Cutlery Forged Riveted Chef Knife
  • 3" Mercer Cutlery Paring Knife
  • 6" Mercer Cutlery Boning Knife
  • 12" Mercer Cutlery Serrated Knife

 

All the Mercer Cutlery was from my culinary school.

 

Newest addition:

  • Suisin INOX Honyaki Gyuto 240mm

Edited by Dennie - 1/31/12 at 4:23pm
post #63 of 315

i have a miyabi kaizen chef as my go to knife, and the rest are a random assortment from wusthof to chicago cutlery

post #64 of 315

As time goes on, I seem to be simplifying:

 

300mm blue steel yanagiba (secret maker, extremely high quality, long story)

195mm yellow steel (?) yanagiba (minor local maker)

210mm white steel Aritsugu (Tsukiji) usuba

210mm black Aritsugu (Kyoto) deba

105mm Masamoto KS deba

 

OXO peeler

some sorta somethin-er-other bread knife thing

weird but functional serrated cheese knife thing

 

um....

 

I have a box grater. Does that count?

post #65 of 315

Most of my knife work is done with either a Tojiro DP Nakiri or a Kantesune 240 Gyuto.  While I have others, I generally reach for one or the other.  IMO the most overrated knife is the Santuko, the most underrated the Nakiri. 

 

I keep several Forschners left over from my packing house days.  IMO they are the best of the inexpensive knives.  As value packed J knives, I would prefer the DP. 

 

 

post #66 of 315
I've not used a Nakiri. What makes that knife more appealing than a gyuto at any given time? I keep thinking more knife types would be cool but then don't know when I'd pick them up instead of a gyuto.
post #67 of 315

What I like about the Nakiri is that while it is a relatively flat blade edge, the tip is rounded and the knife glides back and forth along the cutting board.  Somewhat like cutting on a meat slicer or mandoline.  It also has a large enough surface to scoop up the product.

 

The Nakiri is designed as a vegetable slicer, but works well for meat for me.  Like many knives, it works best if very sharp.  You don't want to saw with it.

 

I'm a fan of the DP line from Tojiro.  OOTB the knife is as sharp as any I have.  I don't sharpen my own knives, but send them to a very good sharpener, including new knives.  He suggested I use this one without his services.  He was right.

post #68 of 315
Thanks, jimbo,
post #69 of 315

I make my own.

 

dcarch

 

knifecuttingbd2.jpgknifecuttingbd.jpg

post #70 of 315

Those are some wild looking blades. I'm going to make a wild guess that you make lots of knives that are not kitchen knives, too (?)

post #71 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wagstaff View Post

I've not used a Nakiri. What makes that knife more appealing than a gyuto at any given time? I keep thinking more knife types would be cool but then don't know when I'd pick them up instead of a gyuto.


When I read this first thought I had is how does the nakiri compare to the usuba?

 

Could this knife be the answer to the various problems some relate to a usuba, or are they too very different?

 

 

Quote:
Most of my knife work is done with either a Tojiro DP Nakiri or a Kantesune 240 Gyuto.  While I have others, I generally reach for one or the other.  IMO the most overrated knife is the Santuko, the most underrated the Nakiri.

 

Being my Tojiro DP santoku is close to being my second most used knife (running close with a 120mm, and due to the fact I do a good amount of quick small jobs, and sometimes on a smallish board) I have to wonder if a nakiri could possibly change this? :)

 

 

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #72 of 315

I have a Shun Kaji 12" chefs that I use for most tasks. I find that Japanese steel just holds a sharper edge, and longer than the German knives. Love the handle design on the Shun as well as someone mentioned before. I would never go back to a more traditional style handle after using my Shun.

post #73 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by LennyD View Post



When I read this first thought I had is how does the nakiri compare to the usuba?

 

Could this knife be the answer to the various problems some relate to a usuba, or are they too very different?

 

 

 

Being my Tojiro DP santoku is close to being my second most used knife (running close with a 120mm, and due to the fact I do a good amount of quick small jobs, and sometimes on a smallish board) I have to wonder if a nakiri could possibly change this? :)

 

I'm a cook, nor a knife expert, so my comments indicate what works best for me. 

 

When I refer to a Nakiri, I am referring specifically to my DP clad Nakiri, a knife with a VG 10 core and a softer single layer exterior, as opposed to my Kanetsunes, which are a VG 10 core with a 16 layer exterior.  I think the Rockwell numbers are similar in both cases, so the big difference I observe is in appearance, not performance.  The K's are slightly biased but not enough for me, a leftie, to notice.  For me, the big advantage of the nakiri in slicing is that it never has to be raised from the cutting board or the angle changed to return the blade for a new cut. The wide blade also allows me to use my off hand thumb as a thickness guage and safety block, and makes a good scoop for the finished produce. This is due to the rounded cutting edge instead of a tip.  The usubas I have seen have a squared point, which will dig into the board when reversed.  In addition, the usuba's I have seen have a chisel blade, which makes if unusable for me.

 

My santoku is also a Kanetsune (100 series), with a VG 10 core.  All are equally sharp.  For me the santoku is a compromise knife, and just does not feel right to me. 

 

I agree that any knife must be sharp to maximize its use.  This especially true for the nakiri, as you want the knife to glide smoothly through a veggie without pressure or resistance.  I do not sharpen myself, preferring to use the services of a very good professional sharpener.  I agree with the CKTG list, and Rob Babcock sharpened my knives before Mark created his list.  It works for me.  The minor inconvenience of a a week or so turnaround is offset by not having a new hobby with its new box of tools.  I do use an 1200/8K King for minor touch ups. 

 

As stated, all this works for me.  I prefer the nikiri and/or the gyuto for 90% of my cutting.  I think it really boils down to what works for you.  The knife should feel right to you and not intimidate.  Nakiri vs Santuko is a personal preference.

 

 

 



 

post #74 of 315
Jumbo

That all makes sense, and a nikiri and also a Chinese cleaver are two of the knives least like what I have used but also both on my future wish list.

Thanks for your input, and never worry about not being an expert as personally at least I have found non professional reviews very helpful as the info seems much more useful as the experience level may be more similar etc. Not to take anything away from professional reviews and just that some of the things important to one is not always the same with the other.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #75 of 315

A Chinese cleaver is a knife that I will someday buy on impulse, although I can't tell you why.  I have heard good things about the CCK, a cheap Chinese that apparently has good steel but is poorly finished.  I someday will buy one and see if it can be made into an excellent knife with a little tweaking.

 

Anybody have one of these?

post #76 of 315
I think the CCK is good geometry for a cleaver, not particularly good steel. You pay a lot more for a more finished handle. I have one. I learned that I'm a gyuto person. Some people are cleaver people.
post #77 of 315

Last year i toke my first head chefs job. my trusty victornox set had taken me on a good session in the years but i though i would treat myself to a couple of shuns. yes they were costly at the time. but from my first day in my new kitchen i new they were well worth the money. Ben

post #78 of 315

I collected Wusthof knives and love my 5" & 8" chef knives. I like the weight and the way they fit my hand. I have been cooking for nearly 50 years and have had good luck with these knives. They hold an edge very well for me. 

post #79 of 315

I have used both henckel and wusthof 8 in, classic, I think the wusthof holds an edge longer

post #80 of 315

My Grandpy loved Henckel knifes so when It came time to look for my own knives I got a 8" chef from the 4star series; loved it so much that I immediately purchased the accompanying set. I have tried using dozens of knifes and none of them fit in my hand like the 4stars.

post #81 of 315

Chef's Knife/Gyuto:

     240mm Konosuke HD

     240mm Takeda AS

 

Slicer

     270mm Honsho Kanemasa E-Series Sujihiki

 

Bread

    10-1/2" MAC Superior

 

Petty

    180mm Honosuke HD

 

Yanagiba

Masamoto shiro ko takobiki

    

Butchering

    150mm Tojiro Honesuki 

   WM Beatty & Son #1 (turn of the century) heavy carbon cleaver

 

Sharpening Equipment

No name diamond plate

   Beston 500

    Shapton 1000 and 4000 glass stone

    Home made balsa “strop”


Edited by mano - 2/4/13 at 10:27am
post #82 of 315

Alright, late to the party as usual but in an attempt to keep the thread kicking (and dodge finals) this is my collection:

 

-10 inch Sabatier TI Nogent Chef's (Carbon)

 

-8 inch Wusthof Ikon Chef's (SS)

 

-8 inch Sabatier Lion Rampant Chef's (SS)

 

-8 inch Sabatier Lion Rampant Carving Knife (SS)

 

-~7 1/2 inch Sabatier 2 Lions Chef's (SS)

 

-~6 inch Sabatier 2 Lions Utility Knife (SS)

 

-~6 inch K Sabatier Utility Knife (SS)

 

-~6 inch K Sabatier Cleaver (SS)

 

-~10 inch TI Bread knife? (Not quite sure, I'll post pics at one point) (SS)

 

-3 inch Wusthof Classic petty (SS)

 

-3 inch mysterious Sabatier with Brass bolster (possibly quite old, the handle had rotted off) (SS)

 

-2x 3 inch Victorinox Petty knives (SS)

 

 

A bit too much stainless steel for me but my total cost was 300$ (Canadian, 120 of which was for the Nogent)

 

Not bad for a student if I may say so myself!

 

post #83 of 315

too many knives, many are custom made from aritsugu, sugimoto, and sets of masahiros etc.

post #84 of 315
  • CCK 1303 Chinese #3 slicer/cleaver, carbon-steel
  • San Han Nga Chinese #2 cleaver, carbon-steel (heavier-duty than CCK for tougher stuff)
  • Tojiro ITK 120mm petty, white #2
  • Fujiwara FKM 150mm petty, stainless
  • Henckels Twin Four Star 80mm paring, stainless

 

Sharpening- Beston 500, Bester 1200, Suehiro Rika 5000, Idahone 1200 rod. $180 of sharpening supplies for $150 of knives. That's about right, actually!

 

I'd like to re-handle the Tojiro. D-shaped handles, plastic ferrules and lefty me don't all get along very well. At some point, I'll probably add a bread knife (Forschner or MAC), and a 240mm gyuto. And maybe upgrade to the Richmond take on the cleaver in 52100 steel. But for now I'm quite happy, so no hurry.

post #85 of 315

Konosuke HD 240 gyuto

Masamoto KS 240 gyuto 

Konosuke 120 petty

moritaka 150 petty

Takeda 150 honesuki

Mac superior 10.5 inch bread knife

wusthof ikon  boning knife

Shun paring knife

 

 

 

Is what is currently in my knife roll.

post #86 of 315

I use a set of forged Mundial knives, as well as a traveling set of forged Mundial when I'm cooking at someone's house. I also own Wusthof, Shun, Messermeister, Mercer, Henkels and Forshner. I became so involved in chef's cutlery that I made a business out of it. Without any sample or inventory of knives I have over 70 besides the two sets of Mundial.
 

post #87 of 315

Global. there is none better in my opinion

post #88 of 315

I actually inherited my great-grandpa's butcher knife set. They're Rogers brand? The full 8-pc set, complete with carver/slicer, 8" Chef, utility, parer, boner...etc. They're like 70 years old at this point and are still pretty dang sharp. One of the Chefs at my work suggested I buy some new ones, but I'm REALLY attached to these guys, considering they're an heirloom. Gotta go down to Ambrosi Brothers soon and get 'em sharpened, actually...

post #89 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thierry Reverse View Post

Global. there is none better in my opinion

Curious what others you have used that you believe the Globals are better than, and what is better in your opinion.

Purpose of the question is that I have found the more quality knives I try the more My opinion changes or adapts.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #90 of 315

so far, i have (all from the wusthof classic series): a chef's knife, a santoku, a big bread knife and a paring knife.  i think i'm mostly set for knives.
 

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